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Severe Storms to Hang Over Upper Midwest

June 30, 2014
By: Nate Birt, Top Producer Deputy Managing Editor google + 
corn field storm
  

As producers look beyond today’s USDA acreage and stocks reports, severe storms will continue in the short-term throughout the upper Midwest. That’s according to weather experts on the U.S. Farm Report Market Roundtable. Meanwhile, drought conditions will linger in Texas and California.

"The pattern is established right now," says Brad Rippey, USDA meteorologist, in reference to the upper Midwest storms. "We’re seeing a lot of energy coming in off of the Pacific, and that just continues to light up the skies across the upper Midwest. For a lot of the Grain Belt, that’s good news because it means regular, frequent rains. But in that concentrated area across the upper and northern Plains, and into the upper Midwest, (there’s) just too much rain."

Meanwhile in the West, there aren’t many good reasons to expect an end to drought anytime soon.

Power Hour Noon Logo"I think the Far West has to hope for a moderate, stronger El Nino to try to get some of that moisture in there," explains Mike Hoffman, U.S. Farm Report meteorologist. "Right now, the pattern is that the troughs keep digging into the West—which is east of them—because it brings up the Pacific and the Gulf moisture into areas east of California. I don’t see a lot of relief coming anytime soon for them."

The state of California has had three years of subpar moisture, Rippey adds, meaning the state is locked into drought at least until November or December. Meanwhile, a recent pattern of rain will help Texas, but problems will persist, Hoffman says.

"West Texas and neighboring areas have been in drought for three and a half years, since the fall of 2010," Rippey notes." It would take over the next three months, during the summer months, 12" to 18" of rain—which is almost a year’s worth for that part of the country—to get out of this drought. It’s because the subsoil moisture deficits are so great after this three-and-a-half-year drought."

Click the play button below to watch the complete U.S. Farm Report Market Roundtable weather discussion:


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