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RSS By: Bob Utterback, Farm Journal

Bob Utterback has more than 26 years of experience and offers producers a disciplined approach to marketing.

Commodities weaker across the board!

May 25, 2010
Commodities were weaker across the board today, as the dollar was up sharply, almost 88 points and the Dow was down over 200 points below the 9800 support level. It all goes back to growing concerns over the European debt situation that is not leveling out. Instead fears are growing that it could intensify and become even more deflationary on the world economy.
So the question being asked, is this a buying opportunity for commodities or it time to be careful? Our prospective here at UMS is we are focused heavily on being short now because of growing concern that demand is going to be flat to declining and supply is building which will grow stocks for corn, beans and wheat.  
As a seller we also know based upon seasonal patterns, clear risk exists over the next three to four weeks. I saw one study suggesting the odds are greater than 80% that July beans would rally from Memorial Day weekend into mid- to late-June. I essentially do not want to argue with this seasonal bias.
I however have limited interest in trying to speculatively buy the market for this potential bounce. Instead, I would focus on making sure all short positions are prepared for a bounce and be lining up financing to ensure all positions can be held and actually increased if we are able to get a solid price bounce over the next 45 days.
The overhead resistance for December corn right now is $3.90 to $3.96, for November beans $9.45 and $5.55 for December wheat.  My suggestion is you need to sell very aggressively around these levels and then prepared to defend if you get much more than a 5% price event move.
In summary: Since the outside markets are getting increasingly volatile more than ever we need to focus on profit. We remain committed to selling the summer rally and then preparing this fall to buy commodities for the feed buying and reownership commitments.
BEFORE TRADING, ONE SHOULD BE AWARE THAT WITH POTENTIAL PROFITS THERE IS ALSO POTENTIAL FOR LOSSES, WHICH MAY BE VERY LARGE. YOU SHOULD READ THE “RISK DISCLOSURE STATEMENT” AND “OPTION DISCLOSURE STATEMENT” AND SHOULD UNDERSTAND THE RISKS BEFORE TRADING. COMMODITY TRADING MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR RECIPIENTS OF THIS PUBLICATION. THOSE ACTING ON THIS INFORMATION ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR OWN ACTIONS. ALTHOUGH EVERY REASONABLE ATTEMPT HAS BEEN MADE TO ENSURE THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED, UTTERBACK MARKETING SERVICES INC. ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ERRORS OR OMISSIONS. ANY REPUBLICATION OR OTHER USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND THOUGHTS EXPRESSED HEREIN WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF UTTERBACK MARKETING SERVICES INC. IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED. COPYRIGHT UTTERBACK MARKETING SERVICES INC. 2010.
 
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COMMENTS (46 Comments)

Anonymous
1.80 corn 5.00 beans, you must be selling the meth. Bob you need to get control of these kids. If corns goes to 1.80 you should buy all you can, agree with 11:14 they have no clue whats out there. Just figures out of the air. Wet here just enought to stop field work not a lot.
10:19 AM Jun 7th
 
Anonymous
By the way who pays all these ignorant people to come up with all these LUDICROUS guesses, I sure hope it it isn't farmers.
10:17 PM Jun 6th
 

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