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Crop Comments

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Read the latest crop reports from the fields across America! Also, submit your own comments.

May Crop Comments

May 28, 2010

Welcome to your one-stop source for wheat information, where wheat producers across the country communicate with each other and provide up-to-date information about their crop.

Keep your acreage, weather and crop comments coming in! Use this link to send us your comments about your wheat production and marketing decisions. Be sure to send us your photos and videos! Comments will be edited for brevity and clarity. (Please keep your comments crop-related.)


Here's a sampling of what some folks are saying

 

  • 8/4 - Ransom County, N.D.: Wheat harvest is under way. Early planted wheat yields were 20% less than the bumper crop of 2009. Quality is excellent and protein levels have been 13.8% to 14.9%. No discounts this year. Basis levels are nearly $1.00/bu. If I sold today, I'd dollar out about the same as last year. Beans and corn look GREAT.

     
  • 8/2 - Livingston/LaSalle Counties, Ill.: I've been a little lax in making comments lately since I ended up destroying 240 of my 250 acres of wheat. We did combine the remaining 10 acres on July 2nd. Yielded right at 40 bu., then double-cropped soybeans. Wasn't really worth keeping, but one never knows. Hope the beans make up the difference. They've had plenty of rain and are growing well. Last year, I planted a total of 500 acres of wheat for myself and custom planting. So far this year, neighbors have contacted me to plant 500 acres, and my own 220. I really feel there will be a lot more planted this fall than the "experts" predict, due to an earlier fall harvest of soybeans than last year and a huge price increase. Hope everyone has a safe harvest!

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  • 7/13 - Ririe, Idaho: Brigham Cook: The wheat in Idaho is progressing. The irrigated crops are completely headed out and looking about average. The dry farm crops are still looking good, though as is always the case in July, a rain would be very beneficial as the areas in the weakest soil are starting to show stress due to lack of water. The progression of the crops is a little behind normal this year. I expect to start harvesting around the 10th-15th of August instead of the 8th. So far, this has been a pretty good growing season, with above-average rainfall early on, but has turned off warm and dry lately. With no further rains, I expect to have an average harvest with dry farm yields between 30 and 35 bu. per acre and irrigated between 100-115 bu. of dark northern spring wheat and 120-140 bu. of hard red winter wheat. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.


  • 7/13 - South Haven, Kan.: Tim Turek: Combines are cleaned up and some are in the shed. About half of the wheat ground has been disked. Hot dry weather and crabgrass growth was making the fields dry and hard, but we received a 4" rain and have been out of the field for several days. This rain was right on time for our row crops that we have planted. Our next wheat project will begin Monday, cleaning seed wheat. I have Robert Henry of Grain Conditioning Inc. coming from Colorado for this work. It will probably take five or six long days to accomplish this task. Samples will be sent to Kansas Crop Improvement after cleaning for testing and final certification. Varieties that my brother and I will have for sale are Jackpot, Art, Tam 203, Everest, Fuller and Endurance. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.
     

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  • 7/12 - Northeast Colorado: Wheat harvest is finally getting underway in NE Colorado.  Early yield reports are in the 40’s and 50’s for bu./ac. Haven’t heard any protein contents yet.  It is about a week later than normal getting started.  Sounds like the weather should be good for the next week so a lot of acres will get harvested.  Areas further south in Colorado are also going with some yield reports as high as the 70’s.  Overall there should be a lot of bushels out of Colorado this year.  I hope everyone has a safe harvest.

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  • 7/12 - Coleharbor, N.D.: Paul Anderson: Applying fungicide to wheat to take care of scab. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.

     

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  • 7/9 - Perkins County, northwest South Dakota, and Adams County, southwest North Dakota (small wheat farmer with planted acres @1,000): Our "early planted spring wheat" (snow still on the ground in late April and early May) looks OK. We completed planting in Perkins County prior to May 15. We completed two quarters in Adams County by month's end. We were unable to plant two other quarters, so the same will be chem fallowed ground. On average, we have all spring planted on or before April 30. My memory is that we have not planted this late since the last part of the 1970s when I started farming.

    The "late planted spring wheat" will need miracle weather to mature for harvest. We have no grain drying system, so a wet fall would make harvest difficult. The hot, dry weather prior to July 4 with high winds was hard on our crop since we had excellent moisture going into planting, but we could use some slow, soaking rains. I have no expectations that the spring wheat we planted in Adams County will yield anywhere close to the average county yield.

    My neighbor's winter wheat in Perkins County looks excellent. I would guess that it could yield between 40 to 50 bu. per acre. I believe that a spring wheat yield might be 20 to 25 bu. per acre if we get some more rain and some average temperatures.

     
  • 6/14 - Northeast Colorado: The wheat crop in this area looks good.  We were just beginning to get a little dry but have received around 1.5” of nice rains the last three nights (6/11 thru 6/13).  It should finish out the wheat and keep the test weights up.  Who knows about the protein?  There has been some strip rust and disease in the area but we have had enough warm weather to keep most of it at bay to be able to let the wheat finish.  Some areas of Colorado were hit be severe weather the last couple days and I certainly feel for those guys.  Everyone have a safe harvest season.

     
  • 6/14 - McPherson, Kan.: There has been wheat cut not too far south of me last week.  I suspect it was still high moisture and run through a bin.  We should be cutting by the end of the week, depending on the weather.  We are forecast for heavy rains the next few days.Local price is down to $3.35 a bushel.  We are getting to the point I may have a revenue insurance claim, even with decent yields.  We'll see.

     
  • 6/14 - Kingfisher County, Okla.: SUNUP's Clinton Griffiths takes a trip to Kingfisher county to check on how wheat harvest is progressing for wheat producer Tom Glazier and his family.


     
  • 6/14 - Briscoe County, Texas: Cotton and corn are off to one of the best starts in years.  All crops look great with no real insect or weather concerns. Wheat harvest has been going for about a week.  Yields and test weights are good but basis is terrible.  A lot of it should have been grazed out.

     
  • 6/11 - Henry County, northwest Ohio: We are all pretty much aware of the challenges that we have faced this spring with too much rain, beans that have not been planted, yellow corn, etc., etc., and to make matters worse the head scab in our wheat is as bad as any that I have ever seen. I estimate at least a 25% loss and of course that depends on average test weight, which looks like a long shot. I have a bad feeling the word vomitoxin will surface at harvest.
     
  • 6/11 - Western Walsh County, northeast North Dakota: Wheat seeding started on April 22 and we finished on June 1st. Harvest will be very spread out… Everything seeded prior to April 29 has been sprayed, and is looking great. All of it was planted on last year's prevent plant cover crop, or pea and bean ground. No leaf disease has showed up yet. We did not include fungicide with the herbicide application because it all looked so clean. But about 400 acres of the later wheat was put back on wheat ground, and now it's raining again, so I know we will be adding Headline to the weed spraying on those fields. Sunshine and market boost would both be welcome. This morning we had wind, rain and 46 degree temps. Last spring we had to leave 30% of the farm in prevent-plant... This year we got every acre planted.

     
  • 6/9 - Texas: While the Rolling Plains and other parts of Texas experienced near-perfect conditions for the wheat harvest, other parts of the state became further parched, according to Texas AgriLife Extension Service personnel. The North, Southeast, Panhandle and nearly all of East Texas remained dry, with dryland crops not growing or stressed due to lack of moisture.
     
  • 6/8 - Hancock County, northwestern Ohio: Head scab and storms are putting the wheat down.

     
  • 6/7 - Grayson County, Texas: Finished up harvest on our 6800 acres of wheat, wow what a great year it was this year. Last year we lost 4550 acres to all the freezing weather and this year the rain and snow helped out. Getting calls everyday to harvest other fields in the area with 11 combines looks like we are going to be busy. Corn is standing about 5 ft tall and some milo is starting to head. Several farmers in our area planted cotton this year and all the fields look good just need some weed control.

     
  • 6/7 - McPherson, Kan.: I am two weeks away from wheat harvest.  We usually start within a couple days of June 20, and it looks about on par.  I am still predicting average yields.  There is disease pressure, but not out of the ordinary.  Cash price is at a contract low of $3.65 and still dropping.I was chatting with a famous wheat breeder at a wheat school is Hayes the other day.  He commented that many people switch to corn when the price difference is less than $1.50.  We are currently only $.80.
     

     
  • 6/7 - Wilbur, Wash.: In the last two weeks I have received over 3.5 inches of rain! It’s been years since we have had one of these weather events.  The pasture grass is still nice and green, and the wheat is looking good.  The spring wheat is growing too and needs to be sprayed now, but too wet to do so! The combines in the shop.  Looks like she will have lots of straw to deal with!

     
  • 6/7 - Sanilac County, Mich.: Comments regarding fungicide research trial and some application recommendations.


 

  • 6/4 - Western Walsh County, northeast North Dakota: We finished wheat and sunflower seeding on June 1. What started out so good turned into a long spring, with several rain delays. About half of the edible beans were planted the past three days, but now we are held up with another rain overnight...only 0.7", enough to make a delay again. The early wheat and canola has been sprayed, but we have a bunch of acres to go over when it's dry again.

    The peas look as good as we have ever had. I also put in 40 acres of lentils...just to see if we can get them to maturity here in the wetter, eastern part of ND, without losing them to diseases. Our plan is to use an agressive fungicide program, spraying on a regular schedule. The legume "pulse crops" have been a big plus for the small grain rotation. They are a good option for us, where the lack of heat units and short growing season  really limits soybean production. This our 15th year of pulse crops in the mix.

    A fungicide will be added to all our herbicide mixes when spraying wheat.

     
  • 6/4 - Southwest Ohio: I talked to several wheat producers across the 30-mile path of our little wheat area yesterday. We are optimistic the wheat will harvest by July 4, our normal goal with decent yields and quality. Cereal leaf beetle larvae reduced some yields, Septoria and Staganospora leaf spots reduced more total yields, with many moderate to severe field ratings. There was not time to get treatments on and no incentive to, at $4 wheat. I think we will average 70 bu. per acre again this year with yields as low as 60 and a few over 100. Scab and quality is still a concern but reduces each day of maturity. There are very few white heads showing in SW Ohio.

    -- Poison Ivy in a southern Ohio wheat field.
     

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)


     
  • 6/4 - Northwest Cherry County, Neb.: Rain delayed corn planting, but lots of days of high winds and we are now really dry. Too dry to dig a post hole on the hard ground. Running pivots nonstop except for the one the wind took out. Corn looks OK, grass and oats are slow with all the cold weather and lack of sunshine.
     
     
  • 6/1 - Lewistown, Mont.: I think most of Montana picked up some pretty good precipitation this Memorial Day week. We had 2 inches here and it sounds like it was pretty general all through eastern Montana, as well. The crops in general look good, but late. Our early seeded spring wheat looks as far along as the winter wheat. I would estimate the winter wheat in our area to be a good 10 days behind normal in maturity. We had started to notice some grasshopper hatches prior to this rain, so hopefully it has put the kibosh on them. Always nice to avoid the hot weather, but the weatherman is forecasting a freeze for tonight, which probably wouldn't hurt us, but the freezing at night is starting to get old.

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  • 5/28 - Sherman, Texas: Chad Wetzel: Wheat is coming along nicely.  Earliest planted wheat should be ready in just a few more days.  Finishing up getting the combines/trucks/grain carts serviced and ready to hit the field.  Approximately 1,500 acres planted this year.  Expecting a pretty good wheat crop this year.  Probably will not be a record breaker, but will definitely be better than last year. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.
     

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  • 5/28 - Vernon, Texas: We have had a wet, cool spring which has been good for the wheat, but bad for diseases. Wheat looks pretty good, I am a little worried about the rust, but it came so late we didn't think we could justify a fungicide application. Wheat was already flowering when it showed up. I think yields will be average, between 40-50 bu/ac. Unless the rust dings it pretty bad. Harvest should be the first couple of weeks of June.

    -- Vernon, Texas
     

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)

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  • 5/28 - South Haven, Kan.: Tim Turek: The wheat in South Central Kansas is progressing on schedule.  We have had several rains over the last couple of weeks, with the last one measuring 1 to 5 inches depending where you were at.  I have managed to dodge most of the hail stones.  The kids are all out of school, and we have been working on harvesting equipment.  We have been rouging fields for feral rye, much to the crew’s dissatisfaction!  Today we had 10 people walking seed wheat fields including my daughters Whitney (15) and Paige (12).  The wheat on corn is showing small signs of head scab, but other than that they looked pretty good.  We will be walking other fields in the next few days to get ready for the seed inspector from Kansas Crop Improvement Association, so I should have a better handle on the wheat condition.  The leaf diseases finally have taken hold with the damp weather, but I think they were late enough not to do too much damage to the untreated fields. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.
     

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  • 5/27 - Blanchester, Ohio: Certified Hopewell SRWW Highland Co Ohio, 80 bu. est yield, moderate to heavy Seporia Leaf Spot, moderate Cereal Leaf Beetle larvae damage.

    -- Blanchester, Ohio
     

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)


     
  • 5/27 - Tioga, Texas: Getting combines ready to hit the fields here around Tioga, TX. Outcome looks good for high yields, 6,800 acres planted, good heads and if rain stays away low moisture. Corn and milo looking great, sprayed corn and milo for weeds, calling for rain later in the week and should help corn and milo but may slow wheat harvest.

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  • 5/25 - Coleharbor, N.D.: Paul Anderson: Wheat is starting to grow. Just sprayed and used our tramline system to minimize traffic patterns. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.

     

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  • 5/25 - Coleharbor, N.D.: Paul Anderson: Planting corn on last year's wheat stubble. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.

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  • 5/24 - Southeast Montana: More rain, they're talking rain through Monday. Spring wheat is finished and about half of it is up and looks good. The early winter wheat looks good. Late winter wheat does not look so hot, it’s all got disease, so we're spraying fungicide. Got safflower left to plant. Hopefully the weather can straighten out for a week to finish up.
     
  • 5/24 - Nuckolls County, Neb.: In response to comments about wheat height from Pottawattamie County, Iowa: I have planted 2,145 in the past, but don’t think your “problem” is variety specific. We also had good snow cover this past year. A lot of wheat is planted no-till after beans. Our wheat looked good last fall and early this spring, but then started showing signs of yellowing and poor growth. I had taken tissue samples of the wheat pre-joint (when it was looking normal) and at flag leaf (after the systems appeared). They revealed adequate to excessive nitrogen early and low nitrogen later. even though the fields were adequately fertilized. I have had university personnel look at the fields, and they cannot find any diseases that are causing the problem. The theory now is that with the residue, snow cover, and excessive early spring rains, the soils became saturated and waterlogged, causing poor root development and consequently, poor uptake of nutrients. I haven’t taken soil samples to determine if the fertilizer leached out, but am inclined to believe that it was the timing of two rain events on the heels of the spring snow melt that caused the problem.
     
  • 5/24 - Williams County, northwest Ohio: It has been 30 days since the corn planter has moved. The driveway to the planter has never dried out to get to the tractor. There’s still plenty of corn to plant. A few beans were planted on May 10 but need replanted. We did get the fungicide on wheat. Good thing sprayer has lots of power. Another rain last night, half inch. More rain tonight. Any thoughts on rice in Ohio?

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  • 5/21 - Sherman, Texas: Chad Wetzel – An update on wheat conditions for our hard red wheat. We’ve had good rain, avoided the hail and everything is looking great so far. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.

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  • 5/21 - South Haven, Kansas: Clearfield wheat, we’re treating for rust and stripe rust. We finally got an inch of rain, and avoided the hail. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.

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  • 5/21 - Richland County, Ill.: The last wheel we turned was April 23rd and it's raining now, the 20th. Took a 100-mile loop last week, could count all the wheat fields on one hand. All headed out. Lot of corn was planted in April, some will be replanted. Like everyone else, we need sun and heat.
  • 5/20 - Pottawattamie County, Iowa: I grow wheat every 2-4 years here in southwest Iowa. We had the big snows of winter, which kept most fields covered, though we did have some exposed areas. My concern is that I have wheat heading now (mid-May) at very short to medium heights. I have never seen wheat start to head at calf to knee height. And, my fields are quite variable in height. Variety is 2145, after decent beans. As we don't have much wheat here, can someone advise me as to whether they have the same "problem" this year?
     
  • 5/20 - Nebraska: Cool, wet conditions have led to the development of stripe rust in eastern Nebraska, with severity levels from minimal to 70%. Damage can destroy a field, thus timely response is advised

    -- University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)



     
  • 5/19 - St. Clair/Madison counties, southwest Illinois: Generally most have received 2-4” of rain the past seven days. A lot of 3-4” totals. For the most part it has come scattered .5" to 1.0" at a time, but the last few fell on saturated soils and it looks like a lot more rain that it actually was. Corn in general looks pretty good. The fields planted before April 20 are mostly 3-5 leaf stage, but growth has slowed with the cool damp conditions. The corn planted the very end of April is around 2 leaf but is showing some water stress in some fields. All of this corn has very good stands with some isolated bird damage and some very limited cutworm feeding. The corn planted a week to 10 days ago is going to have some issues as low areas would seem to be certainly lost. Fortunately, a very high percentage of the corn was in by May 1. I would put corn planting at 99%, but 5% of that may be at risk. Some that elected to sidedress NH3 are probably going to start sweating here before too long if it stays wet. With the sunshine and 90 degree temps predicted Saturday and Sunday, the corn will really take off. About 10% of the beans are planted. At best, many of them will need low areas replanted. I suspect there will be some fields that will need complete replanting. As wet as it is now, we will be doing good to get back into plant beans by the 25th or 26th, and that goal will take some pretty good drying weather to make happen. With significant rain events scheduled the end of this week and the middle of next week, I would say June 10 may be here before we get many beans planted. Most wheat was destroyed, but the few fields remaining look anywhere from marginal to pretty decent. It would appear to be fairly early with a harvest somewhere around June 10-15, depending on the weather the next few weeks.

     
  • 5/18 - Blanchester, Ohio: The soft red winter wheat belt is coming along nicely, what little there is. Some went to corn or soybeans. I am thinking around 800,000 acres in Ohio, after talking to Pierce Paul from OARDC Ohio State Saturday. Seed acres are the lowest recorded, 10,000. The lowest found was 14,000 acres in 1953. The wheat is in Feekes stage 10.5 or beyond now with some flowering in the rain, but the scab concern is the seven days before heading. Time will tell. I will try to get some pictures up soon and a video if possible.

    -- Blanchester, Ohio

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)


 

  • 5/18 - Haxtun, Colo.: Our farm in northeast Colorado received 1” of rain over the last few days. The wheat looks good. Maybe a little small with all of the cool weather we have had so far this spring. The wheat has not stressed yet and disease pressures are very light at this time. If we get a few 75 degree days, it will really take off. We still have good subsoil moisture to carry us for a while. Right now the chance of having an above average crop is still in the cards, but time will tell. From reports I get around the state, a lot of areas look good at this time but some are beginning to need some moisture.
  • 5/17 - Western Walsh county, northeast North Dakota: We were rained out on April 29 and just got back to the field work on Saturday May 15. Crops planted prior to April 29 came up very slowly, but since it's warmed up, they are looking good--at least it's all out of the ground now. We have 1,500 acres of wheat left to seed. The canola will be finished tomorrow, then it's back to the wheat. At the same time, we will putting down chemical and start planting sunflowers, then the edible beans. Looks like the hard red spring wheat handled the cold, wet soils and rain better than other crops that were planted at the same time, but now everything will sprout quickly...so will the weeds. No doubt we will be spraying while finishing up seeding.

     
  • 5/17 - Wilbur, Wash.: Winter wheat in this area looks great! Timely rains and moderate temps are helping. We had a hard frost a week ago two nights in a row that burnt the leaf tips, but I think it was early enough that no yield damage took place. We have a month to go to worry about frost here in the "Big Bend Country," though. Harvest will take place around July 25 south of US 2, about the 1st of August north of US 2. I am betting yields will be 10% above 10-year averages without frost. It's a dry climate here in Lincoln County and long-range forecasts don't call for wet weather to dominate, so rusts and other diseases shouldn't be a problem. Tractors are busy preparing summerfallow, and we are busy getting the sprayers ready for the summer weed season!
     
  • 5/14 - McPherson, Kan.: It is springtime in Kansas. McPherson County had over 4" hail and funnel clouds earlier this week. Fortunately for me, the main storms were south and east of my farm. Most wheat is still in the good to excellent category, although the Kansas Wheat Quality Council Tour a week ago still only put the state estimated yield on par with last year (40.7 bu./acre). That was surprising for those on the tour since the wheat is rated higher than last year, yet that is the number they got as they did actual head and kernel counts across the state. Of course, the weather for the next month always plays a huge role in how the wheat actually fills. There is stripe rust and other diseases, but about what I call normal levels. I am waiting to plant dryland soybeans and milo until after the rain this weekend. 

     
  • 5/13 - Lewistown, Mont.: Weatherman finally has some 70 degree temps in store for us next week. We have had a very cool, windy spring. Several large storm systems passed through central Montana the last couple of weeks, and some local areas in Montana received significant moisture. However, where I farm, 40 miles north of Lewistown, Mont., we have been just getting light showers and lots of wind. Our subsoil moisture is fine, mostly because the wheat crops have been doing very little because of the cold weather. But surface moisture will get short very quickly. I was told that in northeast Montana it is very dry. Definitely too early in our area to predict yields, but all in all, the wheat so far looks pretty good. Just a little worried about the weather pattern that we seem to be in. Wind wind wind...
  • 5/13 - Minto, N.D.: This spring came up on us real quick; we were still dealing with a lot of flooding from the Red River when we got in the field April 7th. Soil conditions were dry and got even dryer through the month, making planting real easy on the nonflooded ground early in the month. The flooded land dried out nicely later in the month, allowing us to get all the wheat in before the rains started the 30th of April. Planting was made even easier by the reduction in acres due to the market conditions. Along with almost all of our neighbors, we redirected land away from wheat into other crops where the markets are favorable. Other than rotational purposes, I can't see any reason why any wheat is getting planted at all; the grain buyers must have a vacation planned during harvest this year or something. With all the sugar beets and wheat in, the 3" we have gotten so far have soaked in real nice, letting the wheat come up evenly for us and looking good; a lot of wheat in the area is emerging uneven or spotty due to the dry conditions this spring, however. The earliest wheat isn't very far from being ready to be sprayed; weed pressure at this point is modest; with the recent rains, I'm sure we will see increased weed pressure. Being in early this year, we are hoping to start harvesting during the hotter days in late July if everything continues to go smoothly

     
  • 5/13 - Scotts Bluff County, Neb.: It began snowing in the Nebraska panhandle a few moments ago, the grass is already covered and, if the weatherman is correct, by morning we should see a depth of 3" to 6". The forecast high for May 12 is mid 30s. May temps usually range in the 60 to 70 degree range; this year they’ve rarely exceeded the high 50s. Corn planted April 19 lies dormant in a cold seedbed (soil temperature is lower than it was three weeks ago)...sugar beets are either burned off by last week’s high wind or killed by the hard freeze which followed; alfalfa is yellowed by cold and lack of sun; winter wheat looks miserable. Our first snow of 2009 fell in September and we’ve had measurable mounts of snow each and every month since. We’ve had a bellyful of winter and are fed up with the local version of "global warming."
  • 5/13 - Livingston/LaSalle Counties, Ill.: My 250 acres of wheat have dwindled to 10 acres. The insurance adjusters calculated my wheat might make the 17 to 32 bushel range. The 10 acres I have left is back in behind a hay field and is protected by a grove of trees, so it wasn't as brutalized by the winter! There is very little wheat around this area. And what is here is shorter than normal. I'm sure the cooler, wet weather we are having now has slowed the maturity. No heads have poked out yet. Even with the warmest April on record, the current cool spell has gotten us back in sync with the calendar. I would expect a normal timing for wheat harvest, generally over the 4th of July weekend, or during that week. I am still looking for wheat straw to get trucked in for my contracts!
  • 5/12 - Henry County, northwest Ohio: Rain and more rain. Since April 23 over 6" have fell. Today another inch with a temp of 43 degrees this afternoon. Progress on planting ranges from corn done to some that have not started. Most have corn to plant yet. Soybeans that were planted in April the frost got and some hail damage for others. Severe hail destroyed lots of wheat on May 5 and 7. Also did not help corn either. What started out looking like a good year has went the other way pretty fast.
  • 5/12 - Texas: With high winds and little or no rain, topsoils were drying out quickly throughout the state and stressing forages and other crops, according to Texas AgriLife Extension Service personnel. In most areas, the situation was reported as being troubling but not yet critical. Wheat was heading out, and thanks to earlier wet weather promised good yields in most areas.

    Winds bend pine trees and scatter sprinkler spray at a Texas AgriLife Extension Service irrigation test site near Overton. Strong winds and lack of rain are drying out pastures in East Texas, according to AgriLife Extension agents. (Texas AgriLife Extension Service photo by Robert Burns)
     

    (Have any photos of the crops on your farm? Send them to AgWeb and have them posted on Crop Comments! Be sure to include a caption.)



     
  • 5/12 - Dickey County, N.D.: Frost was prevalent here both Saturday and Sunday morning. We had an extended period of temps below 32 F. By 11 p.m. on Saturday night the thermometer outside read 31 F. There was not a lot of corn up but what was, is now black. If it doesn't "tie up" it'll regrow, but history tells us there will be some stand loss. Friends at Bottineau, N.D., had temps below freezing three nights in a row with a low of 19 F on Saturday; they are very concerned about all their crops, even the wheat. Soybean planting will begin in earnest once we dry out. Nine of the first 11 days in May have seen rain showers. Hopefully, warm dry weather is on the way.
  • 5/6 - Western Walsh County, northeast North Dakota: One week ago today we had 0.6 inch rain--just perfect. But it didn't stop, and we now have 2 inches and have not turned a wheel since. Temps are in the 30s to 50, cloudy, windy, and damp...not much for drying weather. We have 2,000 acres of wheat and canola left to seed before starting on the edible beans and sunflowers. On the positive side, we have never had as much seeded in April before.

     
  • 5/6 - Melvin, McCulloch County, Texas: Wind blowing and 99 degrees is taking a toll on the crop. Wheat has started turning and we should be in harvest possibly 24th of May. Crop looks above average with rust issues still a big concern on quality of wheat.

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  • 5/4 - Sherman, Texas: Chad Wetzel: Wheat crop is progressing along nicely.  We just finished up a foliar fungicide application last week for rust control. Soil moisture has been more than adequate this year and so far the earlier planted wheat is looking strong, while the later planted wheat has a slightly thinner stand but should be an average crop. Visit www.VoicesAcrossthePlains.com to follow videos and posts from these and other Voices Across the Plains growers as the season progresses.

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  • 5/4 - Martinsville, Ohio: Most of the soft red winter wheat in Ohio is past Feekes Stage 10.8. It is time to scout wheat for disease and pull tissue tests to see nutrient relationships, if you haven't already. The wheat I have checked shows good nutrient balance, even though it has been cool and wet where some nutrients don't flow as well.  Paying attention to sulfur, NPK and micronutrients has given us a good-looking, healthy crop. Potential for disease is there. I have not seen any leaf diseases or barley yellow dwarf virus showing up yet. After heavy rains, our corn is germinating or is up. Earlier April fields are in the four-leaf stage and a week later is two-leaf stage. The beans behind my house planted April 24 are emerging and we have several fields planted before then. Crusting is not a problem after the rains, but could be later on. With the predicted rainfall in the near future, I don't expect any problems. Weed control is working and I have not seen any insect problems to speak of.
     
  • 5/3 - McPherson, Kan: Spring arrived and I have been busy getting corn, soybean and milo acres ready. The wheat head is in the boot and we are 6-7 weeks away from harvest. It usually starts within a couple days of June 20 here.  We only had 1.53" rain in April and 1.46" in March, but then we had excellent subsoil coming into it.  There has been strip rust, etc., found in the wheat. A number of people are spreading fungicide. Of course, at $4 wheat and $20/acre treatment, it is not an easy decision.
     

 


  
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