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RSS By: Jeanne Bernick, Top Producer

Jeanne, Top Producer Editor, grew up on a beef cattle operation in Southwest Missouri and now writes from the heart of corn country in Eastern Iowa.

Land Use Change....huh?

Aug 27, 2009

Do you understand this land use change stuff?

That’s the question I'm getting from farmers, ethanol plant managers and even a major seed company representative during the Land Use and Carbon Impacts of Corn-Based Ethanol conference hosted by the National Corn Growers Association in St. Louis.
 
My answer is: Of course! Well, sort-of. Um, maybe. Heck, I don’t know.
 
It is a very confusing topic. The gist of the land use change debate is whether corn and soybeans grown in the U.S. for biofuels production is causing land use changes around the world; i.e. Brazil plowing up virgin rainforest to plant more soybeans to replace U.S. crops grown for biofuels.
 
But how do we really account for changes in land use halfway around the world? How do we know the TRUE reason behind a shift in land use?
 
Even the leading ag economists of our day are scratching their heads on this issue (read Land Use Change Tricky to Measure). They claim it is simply impossible to verify why land use changes occur.
 
“We are trying to measure the unmeasurable,” says Bruce Babcock, ag economist with Iowa State University’s Center for Agriculture and Rural Development (CARD). “We would never really be able to verify why those acres changed production plans. Annual agricultural land use is flux, and largely variable.”
 
Interpretation: No one really knows what influences land use change. Farmers make planting decisions in the U.S. and around the world based on a multitude of factors (weather, markets, weed and insect pressure), not just one factor like increased biofuels production in the U.S.
 
What I do know is this: legislation is barreling down the pipe based on land use change, and it could impact how farmers produce food and fuel. Someone better figure out the answers to this stuff sooner than later…..


For More Information
Bias Against Biofuels, Summer Issue of Farm Journal
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COMMENTS (3 Comments)

Happy Hoosier
Well it is odd that no one questioned this the last 50 years when they cleared the jungles down there for soybeans. Where were the land use change whistle blowers back then? Lobbyist can change shirts very quickly in DC...and who is paying them your never sure..
Ethanol has been and is good for our nation but outside interest and inside interest without the ties of patriotism has continued to nip at it's heels....Not sure whee this will all end.
8:37 AM Aug 27th
 
Doc Cottingham
Follow the environmental causes money trail. That will probably lead you to the answer. Who stands to gain by reducing ethanol use? Who wants their agenda pushed to the forefront? Answer these questions, and you will have it figured out. Chances are they argue with their mouth full!
10:11 PM Aug 26th
 

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