Jul 24, 2014
Home| Tools| Events| Blogs| Discussions| Sign UpLogin

Day 2 Press Release: Pro Farmer 2013 Midwest Crop Tour

August 21, 2013
 
 

The second day of the 2013 Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour concluded with the release of official results from Indiana and Nebraska. Indiana samples resulted in an average corn yield of 167.36 bu. per acre and an average soybean pod count of 1,185.14 in a 3'x'3 square. Nebraska samples resulted in an average corn yield of 154.93 bu. per acre and an average soybean pod count of 1,138.94 in a 3'x'3 square.

The eastern leg traced a route from Fischers, Indiana to Bloomington, Illinois and surveyed strong corn and soybean crops, though both are in need of rain.

Pro Farmer Senior Market Analyst and Eastern Tour Director Brian Grete noted, "When the samples from all 12 eastern Tour routes were tabulated, the Indiana corn yield came in 47.8% better than last year. Overall, Indiana has a good corn crop, but like Ohio, the crop is going to need late-season rain to hold onto yield potential that's in the field, especially in the driest areas."

The soybean crop was also above the previous year's samples and the three-year average and plants in Indiana are generally healthy with scattered occurrences of Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS).

Eastern Tour Consultant Mark Bernard said, "The disease and insect pressure both yesterday and today have been light. A little dab of SDS was found in Putnam Co. but nothing after that. Not to say it couldn’t crop up in places, but if more doesn't show up soon, chances are, disease won’t be a factor."

The western leg of Crop Tour followed a route through Nebraska where scouts observed some inconsistency in the corn crop and an "unimpressive" soybean crop.

Western Tour Leader and Pro Farmer Editor Chip Flory commented, "The real variable in Nebraska is the dryland crop. When there's consistency in the dryland crop, it helps support the overall yield in the state. The biggest problem we saw on Tour is the irrigated crop didn't blow through the roof to lift the top end of the yields. The bottom line on Nebraska corn is too much of it was planted after the middle of May into less-than-ideal conditions and it hasn't had enough sunlight or warm temperatures. That's not how to build a big corn yield. There's still a lot to be determined for the 2013 Nebraska corn and soybean crops."

Western Tour Consultant Jason Franck said, "As I saw on Monday, one big advantage of the soybeans was that they were disease-free and quite healthy. Moving east though, the drought stress picked up considerably. Over the next 10 days, I truly feel a timely rain could provide a 10% to 20% added bonus to this soybean crop. Without this help, the additional chance to add pods and fill them out appropriately could be lost.."

Today, Tour scouts on the eastern leg will begin their day in Bloomington, Illinois and scouts will travel to Iowa City, Iowa. The western leg of the Tour will depart from Nebraska City, Nebraska and scouts will make their way toward Spencer, Iowa. Final results from Illinois and western Iowa will be released tonight.

For more information:


 

See Comments

RELATED TOPICS: Crop Tour Coverage, croptour

 
Log In or Sign Up to comment

COMMENTS

No comments have been posted



Name:

Comments:

Receive the latest news, information and commentary customized for you. Sign up to receive Beef Today's Cattle Drive today!. Interested in the latest prices for cattle in your area? See highlights of the latest for-sale cattle in the Cattle-Exchange eNewsletter.

 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions