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Short Crop Could Complicate Leases, Rent Payments

August 8, 2012
Land for Lease
  

Low crop yields from this year's drought could mean an inability of some farmers to meet farmland rental agreements if they suffer major losses of income.

By Jennifer Stewart, Purdue University

The possibility means tenants and landlords need to communicate with one another and both parties need to review the terms of lease agreements.

 

"The ability to meet rent payments will vary widely among tenants due to the differing financial impacts of the 2012 drought," said Chris Hurt, Purdue Extension agricultural economist.

 

Contributing factors include final crop yields, final grain prices, the amount of production that is forward-contracted, level of crop insurance coverage, if any, whether there is livestock involved, and a producer's financial strength heading into the 2012 drought.

 

But regardless of financial circumstances, Purdue Extension agricultural economist Gerry Harrison said tenants and landlords are legally locked into lease agreements.

 

"The law is clear on the duty to perform under a contract," he said. "A cropland lease, oral or written, is a contract."

 

A tenant's overall financial position will couple with the type of lease agreement to determine whether rent can be paid and what options tenants and landlords have. Common lease agreements include crop sharing, straight cash rent or a variation of the two.

 

"If it is a crop share lease, the landowner is in a similar position to the tenant," Harrison said. "If the lease is a 'flex' lease, what is the flex provision? If the flex is based on crop yield, the lack of yield may remove any liability the tenant has, based on the flex provision.

 

"If the flex lease is based on price for the crop, the tenant with a short crop may have a serious problem."

 

Under Indiana law, a landlord can terminate a lease with 10 days' notice if a tenant doesn't pay rent when due, unless both parties agree otherwise or if the tenant pays the rent in full within the notice period.

 

"At the very least, some flexibility in non-payment of rent by the due date might be needed this year until a crop insurance payment or a loan becomes available to the tenant," he said.

 

Harrison has a free publication that provides an in-depth look at the legalities of farmland leases in Indiana: "Legal Aspects of Indiana Farmland Leases and Federal Tax Considerations."

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RELATED TOPICS: Weather, Farm Business, Land, drought

 
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COMMENTS (1 Comments)

lilabel
I have recently ran into this scenario, oral or written contracts in Wisconsin are worthless. Last year a landlord rerented and destroyed the crop we had planted, we tryed recovering our losses in court, Judge sided with owner because it is his land to use and see fit as he wanted and said it was ridiculous to make money on the backs of others, I showed judge state law, he said this is my court room and i make the rules. that was a oral agreement, this year a written lease the landlord took our rent money and then 2 weeks ago rented to another farmer and dug our crops up because they looked awful.basically, there is no law, its up to who the judges favor.
4:59 PM Aug 8th
 



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