Jul 31, 2014
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The Ted Spread

RSS By: Ted Seifried, AgWeb.com

Ted is the Chief Market Strategist and Vice President in charge of the Zaner Ag Hedge Group and specializes in agricultural hedging employing various strategies using futures, futures spreads, outright options and option combinations. He believes it is paramount to be able to use different strategies to adapt to market conditions. Ted works with large to mid size grain and livestock producers and end users in North, Central and South America.

Is Corn Setting Up for a Harvest Rally?

Jul 31, 2014

TRADING COMMODITY FUTURES AND OPTIONS INVOLVES SUBSTANTIAL RISK OF LOSS AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR ALL INVESTORS. YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY CONSIDER WHETHER TRADING IS SUITABLE FOR YOU IN LIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES, KNOWLEDGE AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES.       

Corn has been under significant pressure in the last three months as near ideal weather has fueled thoughts of a record yield and possibly a record crop.  Since May, corn has fallen over $1.50 from highs.  However, with many analysts now throwing around super sized yield estimates is there a chance we are overshooting the mark?  

To date, this growing season has been near ideal for corn.  Aside for some isolated flooded out acres and hail damage corn has enjoyed near green house type weather.  We have seen rain when we have needed rain and there has been a good mix of mild and warm temps.  Currently the corn crop is rated by the USDA at 75% good to excellent which makes this one of the best rated crops on record at this time of year (tied for 4th best ratings since 1990).  While there is still time to have a weather issue or frost damage it is safe to say we are looking at a pretty good if not great corn crop.  

At this point there is little question that this corn crop will be big, but the question is really how big.  With the lowest planted acreage in 4 years the corn crop really needed to be above average this year to keep the balance sheet from getting tighter.  There is also likely some acres that will not get harvested either because they never really got planted due to wet conditions or because they got flooded out or hailed out.  So we really needed a record corn yield this year.  It looks like we will get it, but by how much?  

Sign up for our Morning Ag Hedge newsletter!  Sign up here: http://www.zaner.com/offers/?page=17      

The USDA was looking for a record yield for this corn crop from the get go.  Their trendline yield of 165.3 would be a new record by .6 bushels an acre.  Now, some analysts are talking about a national average corn yield over 170 bushels an acre with some as high as 174-176.  I can tell you from doing the math that it might be very difficult this year to come up with a national average yield over 170 bushels an acre.  While we do agree that the USDA's 165.3 seems a little low, it is difficult to justify an additional 10 bushels an acre.  Every state by state model we run puts us in a range of 167.8 to 170.3 with the higher end requiring an almost perfect finish to the growing season.  The difference in production between a 170 or a 174 national average yield equates to about 360 million bushels which is not exactly small change.  

So, with the market currently factoring in somewhere between a 172 and 176 bushel and acre national corn yield could it be the case that we are setting up for disappointment when we get out into field to harvest?  Many times things can seem better than they are and this year may be one of those times.  When combines roll we very well may find that this corn crop is excellent and a new record national average yield.  But, it may not be quite as big as some of the numbers being thrown around the market now.  This could mean that corn prices may hit a low sometime in the next month and prices may rally though harvest.  This usually only happens when the crop is not as good as expected.  It is hard to say that we could be disappointed with a record national average yield this year, but at this point expectations may be getting unrealistic.  

We have awesome CRB wall charts to give out!  They are weekly bar charts that go back 10 years to Oct, 2003 and are about the size of a poster.  If you'd like one sign up here - Corn: http://www.zaner.com/offers/index.asp?page=20  

Feel free to give me a call or shoot me an email if you would like to talk about your marketing plan, the markets, weather, or just to visit.     

December Corn Daily chart:

November Soybeans Daily chart:

December Wheat Daily chart:

All this means that speculators should be looking for opportunities and producers need to look to lock up some prices. Give me a call for some ideas. In particular, producers looking to hedge all or a portion of their production may be rather interested in some of the options / options-futures strategies that I am currently using.

In my mind there has to be a balance. Neither technical nor fundamental analysis alone is enough to be consistent. Please give me a call for a trade recommendation, and we can put together a trade strategy tailored to your needs. Be safe!

Ted Seifried (312) 277-0113 or tseifried@zaner.com

Additional charts, studies, and more of my commentary can be found at: http://markethead.com/2.0/free_trial.asp?ap=tseifrie

Futures, options and forex trading is speculative in nature and involves substantial risk of loss.  This commentary should be conveyed as a solicitation for entry into derivitives transactions.  All known news and events have already been factored into the price of the underlying commodities discussed.  The limited risk characteristic of options refers to long options only; and refers to the amount of the loss, which is defined as premium paid on the option(s) plus commissions.

FOR CUSTOMERS TRADING OPTIONS, THESE FUTURES CHARTS ARE PRESENTED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. THEY ARE INTENDED TO SHOW HOW INVESTING IN OPTIONS CAN DEPEND ON THE UNDERLYING FUTURES PRICES; SPECIFICALLY, WHETHER OR NOT AN OPTION PURCHASER IS BUYING AN IN-THE-MONEY, AT-THE-MONEY, OR OUT-OF-THE-MONEY OPTION. FURTHERMORE, THE PURCHASER WILL BE ABLE TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT TO EXERCISE HIS RIGHT ON AN OPTION DEPENDING ON HOW THE OPTION'S STRIKE PRICE COMPARES TO THE UNDERLYING FUTURE'S PRICE. THE FUTURES CHARTS ARE NOT INTENDED TO IMPLY THAT OPTION PRICES MOVE IN TANDEM WITH FUTURES PRICES. IN FACT, OPTION PRICES MAY ONLY MOVE A FRACTION OF THE PRICE MOVE IN THE UNDERLYING FUTURES. IN SOME CASES, THE OPTION MAY NOT MOVE AT ALL OR EVEN MOVE IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION.

The Soybean Volatillity may be Far from Over

Jul 29, 2014

TRADING COMMODITY FUTURES AND OPTIONS INVOLVES SUBSTANTIAL RISK OF LOSS AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR ALL INVESTORS. YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY CONSIDER WHETHER TRADING IS SUITABLE FOR YOU IN LIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES, KNOWLEDGE AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES.       

Soybeans have seen significant volatility to start the week as the market is watching the weather forecasts and export sales very closely.  Strong export sales have been a positive factor for soybeans lately.  China has stepped back to the export table in a big way.  But strong exports are taking a back seat as we look to weather to give us a clue on how big this soybean crop really is.  

The volatility seen in the first half of this week is a good example of how weather markets can trade.  Really, this may be the first real weather market we have seen this growing season.  With weather looking good, but maybe not as good as it has been, the trade has gotten a little nervous about how soybeans will finish.  This growing season has been mostly ideal so far with the exceptions being too much rain and hail damage.  This is usually a good sign that although some acres may have gotten lost or damages the rest are probably quite good.  Going forward however a cooler dryer pattern has the market wondering how soybeans will fair during the key moisture sensitive growth stage of setting pods.  Looking further out, the cooler temperatures may start to cause frost concerns as well.  

Aside from weather, export sales have been very good in the last few weeks.  The weekly sales total for soybeans last week were almost 100 million bushels.  To put this in perspective, 100 million bushels is pretty close to what a lot analysts thought we would have for a carry over this year.  This is not a small drop in the bucket.  The question is why is China buying so aggressively right now?  The answer may be simply value buying after soybean prices have come down substantially in the last few weeks.  Another possibility is that China and other global end-users are buying a percentage of their needs at this point just in case there were a major weather issue in August.  To me the sharp increase in sales over the past few weeks is likely a combination of lower price and weather risk, but there is a third possibility as well. China could be looking to build reserve stocks of soybeans and if this is the case they could continue to be strong buyers going forward.  

We have awesome CRB wall charts to give out!  They are weekly bar charts that go back 10 years to Oct, 2003 and are about the size of a poster.  If you'd like one sign up here - Soybeans: http://www.zaner.com/offers/index.asp?page=21 

It certainly is a good possibility that global end-users take a break from buying once they have a better idea that the soybean crop is going to make it through August without any major issues.  At that point they may decide that soybean prices are likely to go lower and they could buy cheaper later on.  But, if they continue to buy aggressively despite good weather and a good crop outlook then this could be telling us something else is going on.  Time will tell as it always does.   

For now weather will likely continue to be the key market mover.  As many analysts are now throwing around super sized yield forecasts the markets focus is squarely on production and how big crops could be.  But we are not out of the woods on weather yet.  Less rain in August could rob soybeans of moisture at the worst time.  An early frost could significantly hurt yield potential.  Then next few weeks could still see significant volatility as we hang on every weather forecast.  

Sign up for our Morning Ag Hedge newsletter!  Sign up here: http://www.zaner.com/offers/?page=17  

Feel free to give me a call or shoot me an email if you would like to talk about your marketing plan, the markets, weather, or just to visit.     

December Corn Daily chart:

November Soybeans Daily chart:

December Wheat Daily chart:

All this means that speculators should be looking for opportunities and producers need to look to lock up some prices. Give me a call for some ideas. In particular, producers looking to hedge all or a portion of their production may be rather interested in some of the options / options-futures strategies that I am currently using.

In my mind there has to be a balance. Neither technical nor fundamental analysis alone is enough to be consistent. Please give me a call for a trade recommendation, and we can put together a trade strategy tailored to your needs. Be safe!

Ted Seifried (312) 277-0113 or tseifried@zaner.com

Additional charts, studies, and more of my commentary can be found at: http://markethead.com/2.0/free_trial.asp?ap=tseifrie  

Futures, options and forex trading is speculative in nature and involves substantial risk of loss.  This commentary should be conveyed as a solicitation for entry into derivitives transactions.  All known news and events have already been factored into the price of the underlying commodities discussed.  The limited risk characteristic of options refers to long options only; and refers to the amount of the loss, which is defined as premium paid on the option(s) plus commissions.

FOR CUSTOMERS TRADING OPTIONS, THESE FUTURES CHARTS ARE PRESENTED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. THEY ARE INTENDED TO SHOW HOW INVESTING IN OPTIONS CAN DEPEND ON THE UNDERLYING FUTURES PRICES; SPECIFICALLY, WHETHER OR NOT AN OPTION PURCHASER IS BUYING AN IN-THE-MONEY, AT-THE-MONEY, OR OUT-OF-THE-MONEY OPTION. FURTHERMORE, THE PURCHASER WILL BE ABLE TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT TO EXERCISE HIS RIGHT ON AN OPTION DEPENDING ON HOW THE OPTION'S STRIKE PRICE COMPARES TO THE UNDERLYING FUTURE'S PRICE. THE FUTURES CHARTS ARE NOT INTENDED TO IMPLY THAT OPTION PRICES MOVE IN TANDEM WITH FUTURES PRICES. IN FACT, OPTION PRICES MAY ONLY MOVE A FRACTION OF THE PRICE MOVE IN THE UNDERLYING FUTURES. IN SOME CASES, THE OPTION MAY NOT MOVE AT ALL OR EVEN MOVE IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION.

Look at those Grain Exports!

Jul 24, 2014

TRADING COMMODITY FUTURES AND OPTIONS INVOLVES SUBSTANTIAL RISK OF LOSS AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR ALL INVESTORS. YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY CONSIDER WHETHER TRADING IS SUITABLE FOR YOU IN LIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES, KNOWLEDGE AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES.       

For almost two weeks now we have been seeing export sales announcements coming through almost every morning.  However, this grain export business has not done much to support markets so far but it could be a positive sign for things to come.  The question now is - will this increase in export business continue or was this just a short term deal?  

For the last two weeks it has seemed like every morning it was not a question of if but a question of when I would get an email from the USDA FAS announcing new export sales.  Global buyer buyers have been buying corn and especially soybeans after the recent, sharp drop in prices.  This came to a head on this weeks export sales report which confirmed very strong sales of corn and soybeans.  Corn sales of almost 45 million bushels came in almost double the high end of trade guesses and soybean sales of over 90 million bushels were almost twice the market expectations as well.  This strong export sales business is a bright spot in an otherwise dreary market climate lately.  

We have awesome CRB wall charts to give out!  They are weekly bar charts that go back 10 years to Oct, 2003 and are about the size of a poster.  If you'd like one sign up here - Corn: http://www.zaner.com/offers/index.asp?page=20  

The question now is whether this strong up tick in export sales will continue or if this was just a flash in the pan.  First of all, prices may need to stay low to continue to encourage sales.  Secondly, there is the possibility that global buyers are looking at the recent break in prices as an opportunity to make purchases on a percentage of their needs before key August weather just in case there were a problem.  Some of these purchases may be a weather hedge, if you will, for the remainder of the growing season.  So, it will be very interesting to see what happens in the next few weeks.  

At this point we are ahead of the export sales pace from last year at this time.  If this pace keeps up the USDA could be too low on their current export forecast.  And, if prices do continue to go lower exports could get even stronger.  The bottom line is that it is positive to see global grain buyers step up to the plate at current prices rather then wait for the market to continue to come down.  

For now weather will likely continue to be the key market mover.  As many analysts are now throwing around super sized yield forecasts the markets focus is squarely on production and how big crops could be.  In my experience things are rarely as good as they seem and almost never as bad as they seem.   

Sign up for our Morning Ag Hedge newsletter!  Sign up here: http://www.zaner.com/offers/?page=17  

Feel free to give me a call or shoot me an email if you would like to talk about your marketing plan, the markets, weather, or just to visit.     

December Corn Daily chart:

November Soybeans Daily chart:

December Wheat Daily chart:

All this means that speculators should be looking for opportunities and producers need to look to lock up some prices. Give me a call for some ideas. In particular, producers looking to hedge all or a portion of their production may be rather interested in some of the options / options-futures strategies that I am currently using.

In my mind there has to be a balance. Neither technical nor fundamental analysis alone is enough to be consistent. Please give me a call for a trade recommendation, and we can put together a trade strategy tailored to your needs. Be safe!

Ted Seifried (312) 277-0113 or tseifried@zaner.com

Additional charts, studies, and more of my commentary can be found at: http://markethead.com/2.0/free_trial.asp?ap=tseifrie

Futures, options and forex trading is speculative in nature and involves substantial risk of loss.  This commentary should be conveyed as a solicitation for entry into derivitives transactions.  All known news and events have already been factored into the price of the underlying commodities discussed.  The limited risk characteristic of options refers to long options only; and refers to the amount of the loss, which is defined as premium paid on the option(s) plus commissions.

FOR CUSTOMERS TRADING OPTIONS, THESE FUTURES CHARTS ARE PRESENTED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. THEY ARE INTENDED TO SHOW HOW INVESTING IN OPTIONS CAN DEPEND ON THE UNDERLYING FUTURES PRICES; SPECIFICALLY, WHETHER OR NOT AN OPTION PURCHASER IS BUYING AN IN-THE-MONEY, AT-THE-MONEY, OR OUT-OF-THE-MONEY OPTION. FURTHERMORE, THE PURCHASER WILL BE ABLE TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT TO EXERCISE HIS RIGHT ON AN OPTION DEPENDING ON HOW THE OPTION'S STRIKE PRICE COMPARES TO THE UNDERLYING FUTURE'S PRICE. THE FUTURES CHARTS ARE NOT INTENDED TO IMPLY THAT OPTION PRICES MOVE IN TANDEM WITH FUTURES PRICES. IN FACT, OPTION PRICES MAY ONLY MOVE A FRACTION OF THE PRICE MOVE IN THE UNDERLYING FUTURES. IN SOME CASES, THE OPTION MAY NOT MOVE AT ALL OR EVEN MOVE IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION.

What Happens Next in the Ukraine?

Jul 17, 2014

TRADING COMMODITY FUTURES AND OPTIONS INVOLVES SUBSTANTIAL RISK OF LOSS AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR ALL INVESTORS. YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY CONSIDER WHETHER TRADING IS SUITABLE FOR YOU IN LIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES, KNOWLEDGE AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES.       

Today, news broke that a Malaysian Airlines 777 was shot down over eastern Ukraine where pro-Russian separatists and the Ukrainian government have been doing battle.  295 lives were lost, 23 of them were US Citizens.  While I certainly do not proclaim to be an expert on Russia or the Ukraine, and bullets and missiles are a long way away from corn kernels and bean pods I find myself trying to predict what comes next and how it affects the grains markets.   

What exactly happened is not very clear.  In the aftermath of this tragedy both the pro-Russian separatists and the Ukrainian government are trading blame for the incident.  What we do know is that a plane full of innocent people was shot out of the sky at 33,000 feet (just over 6 miles high) by a BUK launched surface to air missile near the Ukrainian/Russian boarder.  What is clear is that this situation has come to a head and that when things happen of this nature there will be a reaction.  The question is what and by whom.  What happens next will be of utmost importance, not only for grains markets but for the geopolitical climate.  

This has an impact on grain markets in a few ways, but the most obvious way is Russian and Ukrainian grain production and exports.  Combined Russia and the Ukraine account for 74 million metric tons or 10.5% of the world's wheat production and 28.5 million metric tons or 19% of global wheat exports according the USDA's current estimates for 2014/2015.  The Ukraine also accounts for 27 MMT or about 3% of the world's corn production and 16 MMT or 14% of global exports.  The concern is that if this situation continues to escalate that this export capacity would be significantly reduced or lost and the rest of the world would have to look elsewhere to fill these needs.  Some of this wheat business and a good portion of the corn business could fall to the US and cut into ending stocks for next year.  So, how likely is this?  

Sign up for our Morning Ag Hedge newsletter!  Sign up here: http://www.zaner.com/offers/?page=17  

Again, I am not an expert in these matters but it would seem to me that there are two possible outcomes going forward.  The first, and I believe less likely would be that the US steps in to help the Ukraine fight the pro-Russian separatists and Russia steps in to support the rebels.  This could mean the resumption of the cold war and could mean that Ukrainian and Russian grains are lost to the rest of the world.  The other possibility would be for this thing to be solved politically and peacefully (at least from this point forward).  This could happen in a few ways, but the most logical way would be for Russia to intervene at this point and lead the charge to disband the pro-Russian rebels.  

To this point Russian President Vladimir Putin has politically positioned Russia to look like he is a peace keeper in this engagement.  The annexing of Crimea was justified by a majority population of ethnic Russians and was said to be the best solution to keeping peace.  But, now that innocent international blood has been spilled this is an opportunity for Russia and actually do what they say they are trying to do - make peace.  The ball is in Putin's court to step in and stop the pro-Russian separatists from committing any more violence, or at the very least to allow it to happen.  If this is not the case things could escalate.  

My gut feeling is that this situation will be politically resolved and that it will end up having very little if any impact on the global grain market.  However, I am not sure if this is really the path of least resistance or it is just what I hope to see happen.  Either way this situation has reached its climax and what happens now may have a significant impact on grains markets as well as the geopolitical climate.  

We have awesome CRB wall charts to give out!  They are weekly bar charts that go back 10 years to Oct, 2003 and are about the size of a poster.  If you'd like one sign up here - Corn: http://www.zaner.com/offers/index.asp?page=20  

Feel free to give me a call or shoot me an email if you would like to talk about your marketing plan, the markets, weather, or just to visit.     

December Corn Daily chart:

November Soybeans Daily chart:

December Wheat Daily chart:

All this means that speculators should be looking for opportunities and producers need to look to lock up some prices. Give me a call for some ideas. In particular, producers looking to hedge all or a portion of their production may be rather interested in some of the options / options-futures strategies that I am currently using.

In my mind there has to be a balance. Neither technical nor fundamental analysis alone is enough to be consistent. Please give me a call for a trade recommendation, and we can put together a trade strategy tailored to your needs. Be safe!

Ted Seifried (312) 277-0113 or tseifried@zaner.com

Additional charts, studies, and more of my commentary can be found at: http://markethead.com/2.0/free_trial.asp?ap=tseifrie

Futures, options and forex trading is speculative in nature and involves substantial risk of loss.  This commentary should be conveyed as a solicitation for entry into derivitives transactions.  All known news and events have already been factored into the price of the underlying commodities discussed.  The limited risk characteristic of options refers to long options only; and refers to the amount of the loss, which is defined as premium paid on the option(s) plus commissions.

FOR CUSTOMERS TRADING OPTIONS, THESE FUTURES CHARTS ARE PRESENTED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. THEY ARE INTENDED TO SHOW HOW INVESTING IN OPTIONS CAN DEPEND ON THE UNDERLYING FUTURES PRICES; SPECIFICALLY, WHETHER OR NOT AN OPTION PURCHASER IS BUYING AN IN-THE-MONEY, AT-THE-MONEY, OR OUT-OF-THE-MONEY OPTION. FURTHERMORE, THE PURCHASER WILL BE ABLE TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT TO EXERCISE HIS RIGHT ON AN OPTION DEPENDING ON HOW THE OPTION'S STRIKE PRICE COMPARES TO THE UNDERLYING FUTURE'S PRICE. THE FUTURES CHARTS ARE NOT INTENDED TO IMPLY THAT OPTION PRICES MOVE IN TANDEM WITH FUTURES PRICES. IN FACT, OPTION PRICES MAY ONLY MOVE A FRACTION OF THE PRICE MOVE IN THE UNDERLYING FUTURES. IN SOME CASES, THE OPTION MAY NOT MOVE AT ALL OR EVEN MOVE IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION.

Has Corn Gone Too Far?

Jul 15, 2014

TRADING COMMODITY FUTURES AND OPTIONS INVOLVES SUBSTANTIAL RISK OF LOSS AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR ALL INVESTORS. YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY CONSIDER WHETHER TRADING IS SUITABLE FOR YOU IN LIGHT OF YOUR CIRCUMSTANCES, KNOWLEDGE AND FINANCIAL RESOURCES.       

