AgDay Daily Recap -September 28, 2012

September 28, 2012 05:57 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY
SEPTEMBER 28, 2012

NORTH CAROLINA GRAIN:

Good morning I’m Tyne Morgan in for Clinton Griffiths. Sky rocketing grain prices are forcing livestock producers to look to other countries for grain.

GRAIN STOCKS:

Meanwhile, later this morning we'll get a handle on the latest grain supply numbers.

USDA releases its quarterly grain stocks report at 8:30 eastern time. Our partners at Profarmer say the key will be how much of the current harvest is counted towards the September first stocks figure. You’ll be able to access those reports immediately on agweb.com.

HEALTHY SOILS:

Farmers in the western cornbelt are still looking for drought relief. While most look to the sky, experts at USDA say part of the drought solution is below us, not above us, in the soil. USDA's Bob Ellison shows us why.

FALL TILLAGE:

Meanwhile, Dow Agrosciences Agronomist John Long says good applications of fall fertility will also help soils that are suffering from the drought. He says in areas that have received some rain relief and have adequate soil moisture, fall applications of anhydrous ammonia will be beneficial. During this year's Farm Progress show, tillage was a major focus which could help alleviate soil compaction left from the drought.

MONSANTO BAN:

Russia has suspended the use and importation of genetically modified corn from Monsanto. Monsanto says the ban will have little effect on the company since the Russian government doesn't allow farmers to plant biotech crops. The ban comes after a study by a university in France claimed genetically modified corn caused tumors and other negative health effects in rats. Monsanto says the study is flawed since it doesn't provide critical information about how the research was done. Monsanto also says the data presented doesn't support the author's interpretations.

CROP WATCH:

From soybean rust to rain relief, Cindi Clawson has crop updates from across the country in this morning's crop watch.

FARM FUEL:

Harvest requires thousands of gallons of fuel...which is why many operations keep fuel tanks on farm. But there's concern new EPA rules could make significant changes to how that fuel is stored.

PROFIT BRIEFING:

A lot of the market discussion this harvest season has focused on selling the grain right off the combine. But at what point does it make sense to put your grain in the bin? Profarmer Editor Chip Flory and senior market analyst Brian Grete join us from the Profarmer studios to look at the market structure. Thanks guys. For subscribers to the Profarmer newsletter, here's what you can expect when it comes out later today. The guys will have details of USDA's quarterly grain stocks report. Plus, rains clear the way for start of Brazil’s soybean planting season. And from Washington - lawmakers leave town with no more progress on 2012 Farm Bill.

VETS ON CALL:

Some youngsters have a dream of being a cowboy. But sometimes reality gets in the way of those dreams. That's the case for Doctor Don Goodman - a Veterinarian from Navasota, Texas. He like's working with beef cows, but don admits - he just wasn't a very good cowboy, so he took another career path. And as you'll find out in this edition of "Vets On Call' - his clients are glad he did. We'll be running " Vets On Call " webisodes on a regular basis on AgDay.  You can also watch other " Vets On Call " videos on YouTube. The address is on your screen. We’d also like to mention that Pfizer Animal Health funded the Vets On Call video series.

HUNGRY KIDS:

In food and your family, the USDA's new school lunch program has gotten off to a rocky start in some areas. A group from Kansas, including two teachers and high school students, created a YouTube video to help voice their concerns.

PECAN CRAVING:

China is going nuts over U.S. pecans. That could make you shell out more money for the popular nut.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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