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August 2011 Archive for U.S. Farm Report Mailbag

RSS By: U.S. Farm Report, US Farm Report

Comments, questions, opinions...this is your chance to speak out regarding anything and everything reported on U.S. Farm Report. Viewer feedback updated regularly.

Ban an Analyst, Kids & Rodeo

Aug 16, 2011

***Editor's Note:  The following comments were received in response to the August 14-15, 2011, edition of "U.S. Farm Report"

#1:  I really think Mike Florez should be "BANNED" from "U.S. Farm Report." $9.75-$13 corn???? What is this guy smoking? (or advertising, ha ha). At least Bill Beidermann has some common sense. Sorry to have missed you at RML Trading in Grand Forks, hoping to meet you this winter with BETTER weather.  Marty Hattervig - Buxton, N.D.

#2: Just dropping a line to let you know I enjoyed your commentary (John's World) on the Aug. 14 "U.S. Farm Report" show. America definitely needs to find a middle ground and quit living extreme lifestyles in order to be successful. Many have come to know a life of instant gratfication and self-importance and it has led to a very greedy and disappointing path many have taken. I hope for our kids we can get back to a more simple way of life again. I enjoy your show very much, very informative and insightful. I just wish it aired at a more convenient time, airs at 4 a.m. in Kansas City on KMBC-TV ABC. Maybe I will start recording it more. Thanks again and keep up the good work.  Aaron Luke

#3: Your report on rodeo on Aug 13th...in my opinion, kids should not be allowed to do anything related to rodeo because it is too dangerous, as we all know; if they want to do it, then they will have to wait till they are 18. Now, you wonder why I say this -- it is probably most likely that I am a "city girl mother" who lives in the country. Maybe there is someone out there who can convince me otherwise. Wendi Bryan 

#4:  Hello John,I always enjoy the show. There is a saying that has been around for many years: "The road to riches is paved with inheritance." And this saying is probably more true than not when it comes to farming. It is not just having enough money to start farming, there is a tremendous learning curve when it comes to switching occupations. I was a crop duster (ag pilot) for 35 years (I started at 25 years old). Had a very good safety record for those 35 years. Sold our spraying business and retired into a small farming operation.

I started farming at 60 years old, just farming 160 acres of dryland wheat and 135 acres of double-crop irrigated wheat and soybeans. It really surprised me what I didn't know about farming, even though I had been spraying crops for 35 years. When a person changes from one occupation to another, he had better hit the books all over again. If a person is not willing to learn and take advice from more experienced farmers, he is just looking for trouble.

The learning curve in farming is just about as hard as a 55-year-old, 1,000-hour private pilot becoming an ag pilot -- it can become expensive -- both physically and financially. It is not impossible, but it is not really recommended.   Carlin Lawrence

#5:  Here in our area it's dry. July we only had 1.35 inches of rain -- most of July was triple-digit temperatures too...location southeast of Kansas City, Mo. First of July, cornstalks had three ear shoots per stalk. New technology corn first week in July would have made over 200 bushels...now the first week in August I doubt if it will make 100 bushels. Last Friday we had a mean thunderstorm -- high winds, power off for five hours. Some corn fields are flat -- others are spotty. Our farm renter ordered a reel to pick up downed corn. He said the lady asked what was going on -- "You're the 70th ordered." Soybeans still could make a crop...got 0.86 of rain yesterday.  Herb Fender                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

 

John's Take On Farm Subsidies

Aug 08, 2011

***Below is a transcript of John's comments on farm subsidies that aired this past weekend, followed by viewer reaction...

JOHN'S WORLD:

IT IS INTERESTING THAT LEGISLATORS AND LOBBYISTS ARE HAVING A HARDER TIME GETTING ATTENTION FOR NEW FARM BILL DISCUSSIONS. WHILE THE DAIRY INDUSTRY IS WORKING FOR A MAJOR REVAMP, NOT MUCH TOO INTEREST IS BREWING ELSEWHERE.

 

SOME OF THIS IS FATALISM. WE HAVE BEEN TOLD MORE THAN ONCE, FOR EXAMPLE, THAT THE ETHANOL BLENDER CREDIT AND TARIFF ARE DOOMED, AND EVEN DIRECT PAYMENTS. AFTER SO MANY TIMES, I THINK WE HAVE STARTED TO BUY INTO THEIR DEMISE. AND TO BE FAIR, MORE FARMERS THAN USUAL ARE GRUDGINGLY ADMITTING THAT CUTTING THE DEFICIT WILL AFFECT US.

 

BUT THE MAIN REASON I THINK IS MORE PROSAIC - IT JUST DOESN'T MATTER AS MUCH AS IT USED TO. MY DIRECT PAYMENT - WHICH AMOUNTS TO ABOUT 23 DOLLARS PER ACRE THIS YEAR EQUATES TO ABOUT 3 BUSHELS OF CORN AT CURRENT PRICES. THE SAME COMPARISON FOR SOY, COTTON AND WHEAT APPLIES.

 

FARMERS HAVE ALWAYS CLAIMED WE WOULD RATHER GET OUR MONEY FROM THE MARKET THAN THE GOVERNMENT. IF THIS IS NOT EXACTLY THE CASE, I DON'T KNOW WHAT WOULD QUALIFY.

 

WHY NOT DECLARE VICTORY AND SET AN EXAMPLE THAT WILL SHOCK AND AWE WASHINGTON AND PERHAPS EVEN OURSELVES? OUR INDUSTRY COULD REDEEM A TARNISHED IMAGE AND REINFORCE OUR SELF-RESPECT BY SIMPLY ECHOING COMEDIAN HENNY YOUNGMAN: TAKE MY SUBSIDY. PLEASE.

VIEWER FEEDBACK:

#1: Just heard your comment on giving up farm subsidies.  It might be alright if prices stay at levels they are now but what happens if we  get back to $3.00 wheat.  I had protein discounts this winter that were higher than I used to get for my wheat not too many years ago.  Also wonder how they are going to keep farmers from draining and doing whatever they want if they aren't always threatening to take your  farm payments away. Just some food for thought.   Richard Lynne

 
#2:  Thanks for the editorial on us farm subsidies. I have called my legislators for the last 2 years and have told (begged) them farmers don't need this subsidy money at our current prices and if farmers can't make it in today's pricing of commodities they should think about

another career.   I for one have not taken a USDA payment for 15 years or more, it was more of a hassle than a rescue for our farm.  Since not taking the payments I sleep better knowing I don't have to tell the government my business, lord knows they stick their nose into it enough as it is and I can plant what ever I feel like with out getting a scolding letter saying I planted the wrong crop!!!  Keep up the great show - Steve, Tecumseh, MI 
 

#3: Yes, please take our subsidy - please, with less regulations. Thank you!  Bill and Cathy Muetze

 

 

 

Good Times for Ag & Machinery Licensing

Aug 02, 2011

***The viewer comments below were received following the July 30-31, 2011 edition of U.S. Farm Report...

#1:  I really enjoy US Farm Report even though I am not a farmer. I was disappointed in your recent editorial about the Marcellus Shale. Not only did you not include West Virginia in the list of states but you dredged up the tired "fracking will ruin our water" argument. The EPA has never confirmed a case where fracking fluids or fracking itself has contaminated a water well. Fracking is usually done at the bottom of the well. In Marcellus Shale that is usually between 5000 and 6000 feet down. Most water is found at less than 500. In addition, the well casing is cemented in so the fracking fluid can't migrate into the water table. Are there accidents, yes but the industry is making every effort to be responsible with their drilling and fracking and respect the environment. Comments like yours only add to the hysteria and scare people unnecessarily. If your viewers want to be sure drilling isn't affecting their water well then they should test it BEFORE drilling starts.
Dick Bonnet 
Parkersburg, WV

 

#2:  How great it is for Ag ! Record prices for grain and the sky seems to be the limit. It's all good news!  I work for Deere and Company in Waterloo, Iowa. Man, are we selling tractors!! Man, are the profits great!  I remember the 80's well when Deere in Waterloo went from 14,000 worker down to 3,000....from 200+ tractors a day down to 30. What a disaster for ag!  Currently,while the rest of the US economy stagnates, ag does well. Can this go on indefinitely? Of course not.
   Some differences between now and the 80's; In 1980 the federal deficit was 1 trillion$...now it's 14 trillion. In 1980, China was a backwater joke...now they are the #2 economy in the world, hold 1 1/4 trillion of US debt, take 1/2 our soybean crop, and pay for it all via a monster trade imbalance with the US. The US manufacturing base has been reduced by half since 1980. Ag needs to enjoy the current good times because uncertain times most assuredly will follow. Can the US do another 30 years like the last 30? Now that is laughable.  Uncle Bob

#3:  I watched your report on new regulations in reference to Tractor Trailers and new regulations on transporting goods over the road. My question is what happened to being "Grandfathered In"? Possibly it depends on who your Grandfather is! A politician or a farmer.  Please keep up the good work and reporting.
 

Thomas - Dusty Pines Ranch
Kent City, MI
 
#4:  John, I judge our ages to be about the same but from what I read in your BIO your farm is just about three times the size of our farming operation. I don’t expect our enterprise to increase before retirement because of competition but we are content with our accomplishments and capable of living into retirement modestly. But I must and will take issue ( and I suspect I will not be the only one to do so ) with your opinion regarding the licensing of all Farm Machinery just to afford the government more revenue to squander rather than to curb their appetite for Spending for senseless causes such as War and many other non-productive ventures. To render assistance WHEN ASKED FOR to a limited degree is one thing but to think that this United States government is in any position to hold itself up for the rest of the world to emulate and then squander countless lives and immeasurable tons of money to require that the rest of the world be like US is totally preposterous. And to TAX,TAX, Tax on infinitum can be carried right on out to eventually taxing the very next breath you take but I ask you: Will that be enough? I personally don’t think so. So why not just go back to plain logic and sound reasoning and basic fundamental principles that this Great Nation was founded upon to get this once great USA back on track or we can continue down the road we are currently traveling and watch this Country ( as evidenced by our Political so-called leaders ) sink into oblivion just like the once great Roman Empire.   Jim Hixson
 
 

 

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