Apr 17, 2014
Home | Tools| Events| Blogs| Discussions Sign UpLogin

Thanksgiving Dinner Costs Rise

November 16, 2011
 
 
 

Thanksgiving dinner will cost $5.73 more this year than it did last year. American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) recently completed its 26th annual informal price survey of traditional items found on the Thanksgiving table. This year the cost of dinner for 10 is $49.20 according to AFBF. Last year the price of the meal was $43.47.

"The cost of this year’s meal remains a bargain, at just under $5 per person," said AFBF President Bob Stallman, a rice and cattle producer form Texas. "The quality and variety of food produced for our dinner tables on America’s diverse farms and ranches sets us apart from our contemporaries around the world. It is an honor for our farm and ranch families to produce food from our nation’s land for family Thanksgiving celebrations."
 
The survey includes turkey, bread stuffing, sweet potatoes, rolls with butter, peas, cranberries, a relish tray of carrots and celery, pumpkin pie with whipped cream and beverages of coffee and milk all quantities sufficient to serve a family of 10.
 
AFBF reported turkey prices increased 25 cents per pound over last year. "Turkey prices are higher this year primarily due to strong consumer demand both here in the U.S. and globally," said John Anderson, an AFBF senior economist. The survey also revealed: a gallon of whole milk increased in price by 42 cents per gallon, to $3.66, a 30-ounce can of pumpkin pie mix, $3.03, up 41 cents; two nine-inch pie shells, $2.52, up 6 cents; a ½ pint of whipping cream, $1.96, up 26 cents; one pound of green peas, $1.68, up 24 cents; a 14-ounce package of cubed bread stuffing, $2.88, up 24 cents; a dozen brown-n-serve rolls, $2.30, up 18 cents; three pounds of sweet potatoes, $3.26, up 7 cents; and fresh cranberries, $2.48, up 7 cents.
 
"Demand for U.S. dairy products has been strong throughout the year and continues to influence retail prices, as demand for higher-quality food products grows globally," Anderson said.
 
During the survey 141 volunteer shoppers from 35 states were asked to look for the best possible prices, without taking advantage of special promotional coupons or purchase deals, such as spending $50 and receiving a free turkey. Anderson is certain that despite retail price increases during the last year, consumers have enjoyed relatively table food costs over the past several years.
 

 

See Comments

RELATED TOPICS: Fun

 

MARKETS

CROPSLIVESTOCKFINANCEENERGYMETALS
Market Data provided by Barchart.com
Enter Zip Code below to view live local results:
bayer
 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions