Spring Wheat CCI Reflects Slight Deterioration

July 15, 2013 10:31 AM
 

 

Below we plug USDA's weekly crop condition ratings into our weighted (by production) Pro Farmer Crop Condition Index (CCI; 0 to 500 point scale). The data shows that the condition of the crop declined by around 3 points from last week to 373.54 points, which compares to 366.99 last week.

Pro Farmer Crop Condition Index

Spring Wheat

7/14/13

7/07/13

7/15/12

Idaho *(8.56%)

31.66
32.26
30.80

Minnesota (14.19%)

51.51

52.37

52.26

Montana (16.98%)

65.02

62.13

52.71

N. Dakota
(43.48%)

166.11

170.46

169.98

S. Dakota
(8.61%)

30.30

30.82

31.65

Washington (5.94%)

20.55

20.49

20.97

Spring wheat total

373.54

376.98

366.99

(Palmer Drought Index below text.)

* denotes percentage of total national spring wheat crop production.

Following are details from USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) state crop and weather reports:

North Dakota: For the week ending July 14, 2013, temperatures continued above normal across the state which sped up ripening of small grains, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. However, the hot temperatures are rapidly drying soils and moisture is needed in many parts of the state to aid row crop development. Statewide, there were 5.7 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 2 percent very short, 21 short, 67 adequate, and 10 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 1 percent very short, 13 short, 76 adequate, and 10 surplus. Field Crops Report: Spring wheat jointed was at 89 percent, behind last year at 100 and 97 average. Headed was 62 percent, well behind 99 last year and 72 average. Turning color was 2 percent, also well behind last year at 50 and 15 average. Condition rated 1 percent very poor, 4 poor, 21 fair, 60 good, and 14 excellent.

Montana: The weather during the week ending July 14th was hot with some scattered storms. There were reports of hail in some areas of the State. Glendive received the highest amount of precipitation for the week with 1.82 inches of moisture. Most other stations reported receiving none to 1.71 inches of precipitation. High temperatures ranged from the upper 80s to low 100s, with the state-wide high temperature of 103 degrees recorded at Miles City. A majority of stations reported lows in the low 40s to the low 50s with the coldest being West Yellowstone at 32 degrees. Both topsoil and subsoil moisture ratings were above last year and the 5 year average. Topsoil moisture is 63 percent adequate and surplus compared with 27 percent last year and the 5 year average of 55 percent. Subsoil moisture was 65 percent adequate and surplus compared to 39 percent last year and the 5 year average of 60 percent. The weather outlook for July 22nd through July 28th is for near normal temperatures and above normal precipitation east of the Great Divide. West of the Divide can expect near normal temperatures and below normal precipitation. Normal temperatures for this period in Montana are highs in the upper 70s to the upper 80s, with lows in the lower 40s to 60 degrees. Crop progress advanced during the week due to the higher temperatures. Most crop progress is ahead of the 5 year average but behind last year.

Minnesota: Warm weather continued across Minnesota during the week ending July 14, 2013 and most of the state received measurable precipitation according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. A statewide weekly average of 1.16 inches of rain fell, with amounts ranging from just over half an inch in north central Minnesota to almost 3 inches in south central Minnesota. Despite the rainfall, 5.7 days were suitable for field work statewide, the second most of any week this crop year. Temperatures averaged 2.5 degrees above normal at 72.2 degrees statewide. Oats, barley and spring wheat all saw significant increases in percent heading. Spring wheat led the way by advancing 22 percentage points to 87 percent headed.

South Dakota: For the week ending July 14, 2013, timely rain in most areas of the state and above normal temperatures improved crop development last week, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. However, portions of western South Dakota are in need of moisture. Haying is in full swing across most areas of the state. Statewide, there were 5.8 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 5 percent very short, 18 short, 70 adequate, and 7 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 8 percent very short, 20 short, 66 adequate, and 6 surplus. Spring wheat headed was 97 percent, behind last year at 100 but near 94 average. Turning color was 21 percent, well behind 98 last year and 46 average. Condition rated 7 percent very poor, 6 poor, 27 fair, 48 good, and 12 excellent.

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