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AgDay Daily Recap - February 27, 2012

February 27, 2012
 
 

TODAY ON AGDAY

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

HORSE SLAUGHTER:

Good morning everyone. Last November President Obama signed into law a spending bill that restores the American horse-slaughter industry. In 2006, congress took away funding for inspections. Without those inspections, the meat-for-consumption could not be sold. Most of that meat was shipped to Europe and Asia. But the domestic ban did not end horse slaughter. Instead it moved to Mexico and Canada. Now, a company called "Unified Equine" hopes to build a processing plant in Missouri. Linda Russell from AgDay affiliate KY3TV has our story. That's Linda Russell reporting. Linda says unified equine would distribute the horse meat to domestic, ethnic, specialty and gourmet markets here in the United States and across the world. While horse meat for human consumption is not widely accepted in this country, it is acceptable in other countries. Is it a necessary system? We would like to hear from you about this issue. Send your comments to the AgDay inbox...or join the conversation on Facebook.

HEN CAGES:

Meanwhile, the debate over a proposed ban on conventional cages for laying hens is also heating-up. Last Friday on AgDay, you met Indiana egg producer Bob Krouse. Krouse negotiated with the Humane Society of the United States on a proposed law that would change conventional cages used by a majority of the nation's egg producers. Many livestock groups are opposed to the bill. As president of 'The United Egg Producers' Trade Organization, Krouse felt he needed to cross "traditional barriers" to reach an agreement with HSUS. We received numerous comments to the AgDay inbox.

HEN CAGES INBOX:

Richard House from Illinois says, “If this country wants to see another entire industry "exported" or chased away from this country, then just keep thinking you can deal with yet another loud, persistent and obnoxious activist group!"

Tom Jacques from Missouri says "The Humane Society poking its nose into chicken housing will result in a mortally wounded industry." he adds that it'll create another "Federal agency regally ruled by beltway rubes who wouldn't know that potatoes don't grow on bushes."

And 17 year-old Landon Fox of Illinois farms with his grandfather. He says "It's easy for someone to sit down and say "this, this, and this needs to change" when in reality they don't know what they are talking about to begin with." And viewer Kurt Bachman says the proposed legislation is ridiculous. He says "What's next? Maybe 3 bedroom, 2 bath homes for all cattle? Or maybe we can propose that all fish must live in distilled water - no impurities allowed." Our thanks to everyone for writing to us. Later this week, we'll share some of the comments regarding the Missouri horse slaughter plant.

CATTLE ON FEED:

In other news, the latest cattle on feed report shows cattle and calves-on-feed for slaughter in the U.S. are up 2% from a year ago. USDA pegs the total at 11.8 million head. Meanwhile, placements in feedlots during January are down 2% from the same period last year, totaling 1.9 million head.

USDA AG OUTLOOK:

USDA's top economist expects a significant increase in u-s corn acreage this year. The Ag Department's Joe Glauber is forecasting 94 million acres. That would be largest plantings since World War II. If the nationwide average hits 164-bushels to the acre, production levels would surpass 14 billion bushels for the first time. During its annual outlooks forum, the department expects corn prices will return below five dollars a bushel as they forecast domestic inventories will double to 1.6 billion bushels. USDA expected soybean acres to remain steady from last year at 75 million acres.

TORNADO OUTLOOK:

www.accuweather.com has released its tornado forecast for 2012. Their weather experts anticipate an active tornado season again this year. In 2011, there were more than 1,700 tornadoes recorded and it ranks as the fourth deadliest season on record. Accuweather expects an above-normal tally this year due in part, to warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico.

ANALYSIS:

Joe Vaclavik

IN THE COUNTRY; BUY LOCAL:

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COMMENTS (2 Comments)

JanWindsong - El Dorado Hills, CA
Regarding your article on horse slaughter and the proposed slaughterplant in Missouri.

First, you open your article with a light hearted statement that Pres Obama signed into law a spending bill that restored horse slaughter. Actually, he signed a budget which had had a prohibition on the spending for inspections stripped in closed session by three senators (Kingston (GA); Blunt (MO); and Kohl (WI)) over the objection of Rep Carr (CA). This last minute stripping was done after the Senate version had passed and been presented to the House. The House version had the prohibition in it, but then stripped without review and voted on without comment. The budget was presented to Obama and signed via remote pen. This is not actually restoration, but rather subterfuge and collusion to thwart the efforts of 80% of Americans who do not condone horse slaughter. Despite the rosy picture painted by the industrialists wanting to start up a slaugher plantin Missouri, any reporter putting their ear to the ground will hear the groundswell of opposition. Those against horse slaughter have fought too long and spent too many hours educating themselves and the public.

In answer to your question, is horse slaughter a necessary system? No.
5:30 PM Feb 27th
 
JanWindsong - El Dorado Hills, CA
Regarding your article on horse slaughter and the proposed slaughterplant in Missouri.

First, you open your article with a light hearted statement that Pres Obama signed into law a spending bill that restored horse slaughter. Actually, he signed a budget which had had a prohibition on the spending for inspections stripped in closed session by three senators (Kingston (GA); Blunt (MO); and Kohl (WI)) over the objection of Rep Carr (CA). This last minute stripping was done after the Senate version had passed and been presented to the House. The House version had the prohibition in it, but then stripped without review and voted on without comment. The budget was presented to Obama and signed via remote pen. This is not actually restoration, but rather subterfuge and collusion to thwart the efforts of 80% of Americans who do not condone horse slaughter. Despite the rosy picture painted by the industrialists wanting to start up a slaugher plantin Missouri, any reporter putting their ear to the ground will hear the groundswell of opposition. Those against horse slaughter have fought too long and spent too many hours educating themselves and the public.

In answer to your question, is horse slaughter a necessary system? No.
5:30 PM Feb 27th
 



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