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February 2012 Archive for Hedging Corn and Soybeans

RSS By: Howard Tyllas, AgWeb.com

Howard Tyllas is currently a member of the Chicago Board of Trade and registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission as a floor broker and as a Commodity Trading Advisor.

WASDE Report for 2/9/12

Feb 09, 2012

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Are you tired of listening to the same BULL ****, and services that do not have a plan if the market goes down instead? Hedge means to take risk off the table, and my service has all producers 100% hedged and they do have most of the upside unhedged (if we can rally for whatever reason). Hedge with a Pro and option expert who has been trading grains for 36 years.

WASDE Report for 2/9/12

OILSEEDS: U.S. soybean supply and use projections for 2011/12 are unchanged this month, leaving ending stocks at 275 million bushels. Soybean exports are projected at 1.275 billion bushels, down 226 million from last year. Although soybean export commitments through January trail last year's pace by more than 226 million bushels, lower soybean crop forecasts and reduced export projections for Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay are expected to be offset by additional U.S. sales and exports during the second half of the marketing year.

The U.S. season-average soybean price range for 2011/12 is narrowed to $11.10 to $12.30 per bushel compared with $10.95 to $12.45 last month. Soybean oil prices are forecast at 50.5 to 54.5 cents per pound, and soybean meal prices are projected at $290 to $320 per short ton, both unchanged from last month.

Global oilseed production for 2011/12 is projected at 452.5 million tons, down 4.9 million tons from last month. Brazil soybean production is forecast at 72 million tons, down 2 million due to lower projected yields. The reduction reflects hot, dry conditions in southern Brazil in December and January. Argentina soybean production is projected at 48 million tons, down 2.5 million. Despite widespread rains in recent weeks, the extended hot, dry period during planting and early crop development limited plantings and reduced yield prospects. Paraguay and Uruguay soybean production estimates are also reduced this month. Other changes include higher rapeseed production for China and Russia, lower rapeseed and sunflowerseed production for Kazakhstan, and higher cottonseed production for Pakistan.

Global oilseed trade for 2011/12 is projected at 110.5 million tons, down 2.6 million mainly reflecting reduced soybean export projections for Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay. Soybean imports are reduced for China, EU-27, South Korea, Russia, and several Middle East countries. China soybean imports are reduced 1 million tons to 55.5 million reflecting lower-than-expected October-December imports. Global oilseed ending stocks are projected at 71.2 million tons, down 3.6 million from last month. Reduced soybean stocks in Brazil and Argentina account for most of the change.

WHEAT: U.S. wheat ending stocks for 2011/12 are projected lower this month. Exports are raised 25 million bushels supported by the stronger-than-expected pace of sales and shipments, particularly for competitively priced feed-quality wheat. Projected exports of Soft Red Winter and White wheat are each raised 15 million bushels on strong demand from Mexico and South Korea. Exports are also projected higher for Hard Red Winter wheat, up 5 million bushels, based on sales and shipments to date. Projected Hard Red Spring wheat exports are lowered 10 million bushels as strong domestic premiums for spring wheat continue to limit demand. Ending stocks for all wheat are projected 25 million bushels lower at 845 million. Based on prices reported to date and the lower expected carryout, the 2011/12 projected season-average farm price is raised 20 cents on the bottom end of the range to $7.15 to $7.45 per bushel.

Global wheat supplies for 2011/12 are projected 2.1 million tons higher with larger beginning stocks in Kazakhstan and increased production for India, Kazakhstan, and Morocco. Kazakhstan beginning stocks are raised 0.6 million tons with reduced domestic consumption for 2010/11. India production for 2011/12 is increased 0.9 million tons reflecting the latest government revisions, which increased yields for the crop that was harvested last spring. Kazakhstan production is raised 0.2 million tons based on the recent official estimate. Production for Morocco is raised 0.2 million tons also on official revisions to estimated yields in a crop that was harvested several months ago.

