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RSS By: Bob Utterback, Farm Journal

Bob Utterback has more than 26 years of experience and offers producers a disciplined approach to marketing.

Why is December corn down?

Apr 13, 2009
Today was one of those wet, soggy overcast days in central Indiana where you wake up, look out and really want to simple roll over and stay in the warm bed!  The crops are not getting planted in the Midwest just like our weather firm has been suggesting. The weather pattern is expected to keep planters at bay for most of April and early May and along with strong exports today, one would have thought the market would be surging higher.

So why is December corn down, off the $4.351/2 high of last week to today’s low of $4.141/2 or 21 cents which means for every 100,000 bushels of unpriced corn a lost value of $21,000 and the crops are not even in the ground!  What gives?

Well I’m kind of scratching my head just like you. My only answer lies in the outside markets. The Fed last week said the economy was going to continue to decline for next six months with unemployment going up. The stock market shook off this bearish news last week and moved higher. Today is different, at one point the Dow was off over 100 points but midday it recovered, and the bond market surged back. It would suggest concern is growing that another economic stimulus is going to be necessary or the fed is going to continue to keep interest rates historically low. In a nut shell it seems the market is saying for grains demand is a bigger concern.  Essentially, the vote seems to suggest unless we have an actual confirmation of acreage shift from corn to beans the market is not interested in moving higher.

This would imply we are going to have to look at the calendar very carefully for trend direction in both the corn and beans.  While I’m not getting my rally now as expected it does suggest if the wet conditions continue into the second week of May the market could dramatically shift direction and intensity for corn and beans.

Because of this uncertainty I continue to strongly support any sales that are being implemented during this time for corn and beans be done in the form of long puts rather than cash or futures. My intent will be to roll the puts into futures or cash sales as we get into the late June to early May. 

Bottom line: I want to get a floor in place on the pre-planting highs because of my long term concern about the negative economy and big producer cash holding position. I will move from a defensive selling posture to an aggressive position as we move into the late June to early July pollination weather scare time period.

If we can help you with your 2009 or 2010 hedging program [using cash and futures], please give us a call at 1-800-832-1488 or email me at utterback@utterbackmarketing.com or laura@utterbackmarketing.com.
BEFORE TRADING, ONE SHOULD BE AWARE THAT WITH POTENTIAL PROFITS THERE IS ALSO POTENTIAL FOR LOSSES, WHICH MAY BE VERY LARGE. YOU SHOULD READ THE “RISK DISCLOSURE STATEMENT” AND “OPTION DISCLOSURE STATEMENT” AND SHOULD UNDERSTAND THE RISKS BEFORE TRADING. COMMODITY TRADING MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR RECIPIENTS OF THIS PUBLICATION. THOSE ACTING ON THIS INFORMATION ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR OWN ACTIONS. ALTHOUGH EVERY REASONABLE ATTEMPT HAS BEEN MADE TO ENSURE THE ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION PROVIDED, UTTERBACK MARKETING SERVICES INC. ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ERRORS OR OMISSIONS. ANY REPUBLICATION OR OTHER USE OF THIS INFORMATION AND THOUGHTS EXPRESSED HEREIN WITHOUT THE WRITTEN PERMISSION OF UTTERBACK MARKETING SERVICES INC. IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED. COPYRIGHT UTTERBACK MARKETING SERVICES INC. 2009.
 
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COMMENTS (1 Comments)

Anonymous
The reason the markets are going all over the place has nothing to do with fundamentals of commodity supply/demand or even basic economic worries etc. The traders make money on volatility. We're not dumb farmers. No offense, but I'll bet you and any other market watcher couldn't tell with any accuracy what will happen tomorrow. They can tell us what ever they want but some Sheik farts in Persia and oil will jump $20/barrel b/c supply changed? My answer, lets ship them some bean-o!
5:26 PM Apr 13th
 

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