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Climate Change Creates New Farming Risks

June 10, 2014
By: Boyce Thompson, AgWeb.com Editorial Director google + 
rolling storm
  

Severe weather is forcing farmers to innovate and invest in new technology.

Like any smart business person, Trey Hill, a fourth-generation farmer from Rock Hill, Md., wants to do things once and move on. The problem is that severe weather—whether it’s torrential rains, extreme summer heat or cold spring temperatures—keeps messing with his best-laid plans.

For the past several years, "large rain events" in late May or early June have forced him to replant large swaths of the more than 10,000 acres farmed by Harborview Farms. This year, five inches of rainfall wiped out big sections that had to be replanted.

"This has become the norm, whereas 20 years ago, it was the exception," said Hill, who plants corn, soybeans and wheat. "We had to incorporate replanting into our budget, given that there’s a pretty good chance we’ll have to do it twice."

Hill was one of several farmers and ranchers speaking in May at a conference on climate change in Washington D.C. put on by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. The think tank published a report distributed at the conference concluding that climate change is cutting into productivity gains in the United States and throughout the world.

Farmers may disagree over the cause of climate change, especially whether it’s caused by humans, but it’s difficult to dismiss the extreme weather patterns that have developed in recent years. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack attributed the new patterns to climate change.

"You all know that the climate is changing, and you all know that it impacts agriculture. More intense weather patterns, longer droughts, more severe storms, more pests and diseases—this really does have an impact on agriculture. If we don’t get serious about adapting and mitigating, it will just continue."

Howard W. Buffett, only in his fourth year of farming, picked a difficult time to enter the business. In his first year, flooding of the Mississippi came within a mile of his Nebraska farm. The next year he was hit by drought, which he mitigated with center-pivot irrigation. Buffett reasoned that if he could survive and prosper through this extreme weather, he could stay in business for long-term.

Then this spring, four days and nights of unseasonably cold weather took out nearly his entire cornfield. "I’m standing there looking out over 5.5 million corn plants on 160 acres, and they are all just brown, and withered, and laying on the ground. My heart sank. This is just a horrible sight to see."

Flash forward 48 hours. "We ordered up some good sun, strong winds and high temperatures, and the entire field rebounded. The corn was completely green again. It was growing new leaves. And I thought, ‘my gosh, this is truly remarkable.’"

Buffett had, of course, planted seeds that resulted in resilient plants. But he attributes some of this "miracle," along with a 20% increase in yields during his farming tenure, to sustainable farming practices that improve his chance of success. He refrains from tilling his soil, allowing nutrients from residue to seep back into the ground. He plants a cover crop of radishes. And he rotates his crops.

Patrick O’Toole, owner and manager of Ladder Livestock, hasn’t been as lucky. O’Toole, who raises cattle and sheep and grows hay near Savery, Wyo., lost 150 sheep earlier this year after a big rain turned to snow. This happened soon after the ranch finished shearing its lambs. Unlike corn, O’Toole said dryly, sheep don’t regenerate.

"Once they are gone, they are gone," said the rancher, using the story to illustrate the livestock industry’s need for a financial safety net. O’Toole managed to save many of the ranch’s new lambs in a recently constructed shed. And now he stores water since runoff from the mountains seems to be coming a month early.

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COMMENTS (1 Comments)

JBCropper - Greensboro, NC
Talk about Big Weather, the Mississippi River flooded so badly that "Howard W. Buffett, only in his fourth year of farming, picked a difficult time to enter the business. In his first year, flooding of the Mississippi came within a mile of his Nebraska farm". That is one BIG flood. The Mississippi backed way up the Missouri River to come within a mile of his farm. Wow.

Climate change advocates like to exaggerate, but this tops even Al Gore.

People conveniently forget about the 1930's, Washington's wintering at Valley Forage in the late 1700's and the devastating blizzards on the northern Great Plains in the late 1800's. The 1950's were not so great either and since my Brother and I took over the farm in 1980, it has been too much or too little heat or rain more often than not. I am still waiting for the weather not to be changeable and unpredictable. Probably should move to the Sahara, it does not change much there, but it is too hot.


7:12 PM Jul 8th
 



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