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AgDay Daily Recap -May 29, 2013

May 29, 2013
 
 

TODAY ON AGDAY

MAY 29, 2013

 

CROP PROGRESS:

GOOD MORNING I'M CLINTON GRIFFITHS. RAIN OVER PARTS OF THE MIDWEST THIS PAST HOLIDAY WEEKEND MAY FURTHER DELAY SOME FARMERS WHO ARE TRYING TO FINISH-UP THEIR SPRING PLANTING. KEN ALSO WARNS THAT INSECTS COULD BE A BIG PROBLEM. HE SAYS PRODUCERS ALREADY NEED TO BE OUT SCOUTING FOR CUT WORM AND STALK BORER.

CROP PROGRESS:

AS FAR AS CROP PROGRESS THIS WEEK - CORN PLANTING REACHED 86-PERCENT, UP 15 POINTS FROM LAST WEEK'S HUGE GAIN. THE PACE IS JUST FOUR POINTS BEHIND AVERAGE.
COLORADO, INDIANA AND WISCONSIN HAD THE BIGGEST ONE WEEK GAINS.
THERE WAS A DRAMATIC IMPROVEMENT IN THE AMOUNT OF CORN CROPS THAT HAVE NOW EMERGED. IT'S NOW BETTER THAN HALF. WHILE STILL LAGGING THE AVERAGE PACE, IT HAD A 35-POINT GAIN FROM THE PREVIOUS WEEK. SOYBEAN PLANTINGS SAW A 20-POINT JUMP FROM THE PREVIOUS WEEK WITH 44-PERCENT NOW IN THE GROUND. THE FIVE YEAR AVERAGE REMAINS WELL AHEAD. NOW TO WINTER WHEAT - 60-PERCENT HAS REACHED HEADING STAGE...A 17 POINT CLIMB FROM LAST WEEK AND A DOZEN POINTS BEHIND AVERAGE.

OKLAHOMA WHEAT HARVEST:

AND SPEAKING OF WHEAT, THE OKLAHOMA WHEAT COMMISSION SAYS THE FIRST LOAD OF GRAIN IS AT THE ELEVATOR. THE GRADFIELD CO-OP REPORTED THE FIRST LOAD WHEAT TUESDAY. THEY ESTIMATE YIELD TO BE 15 BUSHELS TO THE ACRE, WITH MOISTURE LEVELS JUST UNDER 15 AND TEST WEIGTS AT 58 POUNDS. MANY MORE AREAS EXPECT TO BE STARTED IN THE NEXT 7 TO 10 DAYS.

CROP WATCH:

WHEAT HARVEST IS ALSO UNDERWAY IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. BUT IN THE MIDWEST, THERE ARE PLENTY OF WET FIELDS. HERE'S MIKE HOFFMAN WITH WEDNESDAY'S CROPWATCH.

PORK PRICES:

IT MUST HAVE BEEN A GOOD HOLIDAY FOR U.S. PORK. HOG FUTURES ARE NOW AT A 10 MONT HIGH.

BLUEBERRY CROP:

DEPENDING ON YOUR REGION OF THE COUNTRY, BLUEBERRY SEASON MAYBE AT ITS PEAK, WHILE OTHERS ARE STILL WAITING FOR THE FIRST "PICK" OF THE SEASON. BECAUSE OF THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF THE BERRY, CONSUMER DEMAND HAS BEEN GROWING IN RECENT YEARS. FARMERS IN MISSISSIPPI ARE TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE OPPORTUNITY. IN THIS REPORT FROM MISSISSIPPI STATE, AMY TAXYLOR TELLS US HOW PRODUCERS ARE TRYING TO MAXIMIZE THEIR BLUEBERRY PRODUCTION.
ANALYSIS:

WHILE IT'S EASY TO GET CAUGHT WITH A MICRO-PERSPECTIVE--WHAT'S HAPPENING AT MY HOUSE OR IN MY FIELDS--WE CAN'T FORGET ABOUT THE MACRO OR WORLDLY PERSPECTIVE OF ECONOMY AND CROP PRODUCTION. AL PELL AND MIKE HOGAN JOIN US FOR THAT DISCUSSION IN TODAY'S ANALYSIS.

KALEIDOSCOPE MAKER:

30 YEARS AGO, LEONARD OLSON WAS CLIMBING THE CORPORATE LADDER AND MAKING A GOOD LIVING. BUT A HEALTH SCARE 16 YEARS AGO BROUGHT THE POMEROY, IOWA MAN TO A TURNING POINT IN HIS LIFE. NOW, HE WORKS BY HIS OWN RULES, AT HIS OWN PACE. IN THE PROCESS, HE TURNS OUT SOME AMAZING WOODEN WONDERS. AL JOENS FROM AGDAY AFFILIATE KTIV-TV HAS HIS STORY. LEONARD'S FULL-SIZE WOODEN KALEIDOSCOPES START AT ABOUT 60 DOLLARS. HE ALSO HAS SMALLER ONES THAT START AT 18 DOLLARS AND HE SELLS PLASTIC KIT KALEIDOSCOPES FOR TEN. YOU CAN FIND OUT MORE BY VISITING HIS WEBSITE, WWW.KALEIDOSCOPEFACTORY.COM.

PLANT DIVERSITY:

WE KNOW AGRICULTURE HAS GOTTEN MUCH MORE PRODUCTIVE IN THE LAST 100 YEARS.
BUT NOW A GROUP AT THE UNITED NATIONS SAYS THAT PRODUCTIVITY IS COSTING DIVERSITY.

OLIVE USES:

OLIVE OIL IS GAINING IN POPULARITY HERE IN THE STATES. BUT DID YOU KNOW THAT FOR EVERY GALLON OF OLIVE OIL THAT'S PRESSED FROM THE RIPE FRUIT, 38 POUNDS OF OLIVE SKINS, PULP AND PITS ARE LEFT BEHIND. THIS WASTE IS CALLED POMACE AND TYPICALLY AREN'T WORTH MUCH. WELL RESEARCHERS WITH USDA ARE WORKING TO FIND A USE FOR THE STUFF OUT IN CALIFORNIA WHERE MOST OF THE NATION'S COMMERCIAL OLIVES ARE GROWN. THEY'RE WORKING ON A WAY TO DRY THE MATERIAL DOWN SO IT CAN BE EASILY SHIPPED. NEW POTENTIAL USES INCLUDE COMPOUNDS FOR FOODS, PHARMACEUTIALS, OR EVEN COSMETICS.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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