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Read the latest crop reports from the fields across America! Also, submit your own comments.

December Crop Comments

Jan 02, 2009
Use this link to send us your comments about the crops in your local area.  Be sure to send us your photos and videos! Comments will be edited for brevity and clarity.

What's happening in your fields? Has bad winter hit your area? What were your best yields? Have you planend your crop mix for next year? Send us your photos and video!

Here's a sampling of what some folks are saying:

  • 12/31 - Stearns County, Minnesota: My local co-op told me $400 ton urea.  I told him shove it where the sun don't shine.  I'll plant corn where I have enough manure and soybeans on the rest.  My P and K levels are high anyway.  
     
  • 12/31 - Buena Vista County, Northwest Iowa (Iowa Bob): Bean yields were mostly in the 50's up to the 60 area this year in the fields that didn't drown any out, which is good for this area. Corn was also decent where it didn't drown out, poorer fields at 160 and better ones up close to 200 whole field yields. Been seeing and hearing about Fertilizer prices dropping like a rock BUT not at our suppliers around here they filled up with the high priced stuff. They messed up by doing so just like I did by not selling much Corn or Soybeans at the higher prices, I'll buy there high priced Fertilizer if they buy my Grain at the high for the year. That would be fair. So far not going to plant any corn on corn going back to 50-50 rotation unless fertilizer drops 50 % here. 

     
  • 12/31 - Livingston County, Illinois: We plant anywhere in ILL.
     

    -- Livingston County, Illinois

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)

 


  • 12/30 - LaSalle County, Illinois: With a late harvest and high input costs. It will take a much higher corn price to convince us to plant corn. We have been planting corn on corn for many years, therefore our bean yields should be very strong. Just going to order seed for both and decide when we see a clearer picture.  
     
  • 12/30 - Southeast Missouri:Last year 7,200 cotton, 800 rice, this year 3,800 cotton, 4,200 beans. All acres irrigated. I love cotton but 10 dollar beans [or higher, some contracted] against loan rate cotton is dragging us away from cotton even on land that produces some of the best yields in the delta. 

  • 12/29 - Miami County, Kansas (town of Bucyruss): My corn this year stood tall and all good, and it dried out nicely as well, thank you for all your input, it’s paid off for sure.  
     
  • 12/29 - Audrain County, Missouri:Three of us went to a crop refresher meeting on the 21st in Audrain County, Mo. This was a non roundup ready soybean session to show us our options for 2009. There are lots of disgruntled farmers in our area with the price increases in soybean seed!! 

     
  • 12/29 - Martin County, Indiana: Well we finally finished corn harvest on Dec. 23rd in the freezing rain. What a year. We would have been done two weeks ago if the combine wouldn't have caught fire. Then the insurance company drug their feet in settling up with us. So we got our new combine last Saturday and shelled Sunday through yesterday with the Gleaner A85. It’s a hog!! 22,000 bushels of 20% corn in basically two days because Tuesday we had only 5 acres to shell because we had to make the gap in the wood line bigger to get the combine through it. A85 is a lot bigger than the 1680 and 2188 that burnt. Well hope everyone has a great Christmas!! 

  • 12/29 - Franklin County, Missouri: The insurance adjuster stopped by to settle the claim on the beans.  Meramec River took most of them. The state grading yielded over 40% damage. Fortunately I had 60% guarantee. I think they would have made 35 bushel after a rough spring getting them in.  The corn was high enough that the water didn't get on many of the ears and it didn't get knocked down when the river left. The state grading showed only 3% damage. It went into the bin at 15% and probably made 175 bu. good for around here. Have a good holiday.  
     
  • 12/29 - Umatilla County, Oregon, Northeast of Pendleton: Snowpack about 16 inches. Temperatures have ranged from -7 to mid 20’s most of the past ten days. Ground is NOT frozen under the snow, so if we get a reasonably slow warming trend, we should save most of the moisture in the snow. On the other hand, if it warms up rapidly with warm winds and rain, we will undoubtedly experience more erosion than in any year since 1996.

    Our wheat stand varies widely among farms. Those that gambled on deep seeding early in the planting period have wheat almost 4-6 inches tall, and well rooted.  Those farmers who waited for rain, or dusted in their what have smaller than normal wheat under the snow, not well rooted, but it should survive the snow well, unless we get freezing rain on top of the snow. Ice over snow cover is not a good environment for small wheat, if those conditions last too long. This smaller wheat will also be subject to severe damage if we get cold north winds after the snow melts.

    Generally, with the CRC price guarantee so high for the 2009 wheat crop, few farmers are greatly concerned about crop conditions at this time. On the other hand, most are concerned whether the new Administration will take a hard shot at government payments, including crop insurance subsidies, for example, in order to re-prioritize federal spending for 2009. If this should reduce crop insurance proceeds materially, every farmer here will be “very upset”, to say the least.


  • 12/24 - Lee County, Iowa: Snow in Iowa.
     

    -- Lee County, Iowa

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)

     

  • 12/23 - Wood County, Northwest Ohio: We received about a 1/2 inch of ice Friday, Dec 19. The ice is still on the trees and have had some power outages along with high winds Sunday. Was -2 this morning. This picture was taken from my house overlooking the Portage River. Crops in this area were generally fair 120-180 corn and 35 would be the tops for beans. Always next year.
     

    Wood County, Ohio

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)


     
  • 12/23 - Elgin, Nebraska: Here are a couple of photos on our farm near Elgin, NE.
     

    Rick Schuchardt, Elgin, Neb.

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)


     

  • 12/22 - Show Us Your Winter Photos!: Do you have any good winter photos, such as these from Pam Smith, Farm Journal Seeds & Production Editor? She took these last winter near her central Illinois home. Email your photos or video to cropcomments@agweb.com

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)


     
  • 12/22 - Lamb County, Texas: I lost 2/3 of my dryland cotton crop this spring due to high winds and drought.  Replanted to milo with resulting yields of about 2500#/acre.  Remaining cotton did well with dryland yields of about 550 to 760#/acre and prices averaging about $0.57/#. Irrigated cotton yields were average to below slightly about 1700#/acre with below average prices of about $0.47/# due to low micronare from crop immaturity and barky grades due to stalk condition at harvest. My peanut crop did well, 4575#/acre (Spanish variety), my irrigated wheat looks poor and my dryland wheat has not germinated. I have not purchased any seed or fertilizer for 2009. Hope to be hit with inspiration soon!!  Merry Christmas from Littlefield, Texas!!

     
  • 12/22 - Miami/Fulton Counties, North Central Indiana: We have our seed purchased for 2009. We plan on the time tested 50/50 corn/soybean rotation. We are specialty corn growers. No purchase of fertilizer yet other than we are applying hog manure from a couple of "quads" down the road. Our longest haul is a little over a mile.We plan on a mix of pre-plant anhydrous and side dress 28%. We will use about 100 lbs of 10-34-0 w/micros at planting, put down pre-emerge herbs. w/10 gals of 28%, and put some 0-0-60 on in the spring. We are liming right now based on grid sampling.

  • 12/19 - Lancaster County, Nebraska: I would say a 50/50 rotation between corn and beans next year in this area maybe some switch to beans will depend on prices for crops and inputs come spring, not much corn on corn planted in this area.  Fall NH3 went on as usual with maybe 75-80% of normal getting on before winter set in. Dirt work needed everywhere due to excessive rains and storm damage this summer but with late harvest and ground freezing early all work needed didn't get done. Basis on grain narrower than we've seen in quite a while but no selling going on. 

     
  • 12/19 - Bremer County, Iowa: Most finished before Thanksgiving, some of the big guys were cutting it close. Some NH3 was applied, but not nearly as much as previous years. Finalized seed orders the other day, and have my P&K and NH3 still locked in from Spring of 08. It was a risk back then, but so far I am still cheaper than the current prices.  Plan to fertilize corn on corn, and maybe skip corn on soy acres.  Cash rents are still way to high considering what prices did; it’s a real train wreck in the making. Happy holidays.

     
  • 12/19 - Lawrence County, Alabama: We installed GPS equipment on my tractors this year. I mapped all of my fields and took a lot of soil samples by zones with help of my old cotton (now corn and bean) consultant. Total acreage is 4600 and by just treating the zones used a total of 40 tons of DAP and 25 tons of Potash. I put out about 2000 tons of Lime and I am finished with the 4600 acres. Nitrogen can’t go on here in the winter. I hope this is the best way to go, seems to make since just putting the nutrients where they are needed. I will try to verify with the yield monitor next fall. DAP was 900.00/ ton now around 600.00. Nitrogen is falling, have not fixed a price on it yet. I have purchased my corn seed with the condition that I can change to soybeans or cotton with a credit of the same amount of money. I hope this economy gets better soon and prices offer us a chance to make some money.(Tremendous RISK). Merry Christmas from the land of used to be cotton.  

  • 12/18 - Northeast North Dakota: We checked fert. prices today. Urea quoted at $380/ton, or $.41/lb actual N  That's a long way from the $1100/ton NH3 ($.67/lb actual N)  we paid for in August and didn't get the opportunity to put on this fall. Phosphates that were at $1125, now about $680 in our local market.  I guess buying inputs at too high a price isn't really any different than putting grain in the bin and watching prices fall. I hope that's the only mistake I make for 2009. Crop mix for 2009 will be about the same, with 50% in wheat and barley, 25% in oil seeds (canola and sunflowers) and 25% legumes (peas and dry beans), maybe a little flax, but NO corn. Bought some fuel last week at $1.72.  Much of eastern North Dakota went into winter with a completely saturated soil moisture profile, receiving about 18 inches of rain from late August until freeze up. We are praying for an open winter, and an early, warm spring.  Merry Christmas... 

     
  • 12/18 - Tippecanoe County, Indiana: Very little fertilizer applied in this area thus far. Cash rent contracts are being cancelled. Why would a banker lend you money with these current input costs and local corn priced under $3.00? There is a lot of seed corn available at $250 a bag who can afford it!!

     
  • 12/18 - Shelby County, Illinois: Corn yields very good, stood good. Bean yields were average. We put nh3 on at prepay of 940-only 1 field of dry applied on the bank farm(they wanted it on now) We are waiting for the price to go down to spread the rest or just skip a year. Merry Christmas!!!!!!!  

  • 12/17 - Queen Anne's County, Maryland: We just finished our bean crop.... by mowing it. Our last field was averaging less than 2 bushels per acre so we stopped and called our crop insurance agent to make sure we didn't have to burn all that fuel to harvest nothing. Thankfully not. We're going to have crop insurance claims this year, INCLUDING on irrigated ground. We had a little over 3 inches of measurable rain between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Our bean AVERAGE was 23 bu/ac, our dryland corn AVERAGE was 90 bu/ac, with irrigated coming in at 110 bu/ac. 

     
  • 12/17 - Southern Shelby County, Illinois: Finally done the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. Yields were OK I guess, some better then others, the stand was the main thing. Next to last field, 40 acres, took 7 days using a corn reel I borrowed from a neighbor. Even with the reel most was one way harvesting, just wouldn't feed in going west. All our beans are no-till and due to the late planting, first couple weeks of June, almost no growth, I assume from soil compaction due to the excessive rain. Beans seemed at a standstill for over a month, yields were surprising, considering the shortness of the plants, yields average to a little above. Corn yields were average to a little above as well. Moisture ran from 16 to 20 percent with the exception of the last field, planted in mid June, harvested at 28-29 percent, I was just thrilled that it made a black layer, yielded 100. Bigger operators got most fall work done, running more then one chisel, really helped them out. Not a lot of AA applied normally if the fall, AA running $1000, Potash $900 and DAP $1100. Definitely don't want another late year like this for a long time. 

  • 12/16 - Cass County, North Dakota: It took forever (finished Dec. 11) and it was wet (21-25% moisture) but it was also the best corn crop I’ve ever harvested with field averages from 165-210 bu/a across 2500 acres.  That’s pretty good for North Dakota.  I’m glad to be done and glad for a good year.  Merry Christmas! 

     
  • 12/16 - Ottertail County, West Central Minnesota: -40 below windchill today! To the farmer with the concerns on nitrogen stabilizer for liquid nitrogen or hog manure: Ask for a product call Agrotain plus, is a dry formulation that you mix with the manure. We have seen a 2-10 bushel response versus no treatment.

  • 12/15 - Watanwan County Minnesota: I have driven around Midwest; trucking since finishing field work; where are all the corn piles? 

     
  • 12/15 - Nelson County, Northeast North Dakota: Finished combining and drying corn on Friday, Dec. 12. 30% corn before Thanksgiving was 25% when we finished. Lots of wind and below freezing temperatures after Thanksgiving. Average to below average yields, high cost. Low test weights. I'd guess that 10% of corn is still in the fields in this area. Some guys without dryers are hoping for less than 46 lb. test weights and Federal Crop Insurance. Big blizzard and below zero temperatures for the next week might be the end of harvest here. We're lucky to be done. Merry Christmas. 

     
  • 12/15 - Calhoun County, Iowa: Crop is harvested. We have excess corn in piles at the elevators in this area of the state. Many producers decided to let the coops deal with the wet corn as this year’s crop never dried down much below 18-20% on the full season varieties. Many of those piles are already experiencing heat damage. Yields were all over the map depending upon when the corn was planted, when the ground was fertilized and with what product, and if it was corn-on-corn vs. corn-soybean rotation. The poorest yields seem to come from corn-on-corn fall fertilized with hog manure and no stabilizer for the nitrogen. Best yields were on corn-soybean rotations with spring applied hog manure or fall applied anhydrous with a stabilizer for the nitrogen. The earliest planted corn (April 24th) had population issues again this year. Corn planted the first week of May had the best yields.

    Fertilizer prices for this fall and next spring have delayed many applications from occurring. There is a wait and see attitude about what and how much to be put on. The university trials have given us something to consider when it comes to applying P & K this next year. As our Bray tests are high for both, we won’t be applying any P & K. With the availability of a N stabilizer for liquid N this spring, we will again apply liquid N along with a pre-emergence to save on time and trips. It worked for us the past 2 seasons with good yield results even though there wasn’t a stabilizer available for either liquid N or hog manure.

    We are no-till farmers and this year our soybeans broke the 60 bushel yield barrier. We drill in standing corn stalks, spray with Roundup around the 4th of July, spray for aphids around the 22nd of July and harvest. Before we started to go completely no-till, we weren’t able to break 50 bushels per acre. Along with better seed and some help from Mother Nature we have had excellent yields 3 years in a row. The soybean crop in this area was better than any one expected even on their replanted acres. A very late freeze helped those replanted acres fully mature.
    2009 will be a test for input costs. How we hold down those costs will determine the bottom line. Area producers who went out on a limb and contracted acres with inflated cash rents (over $300) will need a major turn around in the markets (if they haven’t locked in their 2009 sales before September 2008) to survive. Banks are already seeing some red ink in some 2009 cash flow statements. 

     
  • 12/15 - Henry County, Illinois: There is still corn out here and there. Coming out at 25%. It was drier earlier but has picked up moisture with snow and rain events every 2 or 3 days. Went to Carbondale last weekend and there was a lot of corn being picked south of Litchfield. They were wet early, late planted and then got tail end of the hurricane. I saw a lot of corn reels. This cannot be adding to national yield. 

     
  • 12/15 - San Saba County, Texas (just east of McCulloch): Central Texas has turned into the desert. Spotty wheat stands, running out of grass and few dry land pecans. 

  • 12/12 - Northeast Kansas:We finished corn the Saturday before Thanksgiving.  After FSA got all the bins measured our yields were "ho-hum" on corn and a bit below average on soybeans.  We had little rain in August which "dinged" the soybeans.  Our best soybean yields were our first planted (May 4-5) and last planted (Memorial Day)?  All in all not a bad year. We've turned numbers into our insurance agent and he says we'll get some of our premium back through CRC.   We'll try to learn from this and go on as we always do. We did get some fall work done over the Thanksgiving weekend. The weather since then has not permitted any tillage. We are playing the wait and see game for fertilizer next year.  We've not bought anything nor have we put any on except for some hog manure. Our seed is purchased. At this point we are sticking with our corn/soybean rotation.  We raise Waxy corn for that market and the premium is pretty good for next year.  We have a few '08 corn and soybean contracts to get filled before the end of the year.  Why didn't we sell it all plus our neighbor's and our neighbor's, neighbor?  We're putting numbers together for the accountant. Set back relax a little enjoy the holiday.  Merry Christmas. 

     
  • 12/12 - Nobles County, Manitoba: We had a wind come through in Nov. that had gust up to 50 mph on a Sun. We combined all that day and could not find sheltered spots to get our tarps rolled back and forth on out semis. We figure we lost between 10 and 30 bu. per acre as the stalks were broke over and then we got a rain snow mix on top of the broke over corn, which made it impossible to pick up the broke over stalks that were lying down on the ground! The test weight was between 53.8 and 57 pounds, with moisture averaging 17.5 to 18 %. This knocked our yields considerably. Beans in our area ran between 30 and 50 bu. with 40 to 45 bu. the top end of most farms. Bean plants got enough beans to keep them running but are trying to break some loose from farmers by narrowing the basis to 16 to 19 cents. I don't know where all the beans are that USDA says we have. Tucked away waiting for the price to recover so they can get 9 dollars? Rumors from people in the know are saying farmers as a whole only had 20% or less contracted on 2008 crop! Also, of interest is how VeraSun can make farmers deliver grain and take market price and not honor their contracted price. Most farmers are in a stupor over the increase in cash rent and fertilizer and seed and other input cost and a price that has dropped over 50%. I think everyone should be praying to the Lord for this financial debacle to end. Cash flows do not work at all!!! Hang in there the Lord will provide! 

     
  • 12/12 - Scottsbluff County, Nebraska: Still harvesting corn in Scottsbluff County, NE. Still in the low 20's for moisture. Merry Christmas. 

     
  • 12/12 - Martin County Indiana: We were hoping to wrap up harvest today but the combine had different plans it caught fire with about twenty acres left this afternoon. The season has been a long one 2 floods this year then a wind storm that blew all the late corn flat and now to top it all off the combine burns to the ground. 

     
  • 12/12 - Brown County, Northeast South Dakota: My brother and nephew finally finished harvest yesterday, December 10.  Most of the harvest is nearly finished is this area, however some corn still to pick. Had over 12 inches of rain after September 1.  Terrible wind storm on July 31 caused some cornfields to have over 80% loss.  We had corn yields anywhere from 40 to 140.  Beans made 30-39.  Hope next year is not quite as hectic. 

     
  • 12/12 - Northwest Iowa:I’m driving around western Iowa, if our corn crop is so large where are all the big corn piles that are usually on the ground? I think maybe the USDA missed the boat AGAIN. Yields were good on corn, not great, soybean's were less than average. Tell me if there are big grain piles in the rest of the Midwest. Merry Christmas. 

  • 12/11 - Fulton/Miami counties, North Central Indiana:We finished corn the Saturday before Thanksgiving.  After FSA got all the bins measured our yields were "ho-hum" on corn and a bit below average on soybeans.  We had little rain in August which "dinged" the soybeans.  Our best soybean yields were our first planted (May 4-5) and last planted (Memorial Day)?  All in all not a bad year. We've turned numbers into our insurance agent and he says we'll get some of our premium back through CRC.   We'll try to learn from this and go on as we always do. We did get some fall work done over the Thanksgiving weekend. The weather since then has not permitted any tillage. We are playing the wait and see game for fertilizer next year.  We've not bought anything nor have we put any on except for some hog manure. Our seed is purchased. At this point we are sticking with our corn/soybean rotation.  We raise Waxy corn for that market and the premium is pretty good for next year.  We have a few '08 corn and soybean contracts to get filled before the end of the year.  Why didn't we sell it all plus our neighbor's and our neighbor's, neighbor?  We're putting numbers together for the accountant. Set back relax a little enjoy the holiday.  Merry Christmas. 

     
  • 12/11 - McCulloch County, Texas: I finally finished my below average cotton harvest and finished planting 1800 acres of wheat yesterday. "0" of my wheat acres have any sign of emerging. 

  • 12/10 - Northeast North Dakota: I hand shelled some corn over the weekend.......still 32% moisture, 46 test weight, and still in the field......where it might stay for a long time yet.  Some are trying to finish their corn regardless of moist. levels.   The propane trucks are making as many trips as the grain trucks.  Many acres of corn left in the state, but some is coming off. Combines should be put away before the Christmas lights go up. 

     
  • 12/10 - Huron County, Midwestern Ontario: Corn harvest has virtually come to a halt because of heavy snowfall over the last three weeks.In many cases there is two or more feet of snow in corn fields To the south about 5-15 % left to be harvested and to the north 25-50%.In general yields have been above average with good quality and good to excellent standablity.  

  • 12/09 - Northwest Ohio: Beans were bad to terrible. Corn was fair, but we have had better. Our worst bean yields in 40 years. 

  • 12/05- Coles County, East-Central Illinois: Close to 50% of NH3 was put on in my area, but not in the best conditions. Prices for corn under $3.00, but need $3.70 or more just to cover input cost for 2009 crop. The looming farm crisis may beat out the housing crisis and the Wall Street crisis and the auto industry crisis in 2009 because people can't eat houses, stocks & cars. Watch your bins. With all the mold on the cobs this year, your corn may be peppered with moldy kernals in your bins and can go out of condition fast. Happy holidays!

  • 12/04 - South-Central Minnesota: Hard to find any corn left. Some were done a month ago and some just finished before the snow over Thanksgiving. Corn yields were good but not great, and varied quite a bit.  Beans were disappointing. Groung froze early with some not getting tillage done. This will limit corn on corn for next year. Some dry fertilizer was spread, but very little NH3  applied. Ground just froze too quickly. Coop people say fertilizer prices won't come down. Don't know if a guy should bevieve them or not. Right now looks like we should have rented our ground out for 09 and took the year off.

  • 12/03 - Decatur County, Indiana: The season has been wrapped up for a while and everyone has their winter wheat planted. Our county is getting affected similar to many counties across the nation with the REX Gas pipeline that is running across a vast part of America. It will be interesting the see the how quickly they are out and how much affect they have on fields. Only time will tell. 

  • 12/02 - Saline County, Northeastern Nebraska: Harvest is over here. Has been a different kind of year. Lots of moisture early, had a struggle to get the corn and beans planted. We were about two weeks behind normal. Had enough moisture most of the growing year, but with it had lots of hail. 100% on about  200 acres of beans. Corn not so bad, but still cut yields greatly. I'd say dryland corn yield from 120 to 180. Beans from 40 to 50 bpa. Now we need the grain price to recover. Can't get 3.00 for corn at our local cc-op. Glad I contracted  some grain, but not enough. Merry Christmas!

  • 12/02 - Cimarron County, Oklahoma: Still in a severe drought here. What wheat made it up is suffering now. We have been in a drought for at least 10 years and it is not getting better. Most of the milo was disastered out and what wasn’t was 5-6 bu/ acre. I watched the Weather Channel Sunday about the Dust Bowl. And if it were not for CRP grass, this county would look like it again due to the winds this last spring and prolonged drought. Some of the wheat is not up still. May have to irrigate to keep fields alive. That is not profitable at these prices. Nothing at these price levels are worth the risk vs. reward of planting. Do you want to take a chance of putting $500 a day worth of fuel into your tractor again? Not worth the risk at these prices. Really having a difficult time deciding what to do. I'm seriously considering a milo crop for low inputs.


  •  12/01 - Winona County, Southeast Minnesota: Beans stood well this year. Beans ran from 20 bu to 70 bu per acre. Averaged 49 bu on 750 acres.  I saw some top die down and a bit of white mold.  200 of these acres were hailed on twice. Corn stood well also this year. Started @ 28-30% and finished @ 17%. Yields ran from 120 bu to 200+ bu per acre. Averaged 174 bu on 750 acres. 220 of these acres were hailed on and also wind damaged. The quality of the ground was relative to the yield this year in a big way. All contracts are filled and the bins are full. We were short on rain last half of August-September-October…could have been a bin buster. Corn and beans all reacted maturity prior to the first freeze. I am one of the luck ones to have all my fall tillage done before the ground froze. A lot of the neighbors aren’t as lucky. 95% of the crops are now out of the fields. I have a lot to be thankful for in this crop season.  Happy holidays!

 
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