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Kansas, Oklahoma Winter Wheat Condition Slips, Texas Improves

March 5, 2012
By: Julianne Johnston, Pro Farmer Digital Managing Editor
 
 

According to state crop reports, the hard red winter wheat crops in Kansas and Oklahoma slipped slightly from last week, while Texas wheat conditions improved slightly.

 

 

Crop condition
Very Poor
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Kansas -
03/04/12
3
9
38
43
7
02/27/12
3
8
37
45
7
 
Okla. - 03/04/12
1
8
29
51
11
02/27/12
1
6
26
53
14
 
Texas - 03/04/12
16
23
28
23
10
02/27/12
18
25
26
23
8

 

Here are some of the key observations in the state monthly summaries:

Kansas: The winter wheat crop in Kansas is still looking better than last year due to the mild winter temperatures, but is in need of moisture during the first weeks of emerging from dormancy. Some wheat has begun jointing in the South Central and Southeast Districts. The condition of the wheat crop declined slightly to 3 percent very poor, 9 percent poor, 38 percent fair, 43 percent good, and 7 percent excellent. A year ago, the wheat condition was much worse at 17 percent very poor, 23 percent, poor, 35 percent fair, 23 percent good and 2 percent excellent. Wind damage increased from the previous week to 10 percent light, 4 percent moderate, and 2 percent severe. Producers across Kansas contended with high winds and unseasonably warm temperatures last week while most received only limited precipitation. There were reports of blowing dust in the West Central and Southwest Districts. Unfortunately, the storms that did occur also brought tornados to several locations in central and eastern Kansas. Eleven of the 52 stations recorded greater than half an inch of moisture, led by Eskridge with 1.25 inches, Lawrence with 1.19 inches, and Hutchinson with 1.17 inches. In contrast, 25 of the 52 stations received a tenth of an inch or less. Temperatures were above normal at all but two stations, with most of the South Central and Southeast Districts being 6 degrees or more above normal, and Pittsburg was 10 degrees above normal last week to lead the State. High temperatures ranged from the low 60’s to mid 70’s while lows were still below freezing, mostly in the teens and 20’s. Kansas farmers averaged 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending March 4. Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 11 percent very short, 26 percent short, 60 percent adequate, and 3 percent surplus.

Oklahoma: A storm system early in the week brought high winds, but little precipitation to Oklahoma. Severe wind gusts over 60 mph were recorded in multiple locations across northern Oklahoma, depleting the limited topsoil moisture. A gust of 67 mph was recorded at the Woodward Mesonet station Tuesday evening. Wheat was rated mostly in good condition this past week, with 91 percent rated fair to excellent. However, the conditions varied across the state. Wheat in the panhandle, already stressed from the ongoing drought, was further damaged by the high winds. Most of the state’s wheat crop is in good condition, but with the caveat that more rain is needed to continue normal development. Temperatures were warm mid-week with highs above 80 degrees in multiple locations. Overall temperatures averaged in the 50s, with average highs mostly in the high 60s. Topsoil moisture conditions worsened over the past week and were rated mostly short to adequate. Subsoil moisture conditions were also rated lower this week. Sixty eight percent was rated short to very short, up from 61 percent the week prior. There were 6.3 days suitable for field work. Conditions of wheat and other fall planted crops continued to be rated mostly good, with 11 percent of wheat and 17 percent of rye rated excellent, respectively. Wheat jointing was 22 percent complete, while 31 percent of rye was jointing by Sunday. Oat planting was 76 percent complete by week’s end.

Texas: Most areas of Texas received scattered showers last week with weekly totals mostly ranging from 0.01 to 1 inch. The Trans-Pecos and the Edwards Plateau received little or no precipitation. Across West Texas and the High Plains dry, windy conditions caused blowing dust and topsoil erosion. Dryland winter wheat continued to struggle in much of the High Plains and the Trans-Pecos. Irrigated fields made good progress. In most other areas of the state, wheat and oat crops showed improvement due to moisture and warmer temperatures. Wheat producers were top dressing fields. Cattle were moved off of fields that producers plan to harvest.


 

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RELATED TOPICS: Weather, Wheat, USDA

 
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