Stamp Farms Land, Equipment to Hit the Auction Block

March 4, 2013 10:00 AM
 
Mike Stamp farm

A land auction, which includes 2,200 acres of farmland in 26 parcels, a large shop and storage building and three homes on smaller acreage, will be held March 27 at noon in Lawton, Mich.

The auction, a result of Mike Stamp and Stamp Farms, LLC declaring bankruptcy in November, will be held at the Lawton Community Center, 646 North Nursery Street, Lawton, MI 49065. Miedema Auctioneering, Inc. was appointed by the secured creditors and trustees to host the auction. The properties for sale were not part of the bulk sale to Boersen Farms, Inc.

The land for sale is located in Cass and Van Buren counties. Of the 2,200 acres for sale, 1,500 acres are center-pivot irrigated. For information about the land, including soil types for each property, and a bidder’s packet, call (800) 527-8243. Bidder registration will begin at 11 a.m. the day of the auction. Internet and phone bidding will be available, but bidders must pre-register by 3 p.m. March 25. Interested individuals should call (800) 527-8243 and ask for Donna.

Download the auction brochure with parcel outlines. You can also see information from USDA’s Farm Service Agency, water well and pump records, center-pivot information and pictures.

Miedema Auctioneering will also sell trucks, trailers and snowmobiles at 10 a.m. the following day, March 28, at 72718 Territorial Rd., Decatur, MI 49045. Highlights include five Ford pickup trucks from 2004 to 2008, two Kenworth Semi Tractors (1998 and 1999), a 2000 Timpte and Service Truck. The sale is expected to last one hour; no small items will be auctioned.
 

Read more about Stamp Farms:

February 18, 2013

 

January 9, 2013

 

Dec 07, 2012
 
 
December 4, 2012

 

November 27, 2012
 
 
November 19, 2012
 
 
October 31, 2012

 


 

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Anonymous
3/4/2013 11:09 AM
 

  What happened to all the shop tools?

 
 
Anonymous
3/14/2013 10:52 AM
 

  Probably weren't many. Those kind of people don't actually work on stuff. They just put up a big shop to get a picture in Farm Journal, then park a big tractor and shinny new combine in for when they have people over for a seed corn meeting or an occasional graduation party.

 
 
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