Apr 16, 2014
Home| Tools| Events| Blogs| Discussions| Sign UpLogin

Advice for Choosing Faster-Maturing Corn Hybrids

May 26, 2011
Corn Planting Indiana
Indiana and Ohio corn farmers have struggled to plant their crops because of exceptionally wet spring weather.  

As corn growers continue to battle uncooperative spring planting weather, a Purdue Extension agronomist says they may need to consider faster-maturing corn hybrids.

As of this week, 79% of the U.S. corn crop is in the ground, according to the May 23 Crop Progress and Condition Ratings. While forecasters predict improving weather, corn planting has already been delayed enough that plant maturity could become an issue.
 
"One of the biggest agronomic concerns with severely delayed planting is the risk of the crop not reaching physiological maturity before a killing fall freeze and the yield losses that could result," he said. "An economic concern with delayed planting is the risk of high grain moistures at harvest and the resulting costs incurred by drying the grain or price discounts by buyers."
 
In "Safe Hybrid Maturities for Delayed Corn Planting in Indiana,” Nielsen offers tables that list relative hybrid maturities for corn planted through June 10, based on heat unit requirements and anticipated "normal" accumulation of heat units between planting and an average date of a killing fall freeze.
 
But while faster-maturing hybrids should reach maturity by their projected dates, severely delayed plantings still are likely to mature later in the fall when further in-field grain drying is at a slower pace.
 
"Grain moisture at harvest for delayed plantings may be unacceptably high in terms of both the ease of harvest and the cost of artificially drying the grain," Nielsen said.
 
He also noted that farmers can somewhat mitigate that frustration by planting even earlier-maturing hybrids, but even then there may not be a great difference in grain moisture.
 
"Typically, a one-day difference in relative maturity rating equals 0.5 percent difference in grain moisture content at harvest," Nielsen said. "That means there will only be about two points difference between a 106-day hybrid and a 110-day hybrid, for example, at harvest."
 
Another factor corn growers should consider is the economic gain from corn to soybeans as planting is further delayed.
 
"The economic estimates are difficult because of the many varied agronomic and economic assumptions that influence the calculation, such as the expected yield from delayed planting," Nielsen said.
 
More information about delayed planting is available on Nielsen's "Chat 'n Chew Café" website.
 
For More Information
 
 
How is the weather affecting your planting season? Share your comments and read others in AgWeb’s Crop Comments.
  

 
 

See Comments

RELATED TOPICS: Corn, Weather, Crops

 
Log In or Sign Up to comment

COMMENTS

No comments have been posted



Name:

Comments:

Hot Links & Cool Tools

    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  

facebook twitter youtube View More>>
 
 
 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions