Sep 20, 2014
Home| Tools| Events| Blogs| Discussions Sign UpLogin

Company addresses non-insecticide treated seed availability

September 26, 2013
By: Rhonda Brooks, Farm Journal Seeds & Production Editor
honeybees
  

DuPont Pioneer is offering Canada farmers an option for non-insecticide treated corn and soybeans for 2014, in light of concerns raised about honeybee health.
 

DuPont Pioneer issued a statement today that it will make non-insecticide treated corn and soybean seed available to Canadian farmers for 2014.

Specifically, the company is providing a neonicotinoid-free option for corn and soybean seed available to farmers there, according to a press release issued by the Canadian Honey Council. The council says that such products have been linked to bee deaths in Ontario and Quebec.

The company reports that for the U.S., "Pioneer is committed to meeting the changing requests of our customers, which includes our seed treatment offerings. At this time, we will continue to use seed treatment and follow best practices for packaging and planting our seed products in the U.S." The statement was attributed to Greg Lamka, DuPont Pioneer Strategy Manager-Seed Applied Tech.

Earlier this month, the company had announced it is making a neonicotinoid-free option for corn and soybean seed available in Canada, according to a press release issued by the Canadian Honey Council. The council says that such products have been linked to bee deaths in Ontario and Quebec.

Bee die-offs in North America are occurring at a significant rate. An annual survey funded by the USDA shows losses of managed honey bee colonies totaled 31.1% during the 2012-13 winter. Bee losses for each of the last six years have averaged 30.5%.

However, Bayer CropScience reports that "the overall number of honeybee colonies worldwide has increased by some 45% over the last 50 years, not decreased."

A joint report issued by the USDA and Environmental Protection Agency last spring cited a complex combination of factors as contributing to bee deaths: habitat loss, declining genetic diversity, poor diet, diseases, parasites—in particular, the Varroa mite—and pesticide exposure.

The latter is one that opponents of commercial agriculture are quick to tout as the main contributor to the problem, especially the neonicotinoid class of insecticides, often referred to as neonics. Despite extensive research by third-party firms, independent of crop protection companies, no concrete link between neonics and the honeybee syndrome Colony Collapse Disorder has been found.

Still, based on concerns about neonicotinoid products, the European Commission placed a partial ban on the use of three pesticides, imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam, for two years, starting in January 2014. The decision was based on a formal peer review by the European Food Safety Authority earlier this year

Likewise, in Canada, the federal Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) and Ontario Ministry of the Environment (MOE) are also evaluating the cause of extensive bee losses, which they report have coincided with corn planting. The assumption that pesticides contributed to the bee deaths has bee keepers in Canada petitioning the government to adopt a neonicotinoid ban similar to the one enacted by the European Commission.

More information on the DuPont Pioneer seed decisions follow.

 

READ MORE
Previous 1 2 Next

See Comments


 
Log In or Sign Up to comment

COMMENTS

No comments have been posted



Name:

Comments:

Receive the latest news, information and commentary customized for you. Sign up to receive the AgWeb Daily eNewsletter today!.

 
 
Enter Zip Code below to view live local results:
bayer
 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions