Jul 22, 2014
Home| Tools| Events| Blogs| Discussions Sign UpLogin

Milk ‘Em For All They're Worth

May 22, 2014
By: Jim Dickrell, Dairy Today Editor
 
 

Record high milk prices and slowly receding feed prices are offering strong incentives to milk every cow possible. The April culling report, released this afternoon by the United States Department of Agriculture, shows dairy farmers are doing just that.

In April, dairy farmers sent 38,000 fewer cows to slaughter through Federally inspected plants than they did a year ago. That’s a decline of 14%.

Compared to March 2014, farmers sent 16,000 fewer cows to market, or 6.5%. However, there was one fewer business day in March than in April this year. So on a daily basis, they sent about 11% fewer cows to market—11,714 cows per day in March compared to 10,455 cows in April.

Year-to-date, 117,000 fewer dairy cows have been sent to McDonalds and Burger King. That’s a decline of 10.6%.

Read the full report here.

See Comments

RELATED TOPICS: Dairy, USDA, Risk Management

 
Log In or Sign Up to comment

COMMENTS (2 Comments)

MNDEB - MN
really? "milk them for all they're worth" more like a case of "got short memories?"
a good share of the major dairy producing states were out of feed in 2013 due to either drought or winter kill. High feed prices and lack of feed forced producers to sell cows and heifers combined high market prices for beef.
2014 has even higher beef prices so "where's the dairy beef?"
It not about keeping every cow in the pipeline, feed costs don't warrant that mentality, the bottom 1/3 has already been culled. Producers already have their best cows in the herd is why 2014 culling in less than 2013.
To survive in the dairy business today requires more than "milking them for all they're worth" Its all about managing every margin.
7:48 AM May 27th
 
MNDEB - MN
really? "milk them for all they're worth" more like a case of "got short memories?"
a good share of the major dairy producing states were out of feed in 2013 due to either drought or winter kill. High feed prices and lack of feed forced producers to sell cows and heifers combined high market prices for beef.
2014 has even higher beef prices so "where's the dairy beef?"
It not about keeping every cow in the pipeline, feed costs don't warrant that mentality, the bottom 1/3 has already been culled. Producers already have their best cows in the herd is why 2014 culling in less than 2013.
To survive in the dairy business today requires more than "milking them for all they're worth" Its all about managing every margin.
7:48 AM May 27th
 



Name:

Comments:

Receive the latest news, information and commentary customized for you. Sign up to receive the AgWeb Daily eNewsletter today!.

 
 
Enter Zip Code below to view live local results:
bayer
 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions