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Quicke Loaders Extend Reach with Rhino Alliance

February 15, 2013
By: Nate Birt, Top Producer Deputy Managing Editor
Quicke Loader Rhino
This attachment, a Quicke loader, is now available to Rhino-brand dealerships across the U.S.  

Quicke tractor loaders are now available from U.S. dealerships carrying the Rhino line, extending the reach of a popular farm attachment.

The relationship represents a natural fit, says Greg Pollock, director of sales and marketing for Rhino’s Ag Division. It is strictly a sales and marketing agreement with a goal of selling Quicke loaders to any dealership in the nation.

During the National Farm Machinery Show this week, the loaders were on display alongside Rhino rotary cutters and Earthmaster tillage equipment, among other products.

The dealership footprint for Alamo Group – which includes the Rhino and Bush Hog Brands – is growing as is the footprint for Alo, which manufactures Quicke loaders, Pollock says. Collectively, about two or three new dealers have come online weekly for some time. Quicke loaders have been sold by Rhino dealers since June. Terms and stocking programs have been added as part of the arrangement.

For years, Rhino built its own loaders. The company wants to move into new technology, a strategy that dovetails well with the Quicke partnership.

Other new products on display this week included the F415 Phantom, used for mowing pasture and along roadsides. It can cut material up to 1" in diameter, costs a little over $10,000 and went on the market about six to nine months ago, Pollock says.

It can be operated with a tractor using up to 90 hp and features an innovative design that allows the machine to get up over rocks and other obstacles without trapping dirt. Its design also reduces the amount of horsepower needed.

In the future, Pollock expects cutters and mowers will continue to evolve to become more structurally sound, lighter and nimbler. While a welded axle traditionally has been used, independent axles will be more widely used in the future. Decks will increasingly be designed without pockets to prevent grass from getting trapped during cleaning.  

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See Farm Journal Media's full coverage of the 2013 National Farm Machinery Show.

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