Global trade is raised slightly for 2011/12 with world imports increased 0.7 million tons. Small increases in imports are made for Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Chile, and Ethiopia. Export reductions for Ukraine, Canada, and India are more than offset by increases for Russia, the United States, Argentina, and Brazil. Global wheat consumption is reduced 1.0 million tons mostly reflecting a 1.6-million-ton reduction in India food use. Partly offsetting are small increases in food use for Australia, Chile, Ethiopia, and Kazakhstan. Global wheat feeding is nearly unchanged with a 1.0-million-ton reduction for Kazakhstan offset by increases for Ukraine, Saudi Arabia, Canada, and Mexico. Global ending stocks for 2011/12 are raised 3.1 million tons to a record 213.1 million. As projected, 2011/12 global wheat stocks would be 2.4 million tons higher than the previous record in 1999/2000.

COARSE GRAINS: U.S. feed grain ending stocks for 2011/12 are projected lower this month as increases in corn and oats imports are more than offset by higher expected corn exports. Projected corn and oats imports are raised 5 and 10 million bushels, respectively, based on the strong pace of shipments during the most recently reported September-November quarter. U.S. corn exports are projected 50 million bushels higher with reduced supplies in Argentina and recent increases in both sales and shipments. Corn ending stocks are projected 45 million bushels lower at 801 million. The projected range for the season-average farm corn price is narrowed 10 cents on both ends of the range to $5.80 to $6.60 per bushel.

Global coarse grain supplies for 2011/12 are projected 3.1 million tons lower mostly reflecting reduced corn production prospects in Argentina and, to a lesser extent, Paraguay. Argentina corn production is lowered 4.0 million tons to 22 million as field reports confirm that high temperatures and extensive dryness during pollination in late December and early January resulted in irreversible damage to early corn in the central growing region. Late planted corn, which has been on the increase in recent years, will help offset some of the earlier losses, but additional rainfall is needed to stabilize production prospects. Corn production is lowered 0.4 million tons for adjacent Paraguay where hot, dry weather also reduced area and yields. Partly offsetting are small corn production increases for EU-27 and the Philippines. Global barley production is raised with Argentina production up 0.7 million tons on higher reported area and yields for the crop that was harvested during late 2011.

Global coarse grain trade for 2011/12 is raised with higher corn imports for EU-27 and higher barley imports for Saudi Arabia, EU-27, and Jordan. Partly offsetting is a reduction in corn imports for Canada. Higher corn exports for a number of countries offset a 4.5-million-ton reduction for Argentina. Along with the projected increase for the United States, corn exports are raised 2.0 million tons for Ukraine, 0.5 million tons each for Brazil and EU-27, and 0.2 million tons for Russia. Barley exports are lowered 1.0 million tons for Ukraine, but raised 0.7 million tons for Russia, 0.5 million tons for Argentina, and 0.3 million tons each for Canada, EU-27, and Kazakhstan.

Global coarse grain consumption for 2011/12 is raised slightly with higher barley feeding in Ukraine and Jordan and higher corn feeding in Argentina and Ukraine. Corn feeding, however, is lowered for Canada and barley feeding is lowered for Kazakhstan and Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia is expected to rebuild stocks as world barley production has rebounded from a 40-year low in 2010/11. Global coarse grain ending stocks for 2011/12 are lowered, with a 2.8-million-ton reduction in corn stocks and a 0.6-million-ton reduction in barley stocks. At the projected 125.4 million tons, global corn ending stocks would be the lowest since 2006/07.

SUGAR: Projected U.S. sugar supply for fiscal year 2011/12 is increased 86,000 tons, raw value, from last month, due to higher production more than offsetting lower imports. Florida cane sugar production is increased 130,000 tons based on processors( production projections reported in Sweetener Market Data. Imports are decreased 44,000 tons, as a 219,000-ton decrease from Mexico more than offsets a 100,000-ton increase in re-export imports and a 75,000-ton increase attributed to corrected import data from U.S. Customs. Total use is decreased 170,000 tons. Domestic food use is lowered 250,000 tons based on a slower-than-expected pace to date. Exports and deliveries for re-export products are increased a combined 80,000 tons in line with the increase in re-export imports.

For Mexico, official data for 2010/11 show lower imports, higher domestic use, and lower ending stocks than estimated last month. For 2011/12, Mexico's projected domestic use is raised and ending stocks are raised commensurately. Also, Mexico(s 2011/12 imports of sugar due to the U.S. sugar re-export program are increased. The net result of these changes is lower 2011/12 sugar exports.

LIVESTOCK, POULTRY, AND DAIRY: The 2012 forecast of total red meat and poultry production is lowered from last month as reduced broiler meat production is expected to more than offset higher forecast beef, pork, and turkey production. Lower expected broiler weights are underpinning the reduced forecast, with hatchery data continuing to point toward fewer birds for slaughter during most of 2012. Beef production is raised from last month. Despite expected tight fed cattle supplies, cow slaughter is expected to remain relatively strong during the first quarter and carcass weights are forecast higher. Pork production is raised as first-quarter slaughter and first-half carcass weights are expected to be higher than forecast last month. Egg production is lowered slightly for 2012. Estimates of 2011 meat and egg production are adjusted to reflect December data.

The beef export forecast for 2012 is reduced slightly but poultry exports are raised. The pork export forecast is unchanged from last month. Import forecasts are unchanged from January. Beef and pork trade estimates for 2011 are unchanged but poultry exports are raised due to stronger-than-expected shipments in November.

Cattle prices for 2012 are raised from last month, reflecting tight supplies of fed cattle. The hog price forecast is unchanged from last month. Broiler prices are raised, reflecting lower production, and turkey prices are raised on current price strength. The egg price range is narrowed.

The milk production forecast for 2012 is raised. Milk cow numbers are raised for much of the year as USDA's Cattle report indicated 1 percent more dairy cows on January 1, 2012. However, producers are holding 1 percent fewer heifers for addition to the dairy herd, which is expected to push cow numbers lower later in the year. Milk per cow forecasts are raised as milk per cow in the last quarter of 2011 was higher than expected and mild weather in much of the country is supporting increased early year yields. Milk production estimates for 2011 are raised, reflecting end-of-year production data. Fat-basis trade estimates for 2011 are increased due to both stronger-than-expected imports of butteroil and exports of cheese during November. The skim-solids export estimate for 2011 is raised largely on relatively strong November exports of whey and skim milk powders. This strength is expected to carry into this year, thus the skim-solids export forecast for 2012 is raised as well.

With higher forecast 2012 production, cheese and butter prices are lowered. The nonfat dry milk (NDM) price is lowered to reflect slightly weaker early year prices. With stronger forecast demand for whey, the whey price forecast is raised. The lower cheese price is expected to more than offset the higher whey price, resulting in a reduced forecast Class III price. Lower butter and NDM prices result in a lower Class IV price. The all milk price for 2012 is lowered to $18.00 to $18.70 per cwt.

COTTON: The 2011/12 U.S. cotton estimates reflect marginally lower domestic mill use compared with last month. With no change in the production estimate, the total cotton supply is unchanged. Domestic mill use is lowered 100,000 bales, reflecting lower than anticipated activity in recent months. The export estimate is unchanged. Ending stocks are raised 100,000 bales to 3.8 million, for a stocks-to-use ratio of 26 percent. The forecast range for the average price received by producers of 87 to 93 cents per pound is narrowed 1 cent on each end.

The 2011/12 world cotton estimates include sharply higher supplies, due to higher beginning stocks and production. Beginning stocks are raised 1.6 million bales, mainly reflecting increased estimates for India's production in 2009/10 and 2010/11 by the India Cotton Advisory Board. World 2011/12 production is raised 505,000 bales due largely to higher estimated production for Pakistan, which is based on ginning arrivals. Forecast world consumption is reduced slightly, including decreases for Thailand, the United States, and others. World trade is raised, due to a 1.0-million-bale increase in the import forecast for China. World ending stocks are now forecast at 60.8 million bales, an increase of nearly 14 million bales from the beginning level. The stocks-to-consumption ratio of just over 55 percent is sharply higher than the past two seasons and about equal to the 2008/09 level.

RICE: No changes are made on the supply side of the U.S. 2011/12 rice supply and use balance sheet. On the use side, the export forecast is lowered 1 million cwt from a month ago to 89 million-all in long-grain. The rough rice export projection is lowered 1 million cwt to 32 million, while forecast combined milled- and brown-rice exports are unchanged at 57 million. The reduction in the export projection is due primarily to the slower-than-expected pace of sales and shipments to date to mostly to Central America because of increased competition, mainly from Brazil, and greater domestic supplies in some countries. The decrease in the export forecast resulted in an increase in ending stocks of 1 million cwt to 39.5 million, down almost 9 million from the previous year. Long-grain and combined medium- and short-grain rice stocks are forecast at 21.6 million and 15.2 million cwt, respectively.

The projected U.S. average milling yield for 2011/12 is reduced to 70.00 percent, down 0.75 percentage points from last month, but still above 68.86 percent for 2010/11. The change is based on data supplied by the Rice Millers' Association of the USA Rice Federation for August through December and on expectations for the remainder of the marketing year.

The 2011/12 long-grain, season-average price range is projected at $13.40 to $14.00 per cwt, down 10 cents per cwt on the low end of the range and down 50 cents per cwt on the high end with the midpoint down 30 cents. The combined medium- and short-grain price range is projected at $15.20 to $15.80 per cwt, down 20 cents per cwt on both ends of the range with the midpoint unchanged. The all rice season-average price range is forecast at $13.90 to $14.50 per cwt, up 10 cents per cwt on the low end of the range, but down 30 cents per cwt on the high end, and down 10 cents at the midpoint. The price projections are based on National Agricultural Statistics Service reported prices through December and expected prices the remainder of the marketing year. Global trading prices have been trending down in recent weeks as competition for markets has been very keen with the addition of India as a large exporter.

Global 2011/12 projections of rice production, consumption, trade and ending stocks are raised from last month. The increase in the global rice production forecast is due mostly to increases for India and the Philippines, which are partially offset by reductions for Brazil, Egypt, Argentina, and the United States. The U.S. rice crop (milled equivalent basis) is lowered slightly resulting entirely from the decrease in the average milling yield. India's rice crop is forecast at a record 102 million tons, up 2 million from last month due to an increase in both harvested area and yield. According to the U.S. agricultural counselor in New Delhi, favorable 2011 monsoon rains coupled with overall good weather conditions in the major rice producing areas supported higher kharif rice acreage and productivity. The Brazil rice crop is lowered 340,000 tons due to the effects of drought in Rio Grande do Sul, an important rice producing State. Global exports are raised by 1.4 million tons, primarily due to an increase for India and Egypt, which are partially offset by reductions for Thailand, Vietnam, and the United States. Forecast India exports are raised 2 million tons to a record 6.5 million tons, while exports for Thailand and Vietnam are lowered 500,000 and 200,000 tons, respectively. Forecast imports are sharply raised for Egypt based on information from the agricultural counselor in Cairo. Global ending stocks are up slightly from last month to 100.1 million tons mainly due to an increase for the Philippines.

Want to know what I think for tomorrow and going forward?

The 6 markets now covered daily are Soybeans,Corn, Crude oil, S&P, 30 yr TBond and Gold

My numbers usually are sent at least 12 hours (via your email) in advance of the next day open outcry session. Subscribers use them as best suited to their own needs and sometimes that involves the overnight trade.

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Email: dailynumbers@futuresflight.com
http://www.futuresflight.com/

Tel.1-312-573-2699, 1-312-823-9189

Disclaimer: No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are tempted. Futures trading involve risk.In no event should the content of this be construed as an express or implied romise, guarantee or implication by or from Howard Tyllas, that you will profit or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. No such promises, guarantees or implications are given. Past results are no indication of future performance

March Soybean and Corn Numbers & Trade Ideas for 1/30/12

Feb 02, 2012

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Are you tired of listening to the same BULL ****, and services that do not have a plan if the market goes down instead? Hedge means to take risk off the table, and my service has all producers 100% hedged and they do have most of the upside unhedged (if we can rally for whatever reason). Hedge with a Pro and option expert who has been trading grains for 36 years.

 

Want to know what I have to offer that other services do not?

 

Sign up: Free 1 Day Trail of Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas

 

This report was sent to subscribers on 1/27/12 9:00 p.m. Chicago time to be used for trading on 1/30/12.

 

March Soybeans

 

After the close recap on 1/30/12: In my daily soybean numbers on Monday; my pivot acted as resistance and was .01 from the actual high, my support was .02 ¼ from the actual low.

March Corn

After the close recap on 1/30/11: In my daily corn numbers on Monday; my pivot acted as resistance and was .03 ½ from the actual high; my support was .02 from the actual low.

All charts and numbers for 1/31/12 have already been sent to subscribers at 2.00 pm on 1/30/12.

 

March Soybeans


12.37 ¾
12.31
--------------12.19 ½ Pivot
12.08
12.02
11.87 FG
5 day chart... Up from last week same day
Daily chart .... Down
Weekly chart ... Down
Monthly chart Up $12.96 is the 200 DMA
ATR 23 ½ Overbought 82%

 

 

For 1/30/12: Downtrend line and then last week's low supports, December high resists.

 

In my daily soybean numbers on Friday; my pivot acted as resistance and was .00 ¼ from the actual high, my support was .01 ¾ from the actual low.

 

 March Corn

6.64 ¼ 2012 High
6.51 ½ pre-Final report settle
6.47 ½ Downtrend Line
-----------6.39 ¼ Pivot
6.31
6.25 ½

5 day chart.... Up from last week same day
Daily chart ...... Down
Weekly chart .......Down
Monthly chart .... Sideways 6.66 ½ is the 200 DMA
ATR 14 ½ Ex. Overbought 92%

 

 

For 1/30/12: Downtrend line was indeed strong resistance and stopped the bulls in their tracks. It was the 3rd time at the line which is the strongest time.

In my daily corn numbers on Friday; my resistance was .05 ¼ from the actual high; my pivot acted as support and was .05 ½ (only .01 ¼ in open outcry) from the actual low.                                                    
 

1/30/12:

Grains: Spot on soybean numbers, accurate corn numbers. Uncertainty of fundamentals is restricting trading to the numbers and average trade range. Perception is the driver now, and the bulls think the USDA has baked in a bearish scenario they do not believe is accurate, I do not know, nor does any bull or bear, so I rather bet on charts and the numbers I derive from them. With record basis (difference between cash and futures) never seen at this time of the year, it is a demand driven rally, not a supply issue. The corn is there, but not in the hands of the users. I do not want to regurgitate the fundamentals, that could be skewed to fit your position, but rather would trade without thought or regard to the fundamentals.

Downtrend line has kept corn prices from advancing, but if and when it is broken, the 2012 high of $6.64 ¼ would be next. It will stop going up when it stops going up, so I look forward being able to have the chance to sell against 4 month highs that were tested in 3 of the 4 months. If it does not hold I will lose $.04, but if it holds I can target a $.25 profit near $6.40 (it would be a retest of the downtrend line which would act as support) and as always it would be a very good day trade.

Soybeans are having trouble at $12.30, let alone the high made on the first trading day this year at $12.44 ¾. It looks like it wants to be the first to turn over and start heading down. With higher lows every day last week, the upside is still in play. Gap left from last Friday at $11.87 will be good support.

All producers who follow my service should be able to be completely relaxed this week because you should have locked in $6.30 puts or higher, and at the same time your bin will make at least $.10 more if the market can sustain $6.50 or higher. If we can rally this week you can roll up your call strike, and roll up your put protection too. That way you can lock in more profit, and give a chance to make more if we continue to rally. Nothing to do at the downtrend line now because it should have already been done, but if we can rally to $6.64 or beyond would be the next place to do so. If we hang out here, or come down $.30, there is still nothing to do until we get closer to the March option expiration. The only thing you can do if we come down, is to buy back the calls you sold and look to resell at a higher strike for more money than you paid to buy back your calls. Taking baby steps and picking up $.10 here and $.20 there, usually risking $.05 or less, is my way of trading. It is much easier to make $1 on both up and down moves, than to make $1 in one direction especially on 1 trade.

I want to continue to trade the numbers with a bearish bias and risk $.04 in corn and $.06 in soybeans using a stop to protect

1/27/12: Grains: Spot on grain numbers! A 6 day $.50+ corn rally to the downtrend line was all that was needed to take profits if long, and sell like I always do when at the downtrend line of any market. The amount of times that the downtrend line holds compared to the times it is broken, truly places the odds in my favor as if I was the casino owner, not the player who feels lucky and wants to bet it will (like betting against the heavy favorite in sports).

Soybeans also failed at the first resistance, but the uptrend line is still intact. I think we will see some profit taking going into the weekend. Just as there was no reason to take out the bracket line support after the Jan Final report, there is no reason to have them rally higher than pre-report settlements.

I want to continue to trade the numbers with a bearish bias and risk $.04 in corn and $.06 in soybeans using a stop to protect.

1/26/12: Grains: Spot on soybean numbers and corn resistance, corn support was helpful at best. Corn looks poised to retest the downtrend line resistance. It looks more of a matter of flushing grain from farmer's hands rather than real demand. Soybean chart has an almost perfect steep uptrend line by connecting the lows since Jan 12 (not drawn). Look at the chart and you will see that all steep up and downtrend lines have held since the highs were made in August. When this uptrend line breaks, I would exit all long positions.

Option premium is being taken out daily, and the market is moving significantly in an orderly fashion. The less you read the better off you will be right now. All the fundamentals will do for you, is justifying staying in a losing trade way past the point you should have exited. Fundamentals are clearly bearish at this point in time, and unless production decreases from here, expect much lower prices once SA is secure on production.

WGN's Tom Skilling (the CBOTs' favorite TV weatherman, when he comes on at noon, they show him on the big screen on the floor) "This winter's the mildest in Chicago to date in 78 years--since the winter of 1933-34. It's run 11.3-degrees milder than last year with half the snow!" Other forecasters note that La Nina's can last up to three years, meaning this one could be roughly 50% complete and threaten US crops this summer, but Australia's weather bureau, thought to be the world's authority on La Nina/El Nino, believes this one will die out into spring, opening up the possibility for a good growing season in the US this summer. Place your wagers here, just another Vegas game called "Weather" that the CBOT takes bets on.

Options offer the exact "odds" no different from an odds board at the racetrack. Settlements are the exact "overnight odds" that give you the odds of probabilities for that option to be "in the money" on expiration. Any outcome can be wagered that will reflect 100% of what you think, including if you think the price on expiration will be the same as it was when you entered the position. I will try on the weekends when I have time, to go into 1 example of this per week, and show you how I look at options, and how you can figure the odds. Only a few of the people I know that started with me on the floor trading options, have the mindset like I do and can perceive "odds" which greatly helps in understanding what strategy to use that will best reflect what you think the market will do. You would be lucky if you can find this in any options book (the odds, to find the best strategy to use). I have gone into many before, but new subscribers in the last few months can use it, and old subscribers might be interested now, and this time they can copy, paste, and save to read again in time. I want to trade the numbers with a bearish bias and risk $.04 in corn and $.06 in soybeans using a stop to protect.

1/25/12: Grains: Spot on soybean numbers and corn support, corn resistance was accurate. Fundamentals started today with calls for a lower open based on rain and whatever else the wires were "pitching", but within minutes March corn went positive on the day. It gained strength as the day went on, and it spilled over to soybeans. My numbers pegged the market, and first support and resistance was not violated. This is a normal trading session, with the market doing its job daily as an auction process, and goes up until the last buyer has bid, and goes down to the place where only the last person is selling. As you can tell in my comments lately, I am keeping my eye on fundamentals, but I see nothing of substance to have a bias longer term other than what I have said before. If we get the crop they are talking and we have an average trend yield, we should see $4 corn by harvest, otherwise a shortfall of expectations could maintain current price levels, but a substantial shortfall will be all is needed to send us to new all time highs. If anyone gives a hint that they offer anything more than a guess to where we will be next month, let alone at harvest, is someone you should not pay any attention to.

As I have said since the last report, if I wanted to buy corn it would be the old crop, and if I wanted to sell it would be new crop corn. Record basis for corn at this time of the year has flushed a couple of my producers to sell some cash. One place in Illinois that was $.35 under when the hedge was made in December 2010 got to sell at $.04 over on Tuesday. $.39 for the entire crop year is a very good income, let alone on the basis alone. We got the basis, we finally got $7+ after starting with an original hedge of $5.50, had some protection the entire time, and now making more income on the way back up!

Bearish one day bullish the next and bearish again did not matter; it was the strategy and your ability to execute it that mattered. The thing that is out of sight out of mind is the fact that we do not need to buy more put protection for the old crop or new, but I am always aware that by not spending or losing money, is like making money. I do not take anything for granted, and by remembering the times I saved money, makes it easier to spend when I do need it. Remember, my mindset is always in it for the long haul, it is like a casino owner that wants the odds in the long run in his favor, and makes sure he keeps it that way. If you let protection get too far away from you, it is no different than the casino giving the odds instead of getting them. As in life, if you do the right thing long enough, you should be better off than if you did not. And even if you "beat the odds" in the short term, the price you pay for the stress you get, is not worth it.

I really consider my producers a success story now, and they can laugh off the fact that they are not "Mr. Perfect" and smile what they have accomplished and earned instead. They are empowered, and by learning how to be in control of how they do things, leads to much lower stress than when they used to rely on others. All will read this and think I am talking about them, and yes you are right, I am talking to all of you. Yes, some have learned well and still will keep on learning even more, and some are on the path and know the basics as they watch the results, but all have executed well and should take all the credit for execution, and whatever bullish or bearish bias (by the strikes they use) allowed optimal results. Sometimes great, sometimes not, but always making something if we can rally.

Since the basis is so strong at this time, the function of the market right now is to pry corn out of the hands of whoever has it. When the market gets their fill, right back down we go and look for new buyers. Now that almost everyone has rolled into March call options, all we need to do is wait and see if the market will put more money in our pocket by rallying, or to watch the calls waste away before we roll to May. Only each producer can say when the best time for them to sell cash, but remember, it is without question to do it on a rally, or when put option spreads are almost intrinsic equal to the futures, or anytime when above the put strike you are long is really best. I want to trade the numbers with a bearish bias and risk $.04 in corn and $.06 in soybeans using a stop to protect. Smaller ATR lets me risk less to get my reward.

Want to know what I think for tomorrow and going forward?

The 6 markets covered daily are Soybeans, Corn, Crude oil, S&P, 30 yr T Bond and Gold.

My numbers usually are sent at least 12 hours (via your email) in advance of the next day open outcry session. Subscribers use them as best suited to their own needs and sometimes that involves the overnight trade.

Find out why my subscribers from Canada, China, India, Switzerland, South Korea, and the UK keep renewing this service.

HowardTyllas Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas cover 6 markets for less than $10 a day.

HowardTyllas Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas is designed to help you plan your trading strategies for the coming day.

 

$199.00 USD for each month, renewable monthly

 

HowardTyllasDaily Numbers & Trade Ideas $ 199.00

 

If clicking on the above link does not work please copy and paste the following in your browser:

 

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=D5MG7VPCUWW2N

 

Howard Tyllas

 

Put yourself in a position to make money, use the daily numbers service!

 

Email: dailynumbers@futuresflight.com
http://www.futuresflight.com/

 

Tel.1-312-573-2699, 1-312-823-9189

 

Disclaimer: No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are tempted. Futures trading involve risk.In no event should the content of this be construed as an express or implied romise, guarantee or implication by or from Howard Tyllas, that you will profit or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. No such promises, guarantees or implications are given. Past results are no indication of future performance.

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