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Corn College in the South and Planter Clinic Scheduled for January

November 7, 2011
By: Rhonda Brooks, Farm Journal Seeds & Production Editor
 
 

Strong prices the past few years and a positive forecast for the future have many southern farmers looking to capitalize on corn production.

 
If that describes your outlook for the near term, consider sharpening your corn management and production skills during these two day-long events scheduled for January 10-11, 2012: Corn College and Planter Clinic events in the South.
 
You can register for one or both events at these links:
All Day Events
Desoto Civic Center
4560 Venture Drive
Southaven, Mississippi
402-330-0289
 
The Corn College and Planter Clinic will feature Farm Journal Agronomists Ken Ferrie and Missy Bauer.
 
During Corn College, Ferrie and Bauer will help farmers learn how to implement the Systems Approach to corn production. The agronomists also will share their in-the-field data to help farmers grow more bushels and better manage soil density, disease, insects and soil fertility.
The following day, Ferrie and Bauer will instruct farmers on the process of tuning their planter for peak performance from the hitch pin to the closing wheel.
 
These two events were developed in response to farmer requests for management information and production tools. This is the second year for both.
 
“The Systems Approach provides the foundation for taking yields to a higher level,” Ferrie says. “It helps farmers understand how many different variables there are that they have to manage to achieve top yields.”
 
“It’s easy to focus on one thing, but farmers need to bring all those components together for success,” Bauer notes. “The more parts of the system that you can take care of, the better your outcome.”
 
Bauer adds that managing the corn planter effectively in the field is another important element in the corn production equation.
Alabama farmer Jeff Webster says while he has grown corn all of his life, he believes there are management practices he can still improve upon.
 
“I was here to learn from other guys about what they’re doing that may help me in my operation, and to communicate what I’m doing with no-till and cover crops that could benefit them,” reports Webster, who grows dryland corn near New Hope, Ala.  
 
Webster participated in the 2011 Corn College event and says having the opportunity to connect with like-minded growers was an added bonus the event provided, along with the first-rate classroom instruction Ferrie and Bauer provided.
 
For more information about Corn College events, visit the Corn College homepage www.FarmJournalCornCollege.com

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