Sep 30, 2014
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January 2012 Archive for U.S. Farm Report Mailbag

RSS By: U.S. Farm Report, US Farm Report

Comments, questions, opinions...this is your chance to speak out regarding anything and everything reported on U.S. Farm Report. Viewer feedback updated regularly.

The Global Warming Debate...Continued...

Jan 30, 2012

***Editor's Note:  The following is a viewer response to John's commentary on global warming this past weekend.  We have posted his comments immediately following the viewer feedback...

   I had some classes in physical geology when I was in college. To measure worldwide temperatures and climate trends is likely a reasonable way to understand worldwide changes. However, it's causation that is a much bigger question. Dinosaur bones are being dug in Alaska without enough good explanations of how the weather there could have been warm enough for those animals and the supporting vegetation. Other than worldwide climate cycles, ice age beginnings and ends are pretty hard to explain. If we think on a 'small' time scale, we can strictly blame industrialization for climate change. If we look at science and world scale history, there are other possibilities here. Or maybe humanity is simply arrogant enough to assume they have the intelligence and power to be responsible for every good and bad thing that happens on the planet. Regards, Tom Lingbloom - Minneapolis, Minnesota

*John's World Transcript:
   THERE WAS ANOTHER GOVERNMENT REPORT ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE RELEASED A FEW DAYS AGO. TOP CLIMATE SCIENTISTS OUTLINED IN CLEAR TERMS THE GRIM CONSEQUENCES ON THE HORIZON FOR PEOPLE AND AGRICULTURE. THE CHANGES IN CROP PRODUCTION WILL BE SIGNIFICANT. RICE PRODUCTION WILL LIKELY MOVE NORTH AND EAST TO COPE WITH DROUGHTS. CORN PRODUCTION WILL LIKEWISE SHIFT NORTHWARD AS SEASONS, ESPECIALLY WINTERS, GET WARMER. TOTAL CROP PRODUCTION FOR THE NATION COULD DECREASE EVEN WITH HIGHER YIELDS.
   MOST ALARMING ARE THE PREDICTIONS FOR MUNICIPAL WATER SUPPLIES. CITIES, MANY OVER A MILLION, WILL FACE SEVERE WATER SHORTAGES BY 2050. AT THE SAME TIME THE EAST COAST WILL STRUGGLE WITH HIGHER SEA LEVELS WHICH THREATEN MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS.. RAINFALL WILL BE INCREASINGLY CONCENTRATED IN THE SUMMER AND AUTUMN, WITH LONG DRY WINTERS AND MORE FREQUENT FLOODING DURING GROWING SEASONS.
   THE REPORTS AUTHOR LEFT NO DOUBT ABOUT GOVERNMENT NEED TO BEGIN PLANNING TO ADAPT TO THESE CHANGES. LUCKILY THOSE EFFORTS TO ADAPT WON'T HAVE TO BE DEBATED BY CONGRESS. THERE WON'T BE BE MANY CHARGES OF SCIENTIFIC CONSPIRACY OR ACADEMIC FRAUD. THE POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE WON'T BE THE DRIVING ISSUE. YOU SEE, THIS REPORT WAS ISSUED BY THE CHINESE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY FOR THEIR NATIONAL FUTURE. IT MAY BE THE U-S IS THE ONLY COUNTRY WHO SEES THROUGH THE ALLEGED CLIMATE CHANGE HOAX. OR THIS COULD BE ANOTHER AREA LIKE TEXTILES, CARS OR COMPUTERS WHERE WE WILL BE A FOLLOWER. 
 

Two Complaints & One Response

Jan 24, 2012

***The following comments were received in response to the January 21-21, 2012 edition of U.S. Farm Report...

#1: I never miss U.S. FARM REPORT.  Almost always see AGDAY.   Al Pell,  Mike Hoffman and John Phipps do a bang up job and I also like Tyne Morgan.  I do have a very minor complaint.  I heard once that you want to keep  round table market reports positive.  I am writing in regards to the program aired on Jan 21st  You had Mike North and Blue Reef guy on.  I find opposing  views much more interesting and informative than two guys that sit and agree with each other.  Let em fight!  The markets are what they are and it’s the negative that bites us.   Ag Day marketing report  could be longer.  I wouldn’t watch if you were skipping that function. I have great admiration for what you do there.  It looks like a huge HUGE  job to gather the information you display. 

ED Schmid - Minnewaukan, ND (spring wheat, winter wheat, soybeans, pinto beans, canola, and corn)

P.S. The drought in the southern US extended into the Pinto bean  production region of Mexico.  I have heard they are desperate down there robbing moving trains,  Hijacking farmers and even stealing plants at night.  Might be worth a look.
 
#2:  John, bad call about agriculture understating income. Today’s farmers who pay nearly all the farm income taxes use computers and tax accountants to compute tax liability. Not much room for fraud since computers don’t miscalculate and accountants and tax preparers can’t afford to lie.  Our books have to balance. You owe farmers an apology.
Wes Belter North Dakota
 
***John's Response: 
   Wes:  Those were not numbers I pulled out of my hat.  Here is the data. My other information comes from anecdotes from grain buyers. I use QuickBooks and know if I don't enter a truckload and cash the check, it will never know. Nor will an accountant.  I'm sure I'm not the only one who has figured that out. I've also had a few friends audited and who shared their experience. It may not be a problem focussed solely on farmers, but also share-rent landowners. The IRS report doesn't differentiate, and the number was totaled in with 4797 and other miscellaneous income sources.  
   Bottom line: farm income is a major source of underreported income. How or why is speculation and I offered my comments in that vein.
Thanks for watching and for your feedback.
John

 

Viewers Speak: Vet Shortage, Church Choirs & Classic Iron

Jan 09, 2012

Editor's Note: The following comments were received in response to the Jan. 7-8, 2012, edition of "U.S. Farm Report."

#1: I really love watching your show. I don't have a farm, or any acreage, no large animals, just a couple of older dogs and one lazy, rotten cat. I am concerned that the future looks bleak for large animal vets, at least in the area I live, Hamilton County, Tenn. A couple of large animal vets are still active in our area, but are getting up in years and I don't know what the farmers in this area will do when these guys are retired or deceased. I had taken a course a couple of years ago for vet assistant and had hoped to be able to work with a vet's office, but that obviously didn't happen, so I have taken another office job. I don't expect to walk in their door and know everything about all animals, but it would be nice if someone would be glad that I have an interest in learning, but they don't. Our county's Ag Office is not what I expected it to be and really has nothing going on, except master gardening and maybe the County Fair. Is the rest of the country the same way it is here...are we headed to the direction of importing all our food? If so, then this country is in bad shape! Sorry to rant about this, but that would be my dream job, something that I would want to do and go to each day, not because I had to go, but because I want to go. I think people are just lazy now, but they will be sorry one day...just hope they don't realize it too late! Keep up the good work. I really love your show!!!

Ann Heck - Harrison, TN

#2: I just saw your quick piece on Choir Appreciation Week. As I get ready to go to choir practice before Sunday service, I would like to share how choir has influenced my life. I don’t read music but am able to sing a little and absolutely love it. The choir I am a part of allows me to join them and I cannot tell you how much it has enriched my life and my religion. It adds to the Sunday service and Easter and Christmas are very special times for all in our group. The fact that they put up with someone who doesn’t read music yet loves to sing is a testament to the group at Trinity Lutheran Church, Carthage, IL. I am on my way to thank them now. Thanks again for your short piece on the joys of singing.

Tom Holtsclaw

#3:  Dear Friends, Just a note to let you know how much we here on Del-Mar-Va enjoy your program, especially your segments on tractors and country churches, of which we have many. Not knowing whether you're able to share the below (YouTube) Internets video about us, but let us know if we can help, the below link will take you to scenes of one of our region's best kept secrets -- our Eastern Shore Threshermen's Steam & Gas Show that has been held annually for the past 51 years and is held during the first weekend in August.

Sincerely, Frank Bittner  

 
 
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