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AgDay Daily Recap -November 28, 2012

November 28, 2012
 
 

TODAY ON AGDAY
NOVEMBER 28, 2012

FARM INCOME:

Good morning I’m Tyne Morgan, in for Clinton Griffiths. It really comes as no surprise, but economists at USDA says the drought is taking a big bite out of farm incomes. And that's our top story on AgDay. Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack says the farm safety net showed its merit and it should serve as a reminder that congress must "pass a comprehensive, multi-year food, farm and jobs bill that provides greater certainty for farmers and ranchers in the season ahead."

WHEAT PASTURE:

As the drought worsens across the country, so does the nation's winter wheat crop. Dry soils are causing poor emergence and the condition rating to continue to slide. All of this talk about dry weather in the western and southern plains brings a brutal reality back into many coffee shop talks across the country-- what if we have another dry year? Darren Frye of Water Street Solutions says if the moisture doesn't come, we could see the commodity markets rapidly climb higher.

RIVER LEVELS:

Meanwhile, Illinois corn growers are sounding the alarm if something isn't done quickly to improve water levels on the drought-plagued Mississippi River. Specifically, they have concerns about the ability to get adequate fertilizer supplies to the Midwest. The Illinois Corn Growers Association told AgDay that fertilizer prices could climb as much as 50-dollars a ton. That’s because shippers would be forced to use more rail service and less barge shipping. The ICGA says more than half of the fertilizer used in the Midwest is delivered on the river.

CROP WATCH:

We continue to hear reports of the drought returning in some areas and getting worse in others parts of the country. Mike Hoffman has the details in this morning's cropwatch.

WETLANDS:

The fertilizers used to help farmers raise food don't always stay put. They can become a problem in the water supply. Decades of research at the University of Illinois is now narrowing in on some possible solutions to clean up the problem. In this report provided by the U of I, Todd Gleason says the research is showing plenty of positive results in wetlands.

CASE AND NEW HOLLAND:

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