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AgDay Daily Recap -May 7, 2013

May 7, 2013
 
 

TODAY ON AGDAY

MAY 7, 2013

 

CROP PROGRESS:

GOOD MORNING I'M CLINTON GRIFFITHS. A WEEK OF RAINY, WET AND COLD CONDITIONS LED TO ANOTHER TEPID WEEK OF PLANTING PROGRESS.

IMMIGRATION:

IN WASHINGTON, THE IMMIGRATION DEBATE IS EXPECTED TO RESUME THIS WEEK. THE SENATE VERSION OF THE BILL HEADS FOR MARKUP IN THE SENATE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE.

HORSE SLAUGHTER:

IT APPEARS THE HORSE-SLAUGHTER FACILITY IN NEW MEXICO IS STILL WAITING ON PAPERWORK. AS WE TOLD YOU LAST WEEK, VALLEY MEAT - FILED SUIT AGAINST USDA, COMPELLING THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO PROVIDE INSPECTORS FOR THE PLANT. WITHOUT THE INSPECTORS, THE FACILITY COULD NOT OPERATE. THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT TOLD THE COMPANY LAST WEEK IT WOULD ISSUE A "GRANT OF INSPECTION" IN A DAY OR TWO. AGRITALK CHECKED WITH VALLEY MEAT YESTERDAY, THEY SAY THE DOJ AND FSIS ARE TELLING THEM TO EXPECT THE PAPERWORK ANYDAY OR ANY MOMENT NOW.

NEW MEXICO DROUGHT:

IF YOU THINK IT'S BEEN DRY WHERE YOU LIVE, TAKE A LOOK AT THIS? THIS IS FROM DENESE RUNYUN IN NORTH EAST NEW MEXICO--FULL DISCLOSURE HERE'S, SHE'S A COUSIN OF MINE. BUT TAKE A LOOK AT WHAT THE DROUGHT HAS DONE TO PARTS OF THAT STATE. BLOW SAND IS NEARLY UP TO THE ROOF OF THIS ABANDONED HOUSE. AND HERE CREWS ARE STRUGGLING TO KEEP SAND AND DIRT FROM OVERTAKING ROADWAYS. MIKE HOFFMAN JOINS US FROM THE AGDAY WEATHER CENTER WITH A LOOK THE DROUGHT SITUATION IN NEW MEXICO.

CROP WATCH:

THAT NORTHEASTERN PART OF THE STATE DID GET SOME RAIN YESTERDAY. BUT IT'LL TAKE MUCH MORE TO START IMPROVING THE SITUATION. ACCORDING TO THE LATEST DROUGHT MONITOR NEW MEXICO IS THE DRIEST IN THE NATION. MORE THAN 80 PERCENT IS IN EXTREME DROUGHT AND A QUARTER OF THE STATE IS EXCEPTIONALLY DRY. THE PAST THREE YEARS HAVE BEEN THE 4TH DRIEST ON RECORD AND THE DRIEST SINCE THE 1950'S. AVERAGE RAINFALL FOR THE STATE IS ABOUT HALF OF NORMAL. IN CALIFORNIA, THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES CONDUCTED ITS LAST SNOWPACK MEASUREMENT OF THE SEASON. AND THE RESULTS ARE NOT ENCOURAGING FROM THE SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS. THE SURVEYORS FOUND THE WATER CONTENT IS ONLY 17-PERCENT OF NORMAL. WINTER STARTED OUT STRONG - WITH WATER CONTENT AT 134-PERCENT OF NORMAL. BUT THEN JANUARY AND FEBRUARY WERE VERY DRY. THE STATE EXPECTS IT WILL ONLY DELIVER 35-PERCENT OF REQUESTED AMOUNTS TO WATER AGENCIES.

CALIFORNIA MILK PRICES:

IN NEWS FROM OUR PARTNERS AT DAIRY TODAY MAGAZINE - CALIFORNIA DAIRY FARMERS RECEIVED SOME MIXED NEWS WHEN IT COMES TO MILK PRICING. CURRENTLY, CALIFORNIA DAIRYMEN DO NOT FOLLOW FEDERAL MILK PRICING ORDER. AN AG COMMITTEE IN THE STATE LEGISLATURE PASSED A BILL WHICH DEALS WITH THE STATE'S MILK PRICING REGULATION. HOWEVER, THE MEASURE STRIPPED OUT LANGUAGE THAT WOULD REQUIRE THE STATES' DEPARTMENT OF AG TO ALIGN REGULATED CHEESE PRICES WITH FEDERAL MILK MARKET ORDER PRICES. DAIRY TODAY SAYS - IN ESSENCE - THE ASSEMBLY ASKED THE STATE'S DAIRY FUTURE TASK FORCE TO COME UP WITH RECOMMENDATIONS AND FIND THEIR OWN SOLUTIONS.

WISCONSIN HERDS:

NEW NUMBERS OUT OF WISCONSIN SHOWS THE NUMBER OF DAIRY FARMS IN WISCONSIN CONTINUES TO FALL. IT'S NOW DROPED BELOW 11-THOUSAND. THE STATE HAS LOST ABOUT 600 HERDS IN THE LAST YEAR. THE NUMBER OF COWS IN THE STATE, HOWEVER, REMAIN HIGH WITH MORE THAN ONE POINT 2 MILLION HEAD.

BEEF EXPORTS:

BASED ON DATA FROM THE AG DEPARTMENT, BEEF EXPORTS ARE DOWN FROM A YEAR AGO. THE U-S MEAT EXPORT FEDERATION ANALYZED THE DATA. FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH, BEEF EXPORTS DROPPED SEVEN PERCENT FROM A YEAR AGO IN TERMS OF VOLUME. WRAPPING-UP THE FIRST QUARTER OF THE YEAR, BEEF EXPORTS ALSO FINISHED DOWN - ABOUT FOUR PERCENT. BY VALUE, HOWEVER, IT'S AHEAD BY FIVE PERCENT.

PORK EXPORTS:

NOW TO THE PORK SECTOR - MONTH OF MARCH TOTALS WERE DOWN 18-PERCENT FROM A YEAR AGO. THE U-S MEAT EXPORT FEDERATION SAYS THOSE SHARPLY LOWER EXPORTS WERE DUE TO MARKET CLOSURE IN RUSSIA. LARGER DOMESTIC SUPPLIES IN ASIA ARE ALSO TO BLAME, AS THEY WEAKENED THE DEMAND FOR U-S PORK. MEANWHILE, FIRST-QUARTER PORK EXPORTS WERE DOWN 12% FROM LAST YEAR'S RECORD PACE IN VOLUME AND 11% LOWER IN TERMS OF VALUE.

SYRUP PRODUCTION:

MAPLE SYRUP PRODUCERS ARE USING NEW TECHNOLOGY TO SIMPLIFY PRODUCTION THAT IS HELPING THEM EXPAND TO NEW MARKETS AROUND THE WORLD. THE A-P'S RITA FOLEY TAKES US TO NEW YORK WHERE TAPPING TREES AND HARVESTING SAP FOR SYRUP IS GETTING AN UPGRADE.

TYSON EARNINGS:

IN AGRIBUSINESS TODAY, TYSON FOODS HAD A ROUGH MONDAY ON THE STOCK MARKET.
THE COMPANY ROLLED OUT WHAT ANALYSTS CONSIDERED A DISAPPPOINTING EARNINGS REPORT. IT MISSED ON PROJECTIONS FOR PROFITS PER SHARE AND ON REVENUES. TYSON SAYS IT'S BEEN DEALING WITH INCREASING COSTS RELATED TO DROUGHT AND TIGHT FEED SUPPLIES. THE STOCK CLOSED THE DAY ABOUT A DOLLAR LOWER.

ANALYSIS:

GRAIN MARKETS ENDED THE DAY LOWER WITH SOYBEAN CONTRACTS FALLING BETWEEN 12 AND 20 CENTS. BUT LOWER PRICES WON'T CHANGE THE FACT THERE JUST AREN'T A LOT OF BEANS TO GO AROUND. AL PELL DISCUSSES THE LOW SOYBEAN CARRYOUT AND WHAT IT COULD MEAN FOR MARKETS THROUGH 2013.

COMMUNITY ORCHARD:

THERE'S A GROWING POPULARITY IN SOME OF THE NATION'S INNER CITIES TO TAKE VACANT LOTS - OFTEN JUST AN EYESORE - AND TURN THEM INTO GREEN SPACE, LIKE GARDENS. IN HOPKINSVILLE, KENTUCKY, ORGANIZERS DECIDED TO TAKE IT A STEP FURTHER – BY PLANTING AN ORCHARD OF APPLE TREES. IN THIS REPORT PROVIDED BY THE U-K COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, JEFF FRANKLIN TELLS US HOW THEY HOPE THE ORCHARD WILL NOT ONLY PROVIDE FRESH FRUIT, BUT THAT IT WILL ALSO BECOME A SOURCE OF COMMUNITY PRIDE FOR RESIDENTS.

BREAKFAST BOOM:

APPARENTLY WE'RE WISING UP WHEN IT COMES TO STARTING THE DAY WITH THE RIGHT NUTRITION.

MILK AND CHALK:

SOLVING ONE PROBLEM MAY BE CREATING NEW ONES FOR TEACHERS. THE ADVENT OF DUSTLESS CHALK COULD BE A HEALTH RISK FOR STUDENTS WITH A MILK ALLERGY.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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