Sep 30, 2014
Home| Tools| Blogs| Discussions| Sign UpLogin

State HRW Wheat Weather Reports

April 24, 2012
By: Julianne Johnston, Pro Farmer Digital Managing Editor
 
 

Following are details from the state Crop/Weather Report:

Kansas: Temperatures continued to be mostly above normal across Kansas last week with only light precipitation. Thirty-four of the 53 stations received no precipitation while only two stations received more than half an inch. Columbus and Pittsburg in the Southeast District received 0.58 inches and 0.51 inches, respectively. High temperatures ranged from the mid 70’s to mid 80’s, and low temperatures ranged from the low 30’s to low 40’s. Eight stations reported low temperatures at or below freezing, and six stations reported average temperatures below normal. Last week, producers averaged 5.6 days suitable for fieldwork as all districts reported over 4.5 days suitable. Because of limited rainfall last week, topsoil moisture conditions slightly declined to 4 percent very short, 13 percent short, 77 percent adequate, and 6 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies also slightly declined to 5 percent very short, 19 percent short, 73 percent adequate, and 3 percent surplus. Producers continue to spray wheat for insects and disease, plant corn, and cut alfalfa, while a few producers have begun to plant soybeans, sorghum, and cotton.

The Kansas wheat crop continues to progress three weeks ahead of the average. Nearly all the crop has jointed, as the statewide average is 97 percent, ahead of 59 percent last year and the 5-year average of 62 percent. Forty-five percent of the wheat crop has already headed, well ahead of 5 percent last year and the 5-year average of 2 percent. The Northwest and West Central districts are below 10 percent headed while the South Central and Southeast districts are more than 80 percent headed. The condition of the wheat crop decreased slightly to 2 percent very poor, 5 percent poor, 25 percent fair, 51 percent good, and 17 percent excellent. Insect damage to the wheat continues to increase to 19 percent light, 5 percent moderate, and 1 percent severe, while disease damage also increased to 26 percent light, 11 percent moderate, and 2 percent severe.

Texas: Areas of East, Central, and South Texas and thePanhandle received rainfall last week. Coastal Texasreceived 5 inches of rainfall or more for the week while other areas observedscattered showers. Cutting andbaling of small grains forhay was active around the state. Wheat and oats were fully headed out in manyareas. However, dryland wheat was stressed in some locations due to insufficient moisture. In North Texas, there were reports of armyworm and rust problems in wheat.

Oklahoma: Most of the week was clear with average highs in the low 70s. Small grains and canola continued to thrive amid spring temperatures and replenished soil moisture from the previous week’s rain. Heading of wheat and rye was nearing completion, and over a third of the canola crop was reported as mature. Some wheat has been cut for hay, as have other forages and over a third of alfalfa acres. Planting of sorghum, soybeans and peanuts began, and corn emerged was ahead of normal. Most of northwestern Oklahoma was without significant rainfall last week and the average rainfall for the state was only 0.2 of an inch. The highest rainfall totals fell in central and eastern Oklahoma. One storm system brought hail across Caddo, Grady and McClain counties on Thursday. Subsoil moisture condition ratings continued to show improvement: 64 percent was rated adequate to surplus. Topsoil moisture conditions continued to have 83 percent ranked adequate or better. There were 5.0 days suitable for field work. Conditions continued to be rated mostly good for all small grains and canola; three-quarters or more of each crop was rated good to excellent. Progress continued to outpace the five-year average with soft dough development observed in wheat and rye. Wheat heading was 89 percent complete by the end of the week, 30 points ahead of last year and 51 points ahead of the five-year average. Fifteen percent of the crop had reached the soft dough stage of development.

Nebraska: For the week ending April 22, 2012, field activities picked up momentum but were slowed due to damp soils, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Corn planting increased to 14 percent complete during the 4.3 days suitable for fieldwork. Seeding of oats was 85 percent complete with about half of the crop emerged. Wheat jointed, at 59 percent, continued two and one half weeks ahead of average. In general, temperatures averaged one degree below normal across the northern half of the state and one degree above normal across the south. Highs reached the upper 70’s and lows fell to the high 20’s in the Panhandle. Light precipitation fell across much of the state with most areas receiving less than half an inch. Portions of Boyd and Holt Counties in North Central Nebraska received over 1.5 inches. In general, temperatures averaged one degree below normal across the northern half of the state and one degree above normal across the south. Highs reached the upper 70’s and lows fell to the high 20’s in the Panhandle. Light precipitation fell across much of the state with most areas receiving less than half an inch. Portions of Boyd and Holt Counties in North Central Nebraska received over 1.5 inches.

Colorado: Colorado experienced scattered showers last week but still received below average precipitation with above average temperatures. Overall, mountain snowpack is 38 percent of average raising concerns about the availability of irrigation water this growing season. Farmers were allowed 6.3 days in the field for spring operations. Winter wheat progress increased to 52 percent jointed with the crop rated in mostly fair to good condition. The winter wheat reported being pastured remained at 1 percent. Spring barley was 60 percent seeded with 36 percent emerged by the end of the week compared with the 5-year average of 50 percent and 19 percent, respectively.


 

See Comments

RELATED TOPICS: Cotton

 
Log In or Sign Up to comment

COMMENTS

No comments have been posted



Name:

Comments:

Receive the latest news, information and commentary customized for you. Sign up to receive Top Producer's eNewsletter today!

 
 
The Home Page of Agriculture
© 2014 Farm Journal, Inc. All Rights Reserved|Web site design and development by AmericanEagle.com|Site Map|Privacy Policy|Terms & Conditions