Fall Tillage Tips for Dry Fields

September 6, 2012 11:18 PM
 

Take advantage of a dry fall to fix compaction issues in your field.

Your dry, cracked field could use a little attention this fall, says Ken Ferrie, Farm Journal field agronomist.

"Each field is a little different, when you’re talking about soil density," Ferrie says. But, this year you can have the biggest tillage impact, due to dry soils.

He says running tillage equipment over parched fields will increase lift and shatter. He suggests leveling off your fields, especially if you have large dirt clods after harvest. "This is the perfect year to take out wheel tracks and compaction."

Ferrie shares his tips:

 

For More Information
Read the latest harvest news and check out AgWeb’s Corn Harvest Map and Soybean Harvest Map.
 


 

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Anonymous
9/7/2012 10:14 AM
 

  OR, plant cover crops for soil health! Tillage in a drought?!? A diverse cover crop mix will begin to biologically resolve compaction, improve water infiltration and retention, increase beneficial bacteria and fungi in your soil, and prepare your field for anything the next growing season has in store. :)

 
 
Anonymous
9/7/2012 10:14 AM
 

  OR, plant cover crops for soil health! Tillage in a drought?!? A diverse cover crop mix will begin to biologically resolve compaction, improve water infiltration and retention, increase beneficial bacteria and fungi in your soil, and prepare your field for anything the next growing season has in store. :)

 
 
Anonymous
9/7/2012 11:02 AM
 

  Last year, Minnesota had a very dry fall and [nearly] everyone tilled deep and the landscape was scattered with soil boulders as hard as bowling balls. The snow and rain eventually melted them, but it looked like a person may not even be able to plant in some fields. Since the fall and winter was warm, they also burned up as much carbon in the soil as one could expect. In and May when we recieved ~ 12" of rain, you could tell which fields were managed how by the size of the ponds by the runoff. With the dry summer after May, we have been living off that foot of May rain. I concluded that despite this hot, dry summer, the soil apparently needs a bit more "hell" in it. Because the corn looked a lot better in those fields that farmers didn't till the "hell" out of it...

 
 
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