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AgDay Daily Recap -June 24, 2013

June 24, 2013
 
 

TODAY ON AGDAY

JUNE 24, 2013

 

MONSANTO WHEAT UPDATE:

GOOD MORNING I'M CLINTON GRIFFITHS. SO HOW DID GENETICALLY ENGINEERED WHEAT END UP IN AN OREGON FIELD THAT WAS NEVER PART OF A SEED TRIAL AND WASN'T IN THE SEED THE FARMER PLANTED OR HARVESTED? THAT'S THE QUESTION MONSANTO IS ASKING.

OREGON GE SABBOTAGE:

ELSEWHERE IN OREGON FARM COUNTRY, THE F-B-I IS ASKING THE PUBLIC FOR HELP. IT'S INVESTIGATING A MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT CRIME THAT LEFT A CROP OF SUGAR BEETS IN RUINS. IT HAPPENED IN RURAL JACKSON COUNTY. THE ROUND UP READY BEETS WERE BEING GROWN AND MANAGED BY SYNGENTA. AUTHORITIES SAY AN INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP OF PEOPLE DESTROYED ABOUT 65-HUNDRED PLANTS ON TWO SEPARATE NIGHTS. F-B-I CONSIDERS IT ECONOMIC SABOTAGE--AND IT'S AGAINST FEDERAL LAW. THERE'S CURRENTLY A 10-THOUSAND DOLLAR REWARD.

KANSAS WHEAT HARVEST:

IN KANSAS, WHEAT HARVEST IS NOW IN FULL SWING. LAST MONDAY, USDA SAID COMBINES WERE YET TO ROLL BUT FIELDS BEGAN TO DRY AS THE WEEK WORE ON. EARLY LOADS FROM SOUTH CENTRAL KANSAS PUT YIELDS AT A RESPECTABLE 50-60 BUSHELS PER ACRE.

OKLAHOMA WHEAT UPDATE:

LAST YEAR HARVEST IN OKLAHOMA WAS MUCH FURTHER ALONG AT THE END OF JUNE. WHEN USDA RELEASES IT'S CROP PROGRESS REPORT LATER TODAY IT SHOULD SHOW A BIG INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF HARVESTED ACRES. AS OF A WEEK AGO, 30% OF THE CROP HAD BEEN CUT. THE FIVE YEAR AVERAGE IS 65 PERCENT.

TORNADO CLEANUP:

OKLAHOMA HAS HAD ITS FAIR SHARE OF CHALLENGES RECENTLY. HUNDREDS OF VOLUNTEERS DESCENDED UPON THE STATE TO HELP FARMERS WHEN NUMEROUS FIELDS BECAME UN-INTENTIONAL DUMPING GROUNDS FOLLOWING THAT MASSIVE TORNADO IN MOORE, OKLAHOMA. THAT SAME STORM KILLED TWO DOZEN PEOPLE, DESTROYED 11-HUNDRED HOMES AND LEVELED TWO ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. SEVEN CHILDREN DIED IN ONE OF THOSE SCHOOLS. FIELDS WERE LITTERED WITTH SHEETS OF TIN, SPLINTERED WOOD, INSULATION. IN THIS REPORT PROVIDED BY OKLAHOMA STATE'S SUN-UP, AUSTIN MOORE SHOWS US HOW STRANGERS ARE STEPPING-UP TO HELP CLEAR "FIELDS IN NEED".

CROP WATCH:

FROM BARLEY HARVEST IN VIRGINIA TO CHERRY PICKING IN WASHINGTON, HERE'S CINDI CLAWSON WITH CROP WATCH ON THIS MONDAY MORNING. GOOD MORNING CINDI.

ACREAGE ESTIMATES:

IN AGRIBUSINESS TODAY - IN ADVANCE OF THE USDA ACREAGE REPORT COMING OUT THIS FRIDAY, SOME OF THE MAJOR FIRMS HAVE RELEASED THEIR PRE-REPORT ESTIMATES. ANALYSTS FROM INFORMA ECONOMICS SAY U-S FARMERS PLANTED 95-POINT-TWO MILLION ACRES OF CORN. THAT'S NEARLY TWO MILLION FEWER ACRES THAN LAST YEAR. AND TWO MILLION LESS THAN USDA'S ESTIMATE IN MARCH TURNING TO BEANS - INFORMA EXPECT 77-POINT-SEVEN MILLION ACRES. THAT'S A DROP OF A HALF MILLION ACRES FROM INFORMA'S ESTIMATE LAST MONTH. MEANWHILE ALLENDALE IS GOING EVEN LOWER. IT'S PROJECTING 94-POINT-THREE IN CORN. THAT'S NEARLY THREE MILLION ACRES LOWER THAN USDA'S MARCH ESTIMATE. AND ALLENDALE SAYS SOME OF THOSE ACRES WENT TO SOYBEANS, WHERE THEY ARE PROJECTGIN 79- POINT--TWO IN SOYBEANS.
ANALYSIS:

FARM DIRECTOR AL PELL SAT DOWN WITH ONE OF THE KEY ANALYTS FROM ALLENDALE, FOR THIS MORNING'S ANALYSIS.

CITY FIELD MOMS:

A GROUP OF URBAN AND SUBURBAN MOMS FROM THE CHICAGO AREA ARE LEARNING HOW FARMERS GROW CROPS AND RAISE PIGS. IT'S PART OF A PROGRAM CALLED "FIELD MOMS".     "ILLINOIS FARM FAMILIES" IS A CONSORTIUM OF SEVERAL ILLINOIS FARM GROUPS WHO WANT TO HELP TEACH THE REALITIES OF CROP AND LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION. FOR MANY OF THESE "CITY MOMS" IT'S THEIR FIRST EXPOSURE TO THE RURAL WAY OF LIFE.
AS WES MILLS TELLS US, THESE CONSUMERS ARE GETTING THEIR FOOD QUESTIONS ANSWERED AND LEARNING WHAT GOES INTO FARMING.

GRAIN HANDLING DANGER:

WHEN IT COMES TO GRAIN HANDLING THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SAYS DEATHS AND INJURY ARE HAPPENING FAR TOO OFTEN. THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION SAYS MANY OF THOSE COULD BE PREVENTED.

ENERGY DRINK BAN:

AND FINALLY THIS MORNING, THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION SAYS ITS NOW SUPPORTING A BAN ON MARKETING ENERGY DRINKS TO PEOPLE UNDER 18.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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