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$100 Ideas

August 24, 2013
 
 

$200 Double Your Money Winner!

F13314 A

Wayne Sather gets a lot of use out of the six wire winders he’s made so far for his beef cattle, hay, corn and soybean operation. Once he found a small wheel rim with the right inside diameter hub, it took him less than an hour to fabricate the winder. Wayne’s farm was honored this year with Century Farm status.

Wind It Up In Style

F13314 B

An old car wheel rim easily doubles as an electric fence winder. First, weld a 12" long by 2" diameter pipe in the center of the hub. Next, to make a brace for the winder, weld a 14" long pipe that fits inside the hub pipe at a right angle to a 15" long pipe that’s big enough to fit over a "T" fence post. Mount the winder to this brace, and drill a hole through the end of the smaller pipe. Secure with a bolt and nut. The winder should be able to "spin" on the axle. On the side of the rim that faces out, weld a 10" long rod perpendicular to the rim to use as a crank. Finally, weld a rod or flat iron about 16" long to use to stabilize the brace and winder when in use.


Corner Post Stands Its Ground

F13314 C

Repurposed irrigation well columns make good corner posts. First, make a bracket to fit around the column using angle iron, eye bolts, nuts and cable wire. In the middle of the bracket, weld a piece of 1¼" square tubing with a hole on the top for a bolt. Next, fabricate a crank-like handle with round tubing and flat iron to fit through the square tube. Fasten a cable around the corner post and to each side of the round tubing. As you crank, the cable makes the gate tight. The bolt in the square tubing holds the crank in place.

Duwane Decker

Frankfort, S.D.


Better Grip for Safer Climbing

F13314 D

When my neighbor lost his grip and fell from the top of a ladder on a side dump wagon, I decided to try to prevent the same thing from happening at my farm. I attached a ¾"x3' piece of angle iron with two small bolts on the inside edge of the wagon at the top of the ladder. The angle iron serves as a grip to prevent your hands from slipping from the otherwise straight edge.

Dale Swedzinski

Taunton, Minn.

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FEATURED IN: Farm Journal - September 2013
RELATED TOPICS: $100 ideas

 
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