December corn set new contract lows today after crop conditions hit the highest level in 20 years.  At 76% Good to Excellent this is the highest rated corn crop at this time of year since 1994 when corn was 86% good to excellent.  1994 set a new record yield by a long shot, but should we already expect the same this year?  

Corn has been under significant pressure in the last 2 1/2 months with December corn falling over $1.30 off highs.  Much of this pressure has been the product of very good weather conditions and a highly rated corn crop.  Other factors include declining soybean and wheat prices as well as larger then expected old crop stocks.  There as been very little news for corn to get excited about in the last two months.  

At this point however, not only is corn very oversold but we may have taken too much weather premium out of the market.  With the Relative Strength Index (RSI) at about 19% corn is in an extreme oversold condition.  This does not necessarily mean corn will bounce, but it could be suggesting that selling pressure could ease a little in the short term at least from the technical traders.  At the same time the market has taken out any weather premium and while the corn crop certainly looks good there could still be weather issues that could hurt yield potential.  With less planted acreage this year corn needs to at least see record yield to maintain a comfortable balance sheet.  

We have awesome CRB wall charts to give out!  They are weekly bar charts that go back 10 years to Oct, 2003 and are about the size of a poster.  If you'd like one sign up here - Corn: http://www.zaner.com/offers/index.asp?page=20

The other question is when do we begin to see more value buying in corn.  With futures prices near 4 year lows it would seem likely that global and domestic end-users would be looking to fill some corn needs at lower prices.  The issue may be that China seems to have all the corn they need for now and the general perception is that corn is still going lower.  It may take a 10 cent rally to motivate buyers after such a large change in prices.  After all, why would anyone buy if there is no fear of higher prices?   

When all is said and done we certainly could end up with a new record national average corn yield and it may be by a long shot.  But, there is still months of weather to get through first before we should assume that.  An early frost could sure change the current USDA balance sheet. 

Farmer selling could be a limiting factor on a rally as many producers have not gotten enough corn sold at higher prices and are looking for that bounce to sell.  And, weather forecast still look very good.  But, as we approach 4 year lows I wonder if corn can find some support and build some weather premium back into the market at least until we know for sure what we have.

Sign up for our Morning Ag Hedge newsletter!  Sign up here: http://www.zaner.com/offers/?page=17 

Feel free to give me a call or shoot me an email if you would like to talk about your marketing plan, the markets, weather, or just to visit.     

December Corn Daily chart:

November Soybeans Daily chart:

December Wheat Daily chart:

All this means that speculators should be looking for opportunities and producers need to look to lock up some prices. Give me a call for some ideas. In particular, producers looking to hedge all or a portion of their production may be rather interested in some of the options / options-futures strategies that I am currently using.

In my mind there has to be a balance. Neither technical nor fundamental analysis alone is enough to be consistent. Please give me a call for a trade recommendation, and we can put together a trade strategy tailored to your needs. Be safe!

Ted Seifried (312) 277-0113 or tseifried@zaner.com

Additional charts, studies, and more of my commentary can be found at: http://markethead.com/2.0/free_trial.asp?ap=tseifrie  

Futures, options and forex trading is speculative in nature and involves substantial risk of loss.  This commentary should be conveyed as a solicitation for entry into derivitives transactions.  All known news and events have already been factored into the price of the underlying commodities discussed.  The limited risk characteristic of options refers to long options only; and refers to the amount of the loss, which is defined as premium paid on the option(s) plus commissions.

FOR CUSTOMERS TRADING OPTIONS, THESE FUTURES CHARTS ARE PRESENTED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. THEY ARE INTENDED TO SHOW HOW INVESTING IN OPTIONS CAN DEPEND ON THE UNDERLYING FUTURES PRICES; SPECIFICALLY, WHETHER OR NOT AN OPTION PURCHASER IS BUYING AN IN-THE-MONEY, AT-THE-MONEY, OR OUT-OF-THE-MONEY OPTION. FURTHERMORE, THE PURCHASER WILL BE ABLE TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT TO EXERCISE HIS RIGHT ON AN OPTION DEPENDING ON HOW THE OPTION'S STRIKE PRICE COMPARES TO THE UNDERLYING FUTURE'S PRICE. THE FUTURES CHARTS ARE NOT INTENDED TO IMPLY THAT OPTION PRICES MOVE IN TANDEM WITH FUTURES PRICES. IN FACT, OPTION PRICES MAY ONLY MOVE A FRACTION OF THE PRICE MOVE IN THE UNDERLYING FUTURES. IN SOME CASES, THE OPTION MAY NOT MOVE AT ALL OR EVEN MOVE IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION.

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