Farm Journal: Early Spring 2017


Magazine Features

  • Who Owns the Waters of the Deep?
    03/22/2017

    These menacing words of maniacal oilman Daniel Plainview were spoken in the final scene of There Will Be Blood, set in 1927 in California: “Drainage. Drainage … My straw reaches across the room and starts to drink your milkshake. I drink your milkshake! I drink it up!” Ninety years later, questions about ownership of another natural resource have fueled a new controversy carrying sledgehammer legal implications for agriculture: I drink your groundwater.

  • Who's Planting Dicamba-Tolerant Crops This Year?
    03/22/2017

    Are you and your neighbors ready for dicamba?

  • The Role of Phosphorus in Starter
    03/20/2017

    Test Plots study differences between in-furrow orthophosphate, polyphosphate fertilizers.

  • Cow Herd Numbers Continue Up
    03/18/2017

    Average profit expected to drop to $45 per cow in 2017 

  • Ag Mergers on Track
    03/18/2017

    Though some regulators have yet to weigh in, companies expect to close this year

  • Opportunities Despite Tough Market
    03/18/2017

    Ready to step up productivity, the ag industry gathered in San Antonio, Texas, for the annual Commodity 
    Classic. 

  • Wheat Journal
    03/18/2017

    Figuring out the optimum nitrogen (N) rate is no easy feat thanks to year-to-year and field-to-field variability. 

  • From The Farm Journal Family
    03/18/2017

    Agricultural news from Farm Journal

  • 5 Changes that Bring Profit
    03/18/2017

    In light of a tough year, farmers are re-examining their production and management practices. 

  • All Roads Lead Home
    03/18/2017

    What do this engineer, builder and zoologist have in common?

  • DIY Tech Expertise Helps Shave Costs
    03/18/2017

    From an automatic gate entry to an airplane, this South Dakota farmer makes it all

  • Policy To-Do List for Ag
    03/15/2017

    The policy issues under serious discussion in Washington, D.C., are many, but two in particular top the list of priorities for U.S. farmers—immigration and trade.


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