Aug 20, 2014
Home| Tools| Events| Blogs| Discussions Sign UpLogin

Top Tips to Prevent Combine Fires

October 3, 2011
By: Margy Eckelkamp, Director of Content Development, Machinery Pete
 
 

Combine fires can cause devastating damage. Take these simple steps to do your part to prevent them.

Electrical systems:
  • Keep wiring and fuses in proper operating condition and position.
  • Properly route and insulate all replacement wires.
  • Use heat-resistant insulation.
 
Fuel systems:
  • Regularly inspect fuel lines.
  • Keep fuel lines in good condition with tight connections.
  • When refueling, always shut off the engine and let the equipment cool for 15 minutes before you refuel.
  • Never fill the gasoline supply tank near an open flame, while smoking, or with the engine running.
  • Wipe up oil and fuel spills as they occur. This prevents chaff and trash from collecting and combining to start a fire.
 
Mechanical operation:
  • Use a pressure washer or a compressed air blowgun to thoroughly clean the machine.
  • Remove excess crop residue from rotating units.
  • Always inspect the machine for buildup of harvest materials (chaff and leaves) before operation.
  • Keep your work area clean.
  • Check lubricant levels often, and grease fittings regularly. Fix leaking oil, fuel, or hydraulic lines promptly. Check belts for proper tension and wear to reduce friction.
  • Carefully check bearings for excessive heat. Overheated bearings are a major cause of combine fires.
  • Check valve covers for oil leaks that can ignite as oil runs down manifolds.
  • Check for cracked or loose exhaust pipes, ports and check the manifold.
  • Pay particular attention to the exhaust system, checking for leaks, damage, or an accumulation of crop residue.
 
In the field:
  • Put out any fire immediately.
  • Always have a fire extinguisher within reach.
  • Keep at least one fully charged 10-lb. ABC fire extinguisher on all equipment. (Or carry two: one in the cab and one where it can be reached from the ground.)
  • Visually check your extinguishers monthly, looking for cracks in the hose and inspecting the gauge to see if the extinguisher is fully charged.
  • Have a professional fire extinguisher company inspect your fire extinguishers annually.
  • Carry your cell phone or two-way radio with you at all times so you can summon help.
  • If a fire does occur, CALL 911 FIRST, and then attempt to extinguish the fire by pulling the pin on the fire extinguisher and squeezing the handles together. Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire and sweep from side to side. Remember P.A.S.S., which stands for Pull, Aim, Squeeze, Sweep.
 
Learn more at these online resources:

See Comments


 
Log In or Sign Up to comment

COMMENTS

No comments have been posted



Name:

Comments:

Receive the latest news, information and commentary customized for you. Sign up to receive the AgWeb Daily eNewsletter today!.

 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions