Apr 17, 2014
Home| Tools| Events| Blogs| Discussions Sign UpLogin


June 2009 Archive for U.S. Farm Report Mailbag

RSS By: U.S. Farm Report, US Farm Report

Comments, questions, opinions...this is your chance to speak out regarding anything and everything reported on U.S. Farm Report. Viewer feedback updated regularly.

Ag & the Endangered Species Law

Jun 24, 2009
To Whom it May Concern,
 
I just want to strongly encourage your organization to cover the current politically created drought in the Southern San Joaquin Valley of California.  We have gotten the attention of Sean Hannity & many other important politically motivated reporters but I have yet to see any reporting from your show.  This isn't a local problem, we all need to get together to change the Endangered Species law or every farming community in this country will soon be run by the environmental groups.  They have more money and more time to focus on their end goals than any of us can ever imagine.  We don't know how to fight this battle alone nor do we have any money left to get the kind of media campaign going that is needed to set precedence in this fight.  All I ask is you get your resources involved and reach out to the the USA.  It's time we took back what is ours and all get together as a unified Agricultural community and stop the growing senseless regulations. 
 
Best,
 
A concerned fellow Farmer

A Great Question

Jun 19, 2009

John,
   A dumb question I know from a city boy...are the eggs fertilized by roosters to produce baby chicks before they are formed and layed by the hen, or after?  What process makes the eggs we eat non fertile?
David Poll

Editor's Note:  John's response is below and will be featured in the June 20-21 edition of the Farm Report Mailbag...

   FIRST OF ALL DAVID, IT'S NOT A DUMB QUESTION.  I WASN'T SURE MYSELF.  ONCE YOU ANNOUNCE YOU ARE A FARMER, PEOPLE EXPECT INTIMATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE ENTIRE FIELD OF KNOWLEDGE IN AGRICULTURE. WORSE YET, I'M AN ENGINEER, NOT AN ANIMAL SCIENCE MAJOR.   WE HAVEN'T HAD CHICKENS SINCE I WAS SMALL BOY.  IN FACT, OUR UNUSED CHICKEN HOUSE BECAME THE HEADQUARTERS FOR MY MODEL ROCKET CLUB.   
   ANYWAY, EGGS ARE FERTILIZED BY THE ROOSTER AND HEN MATING BEFORE THE EGGS BEGIN TO FORM A SHELL OR YOLK.  ONE MATING CAN SUFFICE FOR SEVERAL DAYS OF LAYING FERTILE EGGS.  HOWEVER, SINCE HENS WILL LAY EGGS WITHOUT MATING, COMMERICAL EGGS ARE MOSTLY NON-FERTILE, WITH NO ROOSTERS INVOLVED.
   REGARDLESS, EVEN FERTILIZED EGGS WILL NOT BEGIN TO DEVELOP EMBRYOS UNLESS TEMPERATURES ARE WARM ENOUGH, WHICH IS WHY HENS SIT ON EGGS AND WE USE INCUBATORS IN HATCHERIES.  BY KEEPING EGGS COOL, FERTILIZED EGGS ARE ESSENTIALLY INDENTICAL NUTRITIONALLY AND PHYSICALLY TO NON-FERTILIZED.  THANKS FOR THE E-MAIL. IF YOU HAVE A QUESTION ABOUT AGRICULTURE - NO MATTER HOW BASIC - WE'D BE GLAD TO HELP.

 

Corn Demand Question

Jun 15, 2009

   I always enjoy your shows on the weekends with the comments from the many different people in the grain marketing world. Today's (June 13-14, 2009) emphasis was on the possibility of dwindling corn demand because the livestock people were in such difficult times. My question: is it the current price that is between $4.00 and $5.00 that is the problem or is it the $7.00 corn that they locked last year that is killing them?  If it is the $7.00 corn, how are lower prices now going to help them? I, strictly a cash grain farmer, have had to chew through similar issues because I made the same mistake when I borrowed the money and paid for ammonia and DAP at over $1100.00 per ton. It appears to me that some of these large livestock producers have similar management problems as some of the other big conglomerates in our country. We don't seem to have any reserve, because every thing is actually run on some one else's money, i.e. the friendly banker.  I know that we need the feed use to use the corn supply, but let us get it correct which pricing situation is the culprit.
Jerry Williams
Carmi, Illinois

 

The Immigration Debate

Jun 08, 2009
Editor's Note:  John's commentary on the immigration debate drew strong response from viewers.  Below are their comments, followed by John's commentary in its entirety:

Letter #1:
John,
  Your Commentary on illegal Immigrants hits pretty close to home. Here in NC we see them all over the place displacing lots of American workers I haven't lost a job to them myself, I'm self employed, but I know of some folks that have been pushed out of work by these illegal workers. 
  
Yes they are just trying to improve their lot in life but, you folks that hire them just because they will work for less and live 37 people in a 2 bedroom house need to wake up and realize that you may be hurting us all. 
  These folks are Illegal that means they aren't paying any taxes they don't have insurance to pay for doctor visits they are sending their Illegal children to schools they aren't paying taxes to support, lot's of them are standing in the welfare lines gathering up more tax dollars paid in buy fewer and fewer working Americans. They are also a large part of the jailhouse population, more tax dollars at work.
   I could go on but by now I think you get the point. 
I'm sure you will keep working them as will the farmers, contractors, restaurants, furniture plants etc. around here. But I don't think you should make it sound OK on your farming show.
   Think about this. These folks are breaking the law every day of the week just by being here illegally. What if everyone was allowed to break the law everyday and get by with it? Maybe some will chose to drive 100 MPH everywhere they go some will chose to drive drunk, maybe some will decide they want to steal whatever they want. Is there a difference? All are laws, all are being broken. I believe hiring an illegal is illegal itself is it not?
  
  
I'm not a farmer though I was raised with them all around me I worked in tobacco as a kid. My wife and I do try to raise a small garden each year along with some apples and blueberries. I don't own a tractor but I do work on some on occasion.  I like your show especially the old tractor segment  and will keep watching even though you condone law breaking. Mayhap you will change your views but it's not likely.  Just some early morning ramblings from an old Southern boy.
Mike Wilson

Letter #2:
   The issue of immigration has about run its course. Considering the condition of the U.S. economy and Global Warming is creating drought or flood conditions for farmers, there won't be many farms soon to operate, anyway. Those farms that can sustain all these negative conditions, will not be able to keep up with the coming demand for food.
   As the economy falls, consider the impact on farm machinery. If John Deere and others like them fall, as the Auto Industry is, what are farmers supposed to do? Go back to working the land by hand? (Probably)
   Tomatos are already $4.00 a pound in parts of Arizona.  It's getting a bit too late to care about Mexican Citizens coming to America Illegally, without getting in line and doing it LEGALLY, as folks from other nations do. Illegals have added debt to the National Debt, while individuals have profited from the practice ... it doesn't matter any more. - We'll all be working the land soon, or we'll die off.
   Watch in the coming years what happens in cities where food can't be grown. Chances are, city folks will come to the rural farm areas ... and they'll be hungry.
Good Luck,
Bob

JOHN'S WORLD COMMENTARY:
      I HAVE A FRIEND WHO IS AN AVID HOCKEY FAN. WHILE I DON'T GET THE GAME, I CAN APPRECIATE HER INTEREST AND ENJOY HER EXCITED COMMENTS ABOUT THE PLAYOFFS.
     RECENTLY SHE JOKED THIS YEAR'S STANLEY CUP PLAYOFF BETWEEN THE DETROIT RED-WINGS AND THE PITTSBURGH PENGUINS ACTUALLY RESEMBLES A GAME BETWEEN SWEDEN AND RUSSIA, RESPECTIVELY.
     IN THIS ASPECT, PRO SPORTS INCREASINGLY RESEMBLES SOME PARTS OF AGRICULTURE, THAT IS, HIGHLY DEPENDENT ON FOREIGN WORKERS. 
     AFTER MUCH SPECULATION, THE NATIONAL MILK PRODUCERS FEDERATION RECENTLY RELEASED SURVEY RESULTS THAT SHOWED OVER FORTY PERCENT OF DAIRY WORKERS WERE FOREIGN BORN - VIRTUALLY ALL FROM MEXICO.
     I HAVE ALSO TALKED TO A TOBACCO GROWER FROM KENTUCKY WHO THINKS OF HIS HISPANIC WORKERS AS FAMILY, AND CONSIDERS THEM HIS MOST VALUABLE BUSINESS ASSET. EXPERIENCES LIKE THESE COMPLICATE THE ISSUE OF IMMIGRATION THAT SEEMS SO CLEARCUT TO MANY OBSERVERS.
     JAN AND I HAVE FOREIGN-BORN DOCTORS, OUR CHILDREN WERE TAUGHT BY IMMIGRANT PROFESSORS, AND I HAVE A GOOD FRIEND WHOSE DAUGHTER ANXIOUSLY AWAITS OFFICIAL STATUS IN ENGLAND SO SHE CAN CONTINUE TO WORK AND LIVE THERE.
     TREATING IMMIGRATION AS US VERSUS THEM NEGATES THIS IMPORTANT ECONOMIC ADVANTAGE - LABOR MOBILITY. ALLOWING PEOPLE TO DO WHAT THEY DO BEST WHEREVER THEY CAN IS GOOD FOR OUR ECONOMY AND IMPROVES OUR RELATIONS WITH OTHER NATIONS.

Lots of Letters

Jun 08, 2009
*Editor's Note: The June 6-7, 2009 edition of U.S. Farm Report drew some interesting viewer response...covering everything from ethanol to immigration to the correct pronunciation of tortilla...

#1:
 
   Now Wisconsin dairymen know how smokers feel after the recent tobacco tax increases of 156% to 2,000%. Their "fees" are going up 480%, just about the average for all tobacco products.  Both types of costs are highly regressive, impacting below median income households relatively much more than those with higher income.  So much for promises not to raise taxes/fees on the less well off.
Phil Parker

#2:
   What befenfits does the average consumer see from the use of ethanol in fuel? I do know that snowmobile engines, boat motors, etc are having very determental effects because of ethanol not to mention the older farm equipment. I have relatives that use older farm equipment for their hay that now have to add expensive fuel stabilizers to the fuel because the corrosion to the metal fuel tanks and older fuel system components that deteriate much faster because of ethanol. One owns and uses a 1959 farmall tractor and a 1952 international flatbed truck to harvest approx. 2500 bales of hay for his small beef cattle operation (approx 25 head) that does not see any benefit but looks at more money out of his pocket for fuel stabilzers to counteract the effects of ethanol. The other major problem with ethanol based fuel that I've personally seen is the reduced fuel milage with a decrease of approx 2 mpg for both my trucks(94 chevy s10 and a 1995 gmc 4x4) not to mention my older lawn and garden tractors and mowers that i have to add expensive fuel additives to run them so where are the benefits to the average consumer for ethanol based fuels. I personally don't see any benefits for ethanol based fuels because any benefits that are gained enviromentally for using ethanol based fuels are being negated by having to consume more of these products to do the same work as the older fuels not to mention the increased price of these fuels.  Please let me know if there are any other ways to make the ethanol based fuels more user friendly without costing us more to use them. 
Bob Roy  (average consumer)


#3:
John,
  Your Commentary on illegal Immigrants hits pretty close to home. Here in NC we see them all over the place displacing lots of American workers I haven't lost a job to them myself, I'm self employed, but I know of some folks that have been pushed out of work by these illegal workers. 
   Yes they are just trying to improve their lot in life but, you folks that hire them just because they will work for less and live 37 people in a 2 bedroom house need to wake up and realize that you may be hurting us all. 
  These folks are Illegal that means they aren't paying any taxes they don't have insurance to pay for doctor visits they are sending their Illegal children to schools they aren't paying taxes to support, lot's of them are standing in the welfare lines gathering up more tax dollars paid in buy fewer and fewer working Americans. They are also a large part of the jailhouse population, more tax dollars at work.
   I could go on but by now I think you get the point.  I'm sure you will keep working them as will the farmers, contractors, restaurants, furniture plants etc. around here. But I don't think you should make it sound OK on your farming show.
   Think about this. These folks are breaking the law every day of the week just by being here illegally. What if everyone was allowed to break the law everyday and get by with it? Maybe some will chose to drive 100 MPH everywhere they go some will chose to drive drunk, maybe some will decide they want to steal whatever they want. Is there a difference? All are laws, all are being broken. I believe hiring an illegal is illegal itself is it not?  
  
I'm not a farmer though I was raised with them all around me I worked in tobacco as a kid. My wife and I do try to raise a small garden each year along with some apples and blueberries. I don't own a tractor but I do work on some on occasion.  I like your show especially the old tractor segment  and will keep watching even though you condone law breaking. Mayhap you will change your views but it's not likely.  Just some early morning ramblings from an old Southern boy.
Mike Wilson

#4:
   The issue of immigration has about run its course. Considering the condition of the U.S. economy and Global Warming is creating drought or flood conditions for farmers, there wont be many farms soon to operate, anyway. Those farms that can sustain all these negative conditions, will not be able to keep up with the coming demand for food.
   As the economy falls, consider the impact on farm machinery. If John Deere and others like them fall, as the Auto Industry is, what are farmers supposed to do? Go back to working the land by hand? (Probably)
   Tomatos are already $4.00 a pound in parts of Arizona.  It's getting a bit too late to care about Mexican Citizens coming to America Illegally, without getting in line and doing it LEGALLY, as folks from other nations do. Illegals have added debt to the National Debt, while individuals have profited from the practice ... it don't matter any more. - We'll all be working the land soon, or we'll die off.
   Watch in the coming years what happens in cities where food can't be grown. Chances are, city folks will come to the rural farm areas ... and they'll be hungry.
Good Luck,
Bob


#5
Hi there Yankee College Boy,
    I'm a California State University Girl.  Out here we have to speak some Spanish or die.  I know you're an educated man and won't take offense to this note. (I actually send these to many news people; all before this were about English mispronunciations.  Don't feel bad about not having a Spanish-English dictionary...)
   Tortilla is pronounced tore-tea-yah, with the emphasis on tea.  I hope this helps.
Your new friend,
Kitty
 
P. S.  Can you ask your buddy there on the report, why is our government so stupid?  Cows are not a man-made source of greenhouse gases...why penalize the dairy farmer????  My interest, I love my cheese, cream, milk and butter...no oleo for me! 
We have more cow on earth only because we have more people, do we need to overtax the producers of too many babies????  Octamom, here comes the taxman!!!!!!!  If someone can help me put some sense into the government, I'd appreciate it.  All my letters are put into the round file.  
 

#6:
 

John, 
  Move over corn based ethanol. Imagine replacing 30,000 acres of corn in an already corn defecit area. Time will tell. Let the free market alone to work this one out.
   Energy beets: a $93M 'wonder fuel'?
   The story is located at
http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/11/84228

 

 

Wonders of Watermelon

Jun 02, 2009
John,
   The research boys in Oklahoma are only reinventing the wheel so far as watermelon ethanol technology is concerned. Us red-necked people have honed that system to perfection over the years. We simply fill a pocket with watermelon seeds that we have saved from a prior year and as we plant our cotton and corn we simply drop a few watermelon seeds into the drill from time to time. The plants grow without further attention.  As the fruits ripen both the two and four legged animals harvest what they desire.
   The merits of watermelon wine are celebrated in southern folk music. In fact we have been making watermelon wine (ethanol, for you college people) longer than your farm has been producing corn. A right tasty drink can be made with baker's yeast.  All the equipment needed can be borrowed from the kitchen. We can even make two hundred gallons for personal consumption without violating the laws.  Personally I prefer my corn ground and made into crispy cornbread sticks or toasted tortillos. It is more efficient (less labor intensive, for you college boys) and more pleasing to our uncultured taste buds. Just try to imagine what you could accomplish with a few thousand pounds of watermelon seeds using this "NEW" technology on your corn acres?
George Grogan  
Longview, TX
Log In or Sign Up to comment

COMMENTS

 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions