Sep 16, 2014
Home| Tools| Events| Blogs| Discussions Sign UpLogin


MGEX Research

RSS By: Joe Victor, AgWeb.com

Joe Victor is a Business Development Specialist with Minneapolis Grain Exchange, Inc., where he monitors cash grain activity and cash grain opportunities. He provides marketing advice through this blog.

You be the Judge

Mar 04, 2010
 
When you look at the last National Agriculture Statistics Service’s crop progress report it suggest there remained 621,000,000 bushels to be harvested of the 2009 corn crop. USDA estimates the 2009 corn harvest at a record 13.151 billion bushels which suggest 4.7% has yet to be harvested.
The vast majority needs to be harvested in the northwest cornbelt which includes Nebraska, Minnesota, South Dakota and North Dakota. Just two weeks ago I saw first hand how the corn in southern Minnesota is standing well with conditions deteriorating as we approached Carrington, ND. Allendale Inc suggest USDA may need to trim 62 million bushel from its end stock projections because of field loss.
The question remains do these four northwest cornbelt states matter to the big picture of harvesting the 2009 and planting the 2010 corn crops?
As you are to view via the graph, it is our opinion these states do matter to the big equation of harvest and planting.
We hear about how moisture and test weight are improving as the 2009 corn crop continues to be harvested, but we are interested in your personal comments.
Our own visual inspection concurs there remains a multitude of problems especially in the heaviest of snow pack regions where ears of corn are under snow. 2010 corn planting is likely to be problematic in the tri-state region of MN, SD and ND as they need to dodge flooding, harvest the 2009 corn crop, fertilize and then plant the 2010 crop into what is forecasted as the slowest of corn plantings.
Already the trade is discussing the possibility of fewer corn and more oilseed plantings for 2010. How could less corn and more soybeans alter your 2010 marketing plans? Allendale Inc suggest option strategies may be your best alternative now not later, please call for trading strategies.
 
We welcome your questions and comments.........Joe Victor
 
 
Allendale Inc welcomes any questions you may have by calling 800-551-4626 or
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The thoughts expressed and the basic data from which they are drawn are believed to be reliable but cannot be guaranteed. Any opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice. Hypothetical or simulated performance results have certain inherent limitations. Simulated results do not represent actual trading. Simulated trading programs are subject to the benefit of hindsight. No representation is being made that any account will or is likely to achieve profits or losses similar to those shown. Commodity trading may not be suitable for recipients of this publication. This is not a solicitation of the purchase or sale of any commodities. Those acting on this information are responsible for their own actions. Any republication, or other use of this information and thoughts expressed herein without the written permission of Allendale, Inc., is strictly prohibited. Allendale Inc. c2010
 
Log In or Sign Up to comment

COMMENTS (5 Comments)

Anonymous
Just look back to Lanworth's numbers, a hell of a lot truer than USDA>
10:13 PM Mar 12th
 
Anonymous
3:44 pm I agree but not break any support levels in front of WASDE
5:51 PM Mar 5th
 
 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions