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September 2012 Archive for Hedging Corn and Soybeans

RSS By: Howard Tyllas, AgWeb.com

Howard Tyllas is currently a member of the Chicago Board of Trade and registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission as a floor broker and as a Commodity Trading Advisor.

December 2012, 2013 Corn Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas 9/27/12

Sep 28, 2012

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This report was sent to subscribers on 9/26/12 3:40 p.m. Chicago time to be used for trading on 9/27/12.

December 2012 Corn

After the close recap on 9/27/12: My pivot acted as resistance and was 7.27, .00 1/4 from the actual high, and my support was 7.12 1/2, .00 3/4 from the actual low.

December 2013 Corn

After the close recap on 9/27/12: My pivot acted as resistance and was 6.22, .00 3/4 from the actual high, and my support was 6.01 1/2 FG, .05 1/4 from the actual low.

All charts and numbers for 9/28/12 have already been sent to subscribers at 3.30 pm .

December 2012 Corn

7.44 ¾
7.41 ½
-----------7.27 Pivot
7.12 ½
7.04 FG

5 day chart.... Down from last week same day
Daily chart ... Down
Weekly chart ... Up
Monthly chart .... Up 6.22 is the 200 DMA
ATR 17 ½ Ex. Oversold 3%


For 9/27/12: Bracket line above is resistance; bracket line below is support.

Downtrend line is the line in the sand for staying short, a close above the line the bulls regain control.

In my daily December 2012 corn numbers on Wednesday my pivot acted as resistance and was .01 ¾ from the actual high; my support was .04 ¾ from the actual low.

December 2013 Corn


6.37 ¾
6.30 ½
-----------6.22 Pivot
6.13 ½
6.01 ½ FG

5 day chart.... Down from last week same day
Daily chart ... Sideways
Weekly chart ... Up
Monthly chart .... Up 5.74 is the 200 DMA
ATR 11 ½ Ex. Oversold 2%

For 9/27/12: Newly drawn downtrend line is the line in the sand for staying short, a close above the line the bulls regain control. Gap at $6.01 ½ is support, and then the lows of July.

In my daily December 2013 Corn numbers on Wednesday my resistance was .01 ¼ from the actual high, my support was .04 ½ from the actual low.

9/27/12:

Grains: Downward spiral continues until support is found. The daily numbers and charts clearly point to where those support levels are. Never too late to hedge the 2013 crop or you can wait for the report which could produce a limit up or down move. I do not expect too much movement today, last chance to adjust your position before the report. Exports numbers today could be worth a reaction for a bias for the day.

Consider buying back some cheap calls or spreads today for a "what if" bet if the market can rally, so you are free to sell something else. The winner does not win and the loser gets killed, so buying far out of the money options could lose value even if the market closes up $.10. Do not expect a payoff unless the market can rally at least $.20, and then you need to sell a closer to the money call to make it worthwhile. Since most are long the $8 puts, you would need to buy back the $8.50 or higher calls and on a rally sell the $8.10 calls.

"I am still bearish longer term and prefer to take the sell signals, and risk $.05 in corn and $.07 in soybeans using a stop to protect any idea".

9/26/12: Grains: Corn is bleeding now with 4 days in a row of lower highs as it tries to hold support, but unless it can get above $7.60 lower prices is inevitable. 2013 corn needs to get above $6.46 in order to avoid the same fate. Friday should propel corn to its resistance numbers just mentioned, or clearly take out supports and head for the next support level. Very low volume this week does not help the bull case. More sideways to lower action should be seen until Friday.

Soybean bulls are looking at another week of lower prices, and the longer the bull is waiting for a corrective rally, the more trouble they are getting themselves into. Knowing we traded above $17.60 7 days ago would not comfort me if I was a bull, and I certainly would not have put myself into a position that could lose over $1.50 and not do something to end a losing trade. The only good news for the bull is that the market held the uptrend line support, but if that goes $15 is the next major support just above the gap at $14.74 ¾.

Time will tell how much supply was produced this year, and if we go over the fiscal cliff, or if the dollar gets really strong due to war like or worse conditions, or another economic meltdown like in 2008. Those are "what if's" that I respect and you should too, I would not be here writing to you if I did not avoid positions that can lead to losing everything. Like life insurance, I do not mind paying for security, because that takes away stress from the bigger picture, and as long as I am alive the money you make should more than pay for the insurance and then some. The alternative is that you are happy your spouse collected the insurance. Most would tell you that they would rather see you alive and pay the insurance. Locking in income and making even 50% of any move up makes more than sense to me than not hedging or not locking in what the market gave you, and the gamble is what the insurance (put protection) would have given you. The "what if" for the upside at this point in time is a shortfall much less than current expectations, but remember, 118 BPA or less was the guesstimate when corn was still deteriorating, and the high was $8.49, so use common sense and logic when it comes to your expectations for how high corn could rally and what it takes to get it back up there. I know some are calling for $10 corn still; I want to ask them what would it take to get it there?

This is the first year in my 5 years of service that I have been recommending hedging next year's crop before December's end. It is the price that attracts me to "lock in" something, and you know the things that could make it go up or down a few dollars from here. That is not an issue, what is relevant is the current price equates to a huge income with an average trend yield for your farm. You can "bake" in any upside and downside you want, (Subscribe Now!) I feel is a bargain for what you get. Expect to pay....

2013 soybeans should also be hedged for at least $1 protection, and... Subcribe Now!

I am still bearish longer term and prefer to take the sell signals, and risk $.05 in corn and $.07 in soybeans using a stop to protect any idea.

9/25/12: Grains: Corn chart is still pointing to lower prices after another "jab" below the support of $7.39 on Monday. 2013 corn is still in a sideways pattern at a support level. I am still in bear mode and would rather take the sell signals at resistance than the buy signals.

Soybeans tested the key uptrend line support of $15.87 and held. This is the support level we were looking at the bottom of my parameters.

I said everything there is to be said last week, and I am still bearish longer term, but nothing changed to alter my call for trading within the obvious chart parameters for now. I want to continue to day trade the numbers without bias today and risk now only $.05 in corn and $.07 in soybeans using a stop to protect.

Want to know what I think for tomorrow and going forward?

The markets now covered daily are Soybeans, Corn, and S&P's.

HowardTyllas Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas is designed to help you plan your trading strategies for the coming day.

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Howard Tyllas

Put yourself in a position to make money, use the daily numbers service!

Email: dailynumbers@futuresflight.com
http://www.futuresflight.com/

Tel.1-312-823-9189

Disclaimer: No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are tempted. Futures trading involve risk.In no event should the content of this be construed as an express or implied romise, guarantee or implication by or from Howard Tyllas, that you will profit or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. No such promises, guarantees or implications are given. Past results are no indication of future performance.


 

December 2012 Corn & December 2013 Corn Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas for 9/19/12

Sep 20, 2012

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Are you tired of listening to the same BULL ****, and services that do not have a plan if the market goes down instead? Hedge means to take risk off the table, and my service has all producers 100% hedged and they do have most of the upside unhedged (if we can rally for whatever reason). Hedge with a Pro and option expert who has been trading grains for 36 years.

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This report was sent to subscribers on 9/18/12 4:30 p.m. Chicago time to be used for trading on 9/19/12.

December 2012 Corn

After the close recap on 9/19/12: My resistance was 7.54, .00 3/4 from the actual high, and my pivot acted as support and was 7.40 1/2, .01 from the actual low.

December 2013 Corn

After the close recap on 9/19/12: My resistance was 6.42, .00 1/2 from the actual high, and my pivot acted as support and was 6.34, .02 (.01 in open outcry) from the actual low.

All charts and numbers for 9/20/12 have already been sent to subscribers at 3.30 pm .

December 2012 Corn


7.58 ½
7.54
-----------7.40 ½ Pivot
7.27 ¼
7.04 FG

5 day chart.... Down from last week same day
Daily chart ... Sideways
Weekly chart ... Up
Monthly chart .... Up 6.16 is the 200 DMA
ATR 18 ¾ Ex. Oversold 1%

For 9/19/12: Daily numbers is resistance; $7.40 ¼ is now pivotal, and the daily numbers are support.

Chart updated on part 2: Last bar on the right is the start on tonight's session.

In my daily December 2012 corn numbers on Tuesday my resistance was .04 ½ from the actual high; my support was .01 ¼ from the actual low.

December 2013 Corn

6.51
6.46
6.42
-----------6.34 Pivot
6.26
6.13 ½
6.01 ½ FG
5 day chart.... Down from last week same day
Daily chart ... Sideways
Weekly chart ... Up
Monthly chart .... Up 5.72 is the 200 DMA
ATR 10 ½ Ex. Oversold 7%


For 9/19/12: Daily numbers support and resist.

Chart update part 2: Last bar on the right is the start on tonight's session.

In my daily December 2013 Corn numbers on Tuesday my pivot acted as resistance and was .03 (only .01 in open outcry) from the actual high, my support was .00 ½ from the actual low.

9/19/12:

Grains: Corn filled the gap at $7.40 ¼ closing near there and is pivotal today. I looked at headlines on a site but did not read the stories, but the headlines where bearish. We are at our support, and if you are hearing bearish views from people, who were bullish until this week, look to buy something and risk a little on the idea. We have seen many $.95 breaks in corn after bullish reports (let alone the bearish one just posted) and so this $1.10 break down to our support is an opportunity to buy something. Do not get me wrong, I am still bearish, but I could see a correction up to $7.69 where I would take profits and look for a place to get short again. The bounce off of this gap might not get past my first resistance number, and I might be more willing to sell there than but here. If you are looking for a place to buy, here it is, but make sure you use a stop to protect the idea. If you are looking to sell, $7.54 to $7.58 ½ is the first place to do so, I would be more aggressive near $7.69.

It is a matter of the quick $.50 two day break down to our support of $7.40 ¼ keeps me from pressing the short side without some kind of bounce to sell it again. The same reason why the bulls could not take it past $8.49 without more confirmation is the reason I would not press the downside at this support.

Same goes for soybeans breaking $1.10 in two days but not down to a support yet, but in a congested area we traded in July and August. The market is up near my resistance number of $16.69 as I write and I have no problem taking a sell near there using a $.08 buy stop to protect. $17.02 I would be more aggressive to take the sell.

The world is a dangerous place, and they buy a lot of grain from us in the Middle East and Asia, and disruption in our shipments would be very bearish because you would have less supply actually being exported, and much more costly to do so. Soybeans should be sold in the next month or two because as I have talked about, November is $1 more than what you can get if you sell the late spring months. Funds still have a huge position, and my producers tell me they harvest the worst acres first, so better corn and soybean yields should be seen as the harvest progresses. I want to sell rallies; the only thing bullish is that the "brokers" want to sell it. USDA stocks report next Friday and then the October report should answer a lot of questions to what supply and demand could be, and will be enough for the market to get outside my current parameters.

I want to trade the numbers without bias today and risk $.06 in corn and $.08 in soybeans using a stop to protect.

9/18/12:

Grains: As the grain bulls learn that there is more to a market than unknown supply and demand numbers, we already know that all we need is a chart and a strategy that does not care what makes the pendulum swing, and we risk little to make more than what is being risked. My producers have learned that it is like deal or no deal, and it does not matter the $.40 they pay for locking in a $1 spread, it is the $.60 they know is no longer at risk and is "banked", that $1 of the total price is "game over".

I have said everything I could have the last few weeks to encourage locking in what the market gave you, and told farmer and speculator alike to not get caught up in emotions, not listen to any service or radio show that calls for $10 corn and $20 soybeans based on their guesstimates on damage to the crops, and instead let the chart be your guide to where support and resistance is, and be patient and wait for the pendulum to swing to a chart level to execute your trade idea, and make sure you have a stop or use a known risk strategy to limit a loss on any one trade idea.

I asked you if I was the only bear, and now I want to know when all those bulls decide that the market is going down more, so I can cover my shorts and get long. Being always wrong is as good as someone who is always right, and since they were so wrong about $10 and are still long risking more now than what they would have made, when they sell I want to buy, preferably at a chart support. I am serious when I say that, when the people who were talking about sky high prices will come, when they say sell, it should be close to a bottom even if it is just for a bounce before the next leg down.

Let's look at the charts now and review them once again. You know the December corn gap at $7.40 ¼ I consider longer term support, and I will continue to believe that until the market closes below there. If it does close below there a couple of days, you know I believe the next big support is at the bracket line and gap of $6.74 ½, and the resistance becomes $7.40. If the market does hold $7.40 ¼ then I would look for a retest of $7.69 and I would want to sell some upside and buy some downside with it, even if it only buys "at the money" $.20 or $.30 put spreads. Buyers should risk $.06 at a support, and producers can adjust calls like buying some short calls back if they are worth less than $.06, and if we rally sell calls once again but maybe a closer to the money strike making it worthwhile.

Soybeans closed below the low of the last 4 weeks, and at one time we traded $.07 below limit down, tonight we traded $.14 ½ below the limit down settle. Damage has been done, and the resistance levels are clear starting with $17, but support is yet to be determined by the market, but my chart levels are clear with the uptrend line near $15.80 being the first long term strong support, and worth the $.08 risk getting long.

Now that corn is at a support I would trade without bias today and risk $.06 in using a stop to protect any idea. Soybeans have not established support near here yet, so I would trade without bias but prefer to sell at $17, and risk $.08 using a stop to protect any idea. Interesting to note, November 2013 soybeans are up $.18 right now, November 2012 is down $.04. 2012 is about $3.20 over the 2013. December 2013 corn broke the uptrend line so I want to market some more 2013 corn. I did have a few who did some last week, I recommend selling any resistance number or especially when near the uptrend line near $6.55.

9/17/12:

Grains: November soybeans closed $.02 ½ higher for the week, December corn closed down $.17 ½ which at best reflected the friendly report for soybeans but negative for corn. Now that the report has been digested, soybeans and corn went nowhere outside my parameters that are still in force. Both bull and bear camp are awaiting further harvest reports before committing more money to their cause. This makes good sense, for months I have been telling you it is impossible to know what production is on 90 million acres in a year like this. My producers have all been surprised or even in shock by what production are coming from their fields. Every one of my producers is getting much more than they thought before combining. One told me he was expecting a yield of 140 BPA the day before he combined, it really came in at 182, he hedged it by buying the December $7.80/7.40 put spread and sold the December $8.10 call and collected $.08 for the 3 way spread.

Yield swings of 20 to 40 BPA from what was guessed by the farmers 24 hours before who best knows their fields, is a statistic I never thought possible. The implications is that the final verdict after all is harvested in the January report, we could easily have 500 million bushels more or less than what was expected, and since everyone is still bullish and expecting worse yields, the market is poised for a huge drawdown on much larger crop than what is expected and being "bet on". Yes, never look at what is inside your fence posts and think the rest of the world is like you, a trait that seems inherent in the farmers I have known for decades, so this year anything is possible including much lower yields and acres harvested. My bet would be on higher production than what is expected at this time.

This looks like the second year in a row that most or all of my producers will have either record or windfall profits. Crop insurance will be set next month, and producers with a shortfall in production will do just fine even if we are at $7.40 when it is set.

Most of my producers have around $8 locked in and have at least $1 or $2 protection to the downside right now, and they are long above there for the most part until $8.50 ....Subscribe now! Just as each person is in control of what they do, each has different upside potential, and protects what the market has given them depending on how bullish or bearish they are. What I remind them and speculators, when you are making money that is one thing, but when the amount gained is not protected and at risk of being lost, you should always reduce the risk to a level you are content losing on the gamble to pursue more. It is no longer the price of the grain; it is the risk in your position that comes with gains in a position not "closed" or have options to protect it. Maybe $10,000 is not worth protecting, but when it becomes $50,000 you would think that is too big a risk for a million dollar account on 1 idea.

If you have November 2012 soybeans coming out of the ground you should have a plan to market it by year's end. November/January spread is $.01 and worth keeping until then if you feel you have a basis play, but holding until March (.38 under January) makes no sense to me at all let alone holding to May ($1.18 under the January contract). If you sell the November you can buy an option spread such as the May $16.20/$17.20 call spread for $.33, but there is no need to buy anything if you are a producer, you are suppose to be selling what you grow, the rest is speculation.

December corn has a flat price and could be held into 2013, the risk is not buying enough put protection. You all know from previous years that you can make more money if the market goes up, and sometimes when it goes down too. You will start off buying SUBSCRIBE NOW and selling the.... As in 2012 it looks like you have until June to play that option game as you seek higher prices and a better basis. Always remember, if the market rallies it is always a good time to market your cash and lift your option strategy, but if the market comes down you most likely will need to wait for the market to get closer to expiration for the short call to lose all its premium, and the put spread gets to its intrinsic value (meaning sometimes we are below the put spread but it is not close to full value because of the time left).

There is only 6 weeks left before the November options expire, 10 weeks before the December options expire.

In regards to the 2013 hedge, I continue to recommend since we are at good price levels to lock in what should be a very good income, and if you are holding off that is your decision, but when the uptrend line breaks I would do something then.

Want to know what I think for tomorrow and going forward?

The markets now covered daily are Soybeans, Corn, and S&P's.

HowardTyllas Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas is designed to help you plan your trading strategies for the coming day, and for producers to help market your grains.

$199.00 USD for each month, renewable monthly

HowardTyllasDaily Numbers & Trade Ideas $ 199.00

If clicking on the above link does not work please copy and paste the following in your browser:

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Howard Tyllas

Put yourself in a position to make money, use the daily numbers service!

Email: dailynumbers@futuresflight.com
http://www.futuresflight.com/

Tel.1-312-823-9189

Disclaimer: No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are tempted. Futures trading involve risk.In no event should the content of this be construed as an express or implied romise, guarantee or implication by or from Howard Tyllas, that you will profit or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. No such promises, guarantees or implications are given. Past results are no indication of future performance.


 

November Soybeans Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas for 9/13/12

Sep 14, 2012

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Are you tired of listening to the same BULL ****, and services that do not have a plan if the market goes down instead? Hedge means to take risk off the table, and my service has all producers 100% hedged and they do have most of the upside unhedged (if we can rally for whatever reason). Hedge with a Pro and option expert who has been trading grains for 36 years.

Want to know

Sign up: Free 1 Day Trail of Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas

This report was sent to subscribers on 9/12/12 3:30 p.m. Chicago time to be used for trading on 9/13/12.

November Soybeans

After the close recap on 9/13/12: My pivot acted as resistance and was $17.50 the EXACT actual high, and my support was 17.30 1/4, .02 1/2 from the actual low.

All charts and numbers for 8/14/12 have already been sent to subscribers at 4.00 pm.

November Soybeans


17.89 All Time High
17.69 ¾
-----------17.50 Pivot
17.30 ¼
16.21 Uptrend Line Support
16.93 ¾
5 day chart... Down from last week same day
Daily chart .... Up
Weekly chart ... Up
Monthly chart ....Up 13.70 is the 200 DMA
ATR 35 Balanced 55%

 

For 9/13/12: 2012 high resists, the daily numbers support.

In my daily November soybean numbers on Wednesday my resistance was .02 from the actual high, my support was .12 ½ from the actual low.


9/13/12:

Grains: "I am more concerned how the market acts to a report than the report itself", and the markets did act according to what the USDA implied, bullish beans bearish corn. Price action was more than interesting before and just after the report release, market running $.10 up and down in a few seconds, and evoked emotional trading. When you have price orders with stops working prior to the report, and if the numbers are good, it is like catching fish in a bucket.

Soybeans traded $.07 higher and corn a few cents lower 30 minutes after the report, and it looked like the soybean market was being held down by corn, and corn looked like it might be dragged higher by soybeans. That is what the price action was telling me, but I only listen to one thing, my NUMBERS. Corn went to my resistance number first, and then back down to my support within 10 minutes, and then rallied to my pivot. Soybeans went from my first resistance to below the pivot and then went $.02 from my second resistance. Price orders before the report and using stops, just taking the buys if I am bullish, taking the sells if I am bearish, and having a buy order using a sell stop to protect also having an order to sell and have a buy stop if I am without bias. In these cases you might have been filled on both your buy order and sell order and needed only to cancel the stops.

Now that we have some FRESH numbers to work with, the production is still unknown but the report deflates the bulls yield hopes significantly even if further reductions are made, and so the market has no choice but to trade technically like it or not. Soybeans posted a big day and look set to make a new high, but I look at it as soybeans are only up a few cents on the week and need to make new all time highs before I get off of my predictions that "the highs are in for the year". Corn is easy to say that now, soybeans though I might be the only one. If I am wrong I will be stopped out, if the market comes down $1 though, what is the bull's plan to exit?

Once again you see what I am talking about when I say that I do not like to be on the same side of a fund and speculative position when their positions are huge, because I know when they liquidate it goes the other way "big time". Now December corn settled $.80 below the high, and $.30 from my gap support of $7.40 ¼, $6.75 would be the next strong support. So what is the bull's plan now? They all easily recommended buying corn looking for $10, but have they sold out yet or still hold their position like the funds, holding a position with other people's money, and do they have a plan on selling it? This is bearish to me, because if the market goes higher they will exit probably near $8.40 and feel lucky, or they will need to sell it somewhere on the way down.

Soybeans are probably sucking in the "Johnny come lately" longs, and I cannot see it going higher but at least I know my producers will be more than happy if it continues higher. The all time high of $17.89 is resistance until broken, and a correction of a $1 or two is not out of the question.

As my plans for day trading also hold true for longer term, I wanted to play the short side but would be a willing buyer at significant supports. $7.40 ¼ gap is that support. Now that the options sold are worth much less than when sold, some should be bought back on breaks or continued to decay for one reason if no other, so if the market can rally for whatever reason you can sell it again.

Take a look at the options, the December corn at the money $7.80 calls settled down $.07 ½ and the $7.80 put closed up $.00 ¾ showing you again what I have always said "the winner does not win and the loser gets killed".

My bias is still bearish but would trade the numbers today without bias especially when at extreme numbers, and risk $.06 in corn and $.08 in soybeans using a stop to protect.

9/12/12:

Grains: The markets backed off to supports before the reports, and the most a bear could expect before the report. It makes sense to me and I always point out, that usually markets like to be at a comfortable price between what was recent supports and resistances and not overly committed to one side. Reason being if a bullish report is expected and we are trading near the high of the year going into the report, if the report comes in bullish it might already be priced into the market and the market experiences "buy the rumor sell the fact" if the report did not bring more buyers willing to take it higher. But if the report is bearish the market high price sure has a big way to fall to find support. Being bullish at a chart support going into a report is not like being bullish at an historic high.

Common sense and logic has a major role in all aspects of my approach, mindset, risk management, strategies and plans. Execution takes discipline and self control. Form your own that fits your personality, your time to participate, and your idea of risk and reward. Use what I do as a foundation to build or improve what you are already doing, even if it means to not do some of the things that are blocking your success, such as losing too much money on a trade idea, trading just to trade (you want action), or trading when emotional.

Having a plan at all times even if it means to do nothing is a must; otherwise you could be like a bull without a plan right now. Let's say the bull got long at $7 and then again at $8.49, he is now long 2 with an average price of $7.74 ½ looking to sell at a psychological mark of $10. That's a plan, but adding to winners like that usually looks good on paper but it does not compute in my common sense and logic part of my mind and so I abandoned that concept in my first year. Both day and overnight trade, it does not work for me. I do not like to add to my entry as the market moves my way, I like to take profits and maybe let a few contracts try and go past the number by using a 5 minute bar chart to assist in that decision.

Trouble with the above bull is he is not making any money, has twice the risk now as when he first entered at $7, and he needs to have a line in the sand to end losses from getting out of control. Never be out of control. I would have bought 2 at the initial entry and sold one somewhere in my pursuit of higher prices, and have a risk using the charts for that, and as long as I am going after more than what I am risking, I can stay in the trade. Having 1 contract after taking a profit REDUCES risk and controls emotions, the other way increases risk and at a higher price. That is how my mindset has looked at this since my first year of trading. This is what works for me and my personality, and applied in my approach.

Option winners will not win today, and the losers will get killed, especially if the market goes down. We open at 7:20am and the report is out at 7:30am, I will take calls at 7am.

Since the corn and soybean market is near pivotal supports, my bias is still bearish but would trade the numbers today without bias especially when at extreme numbers, and risk $.06 in corn and $.08 in soybeans using a stop to protect.

9/11/12:

Grains: Need to go back to 7/26/12 to find a lower close than Monday in corn. Now December corn is about $.40 away from the downtrend line resistance at $8.23, and $.40 away from the gap support at $7.40 ¼. It has a 50/50% chance of going either way, but my bias continues to be bearish due to the huge fund positions, and historic high prices being unsustainable with current guesstimates of production. November soybeans are still in bull mode above $17 but if that uptrend line goes, the bears take over.

Most of my producers have $7.90 or $8 locked in and protected down to $6 or lower. They do not have any stress or concern even if the market crashes. They would like it to rally though, because all have upside of some kind and will make more money if the market can get above $8 once again. My producers look around them and see farmers who bought call spreads to "own" their crop again, or have not sold some crop yet, worried about not only this report, but every day after too until some kind of hedge is made. My producers traded that mentality in for my strategy that allows each producer to be in control and able to execute their thoughts, while having some protection that not only reduces risk but stress too as they pursue higher prices.

Am I the only bear out here? That is what I like when at a chart resistance, the risk is small but the rewards are big if the "other side" wants to reduce their position.

About once a year I remind everyone as I inform new subscribers to things that contributed to my trading approach, and as rules such as gaps, or trend lines are constantly repeated all year long. The reason being is that as a trader you must never let it go through one ear and out the other, rules are not made to be broken but could be changed if "reason" warrants it. My rules have been with me for decades and not yet able to find reason to change. I DID NOT learn from people who were successful, they would not talk to me about trading, I learned from the losers! I was on the trade floor for 3 years before I bought my membership and not only did I observe the winners which were helpful up to a point, but it was the losers who clearly were easy to know what they did wrong that were disasters. I learned what not to do. I learned to do the opposite of them such as risk little to make a lot, they lost more than they were willing to make. I learned that talking about "why the report is wrong" as you are losing money is not the right thing to do, that's what losers do, as they had no plan if the market would go against them.

Today is the last day to adjust before the report, and my producers have not called me that last several days so they look pretty content with their positions. Only thing I can think of for producers with long $8 put spreads and short the $8.50/$9.50 call spread is to... SUBSCRIBE NOW!

I want to trade without bias today and risk $.06 in corn and $.08 on soybeans using a stop to protect any idea.

Want to know what I think for tomorrow and going forward?

The markets now covered daily are Soybeans, Corn, and S&P's.

HowardTyllas Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas is designed to help you plan your trading strategies for the coming day.

$199.00 USD for each month, renewable monthly

HowardTyllasDaily Numbers & Trade Ideas $ 199.00

If clicking on the above link does not work please copy and paste the following in your browser:

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Howard Tyllas

Put yourself in a position to make money, use the daily numbers service!

Email: dailynumbers@futuresflight.com
http://www.futuresflight.com/

Tel.1-312-823-9189

Disclaimer: No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are tempted. Futures trading involve risk.In no event should the content of this be construed as an express or implied romise, guarantee or implication by or from Howard Tyllas, that you will profit or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. No such promises, guarantees or implications are given. Past results are no indication of future performance.

WASDE Report for 9/12/12

Sep 12, 2012

Sign up: Free Learn a better way to hedge for farmers

Are you tired of listening to the same BULL ****, and services that do not have a plan if the market goes down instead? Hedge means to take risk off the table, and my service has all producers 100% hedged and they do have most of the upside unhedged (if we can rally for whatever reason). Hedge with a Pro and option expert who has been trading grains for 36 years.

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WASDE Report for 9/12/12

WHEAT: The 2012/13 U.S. wheat balance sheet is unchanged this month; however, small by-class adjustments are made to projected exports and stocks. Projected exports for Hard Red Winter wheat are lowered 25 million bushels with Hard Red Spring and White wheat exports raised 15 million bushels and 10 million bushels, respectively. Corresponding changes are made to projected ending stocks for these three classes. The projected range for the 2012/13 season-average farm price is lowered to $7.50 to $8.70 per bushel compared with $7.60 to $9.00 per bushel last month. Prices reported for the summer months, when producers typically market nearly half the crop, have remained well below cash bids and futures prices, suggesting substantial forward pricing by producers earlier in the year.

Global wheat supplies for 2012/13 are projected 3.1 million tons lower mostly due to lower expected production in Russia. An increase in foreign beginning stocks partly offsets the projected 4.1-million-ton reduction in world wheat output. Beginning stocks are raised for Canada and Egypt, but lowered for Argentina. Production for Russia is reduced 4.0 million tons with lower reported area and reduced yields as harvest results confirm additional drought and heat damage to both the winter and spring wheat crops. Production is also lowered 0.5 million tons for adjoining Kazakhstan, which experienced the same adverse drought and heat during July and August that affected spring wheat in the central and eastern growing regions of Russia. EU-27 production is lowered 0.5 million tons mostly reflecting lower expected yields in the United Kingdom. Ukraine production is raised 0.5 million tons based on higher reported yields. Production for Afghanistan is raised 0.4 million tons mostly on higher reported area.

Global wheat consumption for 2012/13 is lowered 2.6 million tons mostly on lower wheat feed and residual use in Russia and Kazakhstan. Food use is also lowered slightly for both countries with additional reductions projected for food use in Egypt and Nigeria. Food use is raised for Afghanistan, Iran, and Libya.

Global wheat trade for 2012/13 is lowered slightly this month with imports reduced for China, Egypt, EU-27, Israel, and Nigeria. Import increases for Turkey and Iran limit the global decline in trade. Exports are reduced 2.0 million tons for Ukraine based on the recent agreement between government officials and grain traders to limit shipments because of concerns about tightening domestic supplies. Higher expected exports for Brazil, EU-27, and Turkey mostly make up for the Ukraine reduction.

World ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected 0.5 million tons lower with changes to a number of countries. The largest declines in stocks are for Russia, EU-27, China, Brazil, and Argentina. The largest increases are for Ukraine, Canada, Iran, and Turkey.

COARSE GRAINS: U.S. feed grain supplies for 2012/13 are projected higher this month with a reduction in forecast corn production more than offset by higher projected corn carryin. U.S. corn production is lowered 52 million bushels with the national average yield forecast 0.6 bushels per acre lower at 122.8 bushels. Lower yields and production in the Corn Belt and Central Plains are partly offset by increases elsewhere, particularly across the South where an early harvest is boosting available supplies.

U.S. corn supplies for 2012/13 are projected 108 million bushels higher as an increase in expected beginning stocks more than offsets lower production this month. Exports for 2011/12 are lowered 10 million bushels reflecting the slowing pace of shipments during August. Feed and residual use for 2011/12 is lowered 150 million bushels based on the record level of crop maturity and harvest progress as of September 1. State-level crop progress reports indicate that nearly 11 percent of the 2012 corn crop was harvested before the September 1 start of the 2012/13 marketing year. Based on state-by-state production forecasts from the September 12 Crop Production report, nearly 1.2 billion bushels of new-crop corn are estimated to have been available for use before the end of the old-crop 2011/12 marketing year. This is up more than 700 million bushels from a year ago. Early new-crop corn use is expected to displace use of 2011 old-crop corn and boost old-crop inventories on September 1. As a result, early new-crop usage reduces the feed and residual calculation in the balance sheet. (For a more complete discussion see Westcott and Norton, Implications of an Early Corn Crop Harvest for Feed and Residual Use Estimates, FDS-12F-01, Economic Research Service, USDA, July 2012, www.ers.usda.gov/media/828975/fds12f01.pdf .)

Total U.S. corn use for 2012/13 is raised this month with higher expected feed and residual disappearance more than offsetting lower projected exports. Feed and residual disappearance is projected 75 million bushels higher, in part reflecting higher expected September-December disappearance with the expected rise in early new-crop usage during the 2011/12 marketing year. Exports for 2012/13 are projected 50 million bushels lower with increased competition from lower-priced South American supplies. Ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected 83 million bushels higher at 733 million. The projected range for the corn season-average farm price is lowered 30 cents on both ends of the range to $7.20 to $8.60 per bushel.

Global coarse grain supplies for 2012/13 are projected 4.0 million tons lower despite higher beginning stocks of corn in the United States and barley in Canada. Reduced corn production prospects for EU-27, Serbia, and Canada add to the decline in the United States to reduce world corn output 8.0 million tons. Higher barley production for EU-27 and Canada mostly offset reductions in oats, barley, rye, and millet production in Russia. Corn production is lowered 4.4 million tons for EU-27 with yield reductions for France, Italy, Romania, and Hungary as extended drought and heat in August further reduced production prospects across southern Europe. Serbia production is also lowered 1.2 million tons reflecting the same adverse weather conditions. Canada corn production is lowered 1.1 million tons based on the latest survey results from Statistics Canada.

Global 2012/13 corn exports are lowered 1.8 million tons this month with the largest reduction for the United States. Corn exports are also lowered for Serbia and EU-27. Partly offsetting these reductions is a 1.0-million-ton increase for Brazil exports. Lower barley exports from Russia are more than offset with increases for Canada, Ukraine, and EU-27. Foreign coarse grain consumption is lowered mostly on lower corn usage. Corn feeding is lowered 4.0 million tons for the EU-27, 1.0 million tons for Canada, and 0.4 million tons for Serbia. Corn feeding is raised 0.8 million tons for Egypt. Barley feeding is raised 1.0 million tons for EU-27, 0.9 million tons for Canada, and 0.2 million tons for Iran. Barley feeding is lowered 0.5 million tons for Ukraine, and 0.2 million tons for Russia. Global corn ending stocks are projected 0.6 million tons higher with the increase for the United States partly offset by a reduction for Brazil.

RICE: U.S. 2012/13 rice supplies are increased 12.4 million cwt or 5 percent because of increases in beginning stocks and production. U.S. rice production in 2012/13 is forecast at 196.3 million cwt, up 6.3 million from last month due to both an increase in harvested area and yield. Harvested area is estimated at 2.68 million acres, up 37,000 acres. The average yield is estimated at a record 7,334 pounds per acre, up 138 pounds per acre from last month, with large increases in Arkansas and Mississippi. Long-grain rice production is forecast at 138.3 million cwt, up 6.2 million from last month. Combined medium- and short-grain production is forecast at 58.1 million cwt, up slightly from a month ago. All rice beginning stocks for 2012/13 are raised 7.6 million cwt from last month to 41.1 million (rough-equivalent basis) based on USDA's Rice Stocks report released on August 27. The import projection is lowered 1.5 million cwt to 19.5 million, all in long-grain, as the increase in production and stocks will reduce imports.

Domestic use and exports are raised for 2012/13. Domestic and residual use is increased 2.0 million cwt to 126.0 million, largely because of a substantial increase in supplies, particularly for long-grain rice. All rice exports for 2012/13 are projected at 100.0 million cwt, up 8.0 million cwt from last month, all in long-grain rice. Larger supplies, particularly for long-grain rice, will likely pressure prices and make U.S. rice more competitive. All rice ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected at 30.9 million cwt, up 2.4 million from last month, but down 10.2 million from 2011/12.

The long-grain season-average farm price range is projected at $12.50 to $13.50 per cwt, down $1.00 per cwt on both ends of the range from last month compared to $13.40 per cwt for 2011/12. The combined medium- and short-grain farm price range is projected at $16.50 to $17.50 per cwt, up $1.00 per cwt on each end of the range from last month compared to a revised $16.50 per cwt for 2011/12. The 2012/13 all rice season-average farm price is forecast at $13.70 to $14.70 per cwt, down 40 cents per cwt on each end of the range from last month compared to a revised $14.30 per cwt for 2011/12. Larger supplies of long-grain rice will pressure prices and tighter supplies of combined medium- and short-grain rice will support prices.

Projected global 2012/13 rice supplies are raised more than the increase in use, resulting in a net increase in ending stocks from a month ago. Beginning stocks are raised 0.7 million due mostly to increases for Indonesia, Brazil, and the United States. Global rice production is projected at a near record 464.2 million tons, up 1.0 million tons from last month, primarily due to larger expected crops in China, the Philippines, EU-27, and the United States. China's 2012/13 rice crop is increased 1.0 million tons to a record 143.0 million, as harvested area and average yield are raised. Global consumption is raised 1.3 million tons from a month ago to a record 467.7 million tons due to increases for China, the Philippines, and a number of smaller changes for other countries. Global exports are raised from a month ago largely due to an increase in the United States, which is partially offset by a decrease for Burma. Global ending stocks for 2012/13 are projected at 102.2 million tons, up 0.4 million from last month, but down 3.5 million from the previous year. Stocks are raised for Brazil, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, and the United States, and lowered for Sri Lanka and Pakistan.

OILSEEDS: U.S. oilseed production for 2012/13 is projected at 82 million tons, down 1.4 million from last month. Lower soybean and cottonseed production is only partly offset by an increase for peanuts. Soybean supplies for 2012/13 are reduced due to lower forecast production and beginning stocks. Soybean production is projected at 2.634 billion bushels, down 58 million due to lower yields in the Midwest. Soybean exports are reduced 55 million bushels to 1.055 billion mainly due to reduced supplies. Soybean crush is reduced 15 million bushels to 1.5 billion, the lowest since 1996/97. The reduction reflects lower projected soybean meal exports and domestic soybean meal consumption. Although soybean ending stocks are projected unchanged at 115 million bushels, they would fall to a 9-year low. Other changes for 2012/13 include reduced soybean oil production and ending stocks.

Soybean crush for 2011/12 is increased 15 million bushels to 1.705 billion reflecting higher-than-expected crush reported for July. Soybean exports are increased 10 million to 1.36 billion. Residual use is lowered 10 million bushels reflecting the impact of early harvest of the 2012/13 crop in the South. Ending stocks are projected at 130 million bushels, down 15 million from last month. Other changes for 2011/12 include increased soybean oil production, exports, and ending stocks and increased domestic disappearance of soybean meal.

The U.S. season-average soybean price for 2012/13 is projected unchanged at $15.00 to $17.00 per bushel. Soybean meal prices are projected at $485 to $515 per short ton, up $25.00 on both ends of the range. Soybean oil prices are projected at 54 to 58 cents per pound, up 1 cent on both ends of the range.

Global oilseed production for 2012/13 is projected at 453.1 million tons, down 4.2 million from last month. Reductions for soybeans, sunflowerseed, and rapeseed are only partly offset by increased peanut and cottonseed production. In addition to the United States, projected soybean production is reduced for Ukraine and Canada. Early harvest results for Ukraine indicate a lower yield in part reflecting unusually hot temperatures during the growing season. Lower soybean production for Canada is based on the most recent crop survey results reported by Statistics Canada. Rapeseed production for Canada is reduced 0.9 million tons to 15.4 million based on lower yields and harvested area reported by Statistics Canada. At this level the crop is record large. Rapeseed production is also raised for the 2011 crop based on the latest Statistics Canada estimates.

Other changes include higher rapeseed production for EU-27, lower sunflowerseed production for Russia, Ukraine, and EU-27, and lower cottonseed production for Brazil.

SUGAR: Projected U.S. sugar supply for fiscal year 2012/13 is decreased 36,000 short tons, raw value, compared with last month, as lower carryin stocks more than offset increased imports. Lower total imports in 2011/12, reflecting pace-to-date estimates, reduce that year's ending stocks by 141,000 tons. Imports for 2012/13 are increased to reflect the announced refined sugar tariff rate quota. For Mexico, higher 2012/13 carryin stocks offset lower projected production reflecting lower-than-expected government estimates of sugarcane harvest area.

LIVESTOCK, POULTRY, AND DAIRY: The forecasts for 2012 and 2013 red meat and poultry production are reduced from last month as lower expected pork and poultry production more than offsets a higher beef production forecast. Beef production is raised in 2012 as higher fed beef and cow slaughter is forecast. The 2013 forecast is raised as higher forecast placements in second-half 2012 will result in larger fed cattle supplies in the first part of 2013. The pork production forecast for 2012 is reduced due to a slightly slower expected pace of slaughter in the third quarter and slightly lower carcass weights in the second half of the year. Pork production is reduced for 2013 as carcass weights are tempered. USDA will release the Quarterly Hogs and Pigs report on September 28, providing an indication of producer farrowing intentions into early 2013. Broiler production is reduced in both 2012 and 2013 as producer returns are expected to be pressured by higher soybean meal prices. Turkey production is raised fractionally for 2012, but the forecast for 2013 is reduced as soybean meal prices are forecast higher. Egg production is forecast lower for both 2012 and 2013 as hatching egg production is expected to reflect reduced demand from the broiler sector.

Beef imports are reduced for 2012 based on the current pace of imports, but are unchanged for 2013. Beef exports are unchanged for 2012, but the forecast for 2013 is lowered as supplies will remain relatively tight and tighter poultry supplies are expected to support domestic demand. Pork exports are reduced for both years on weaker expected demand from Asia. Poultry export forecasts are unchanged for both 2012 and 2013.

Cattle prices for 2012 are raised from last month on stronger second-half demand, but the forecast for 2013 is unchanged despite higher forecast production as demand remains relatively strong. Pork prices for 2012 are forecast lower, largely reflecting current prices, but prices for 2013 are unchanged from last month. Broiler price forecasts are raised for both years as supplies are lower. Turkey and egg prices are forecast lower for 2012, reflecting current prices; forecasts for 2013 are unchanged.

The 2012 milk production forecast is reduced slightly from last month, reflecting a slower rate of growth in milk per cow in the second half of the year. The production forecast for 2013 is unchanged from last month. Skim-solids imports are raised, but the export forecast is unchanged.

Product prices are forecast higher for 2012 as the milk production forecast is reduced and demand is somewhat stronger. With higher product prices, both the Class III and Class IV price forecasts are raised. For 2013, the butter price forecast is reduced slightly on weaker expected demand but forecasts for other products are unchanged. Thus, the Class II price forecast is unchanged but the Class IV price is lowered. The all milk price is forecast at $17.80 to $18.00 per cwt for 2012 and $17.85 to $18.85 per cwt for 2013.

COTTON: The 2012/13 U.S. cotton supply and demand estimates include slightly lower production and exports, resulting in lower ending stocks compared with last month. Beginning stocks are raised marginally, reflecting a revision to estimated U.S. 2011/12 ending stocks. The 2012/13 production estimate is reduced 3 percent, due mainly to lower estimated production for Texas and Mississippi, partially offset by increases for the Southeast. Domestic mill use is unchanged from last month, but exports are slightly lower due both to lower U.S. production and a reduction in total world imports. Ending stocks are now estimated at 5.3 million bales, equivalent to 35 percent of total use. The forecast range of 62 to 78 cents per pound for the marketing-year average price received by producers is narrowed 1 cent on each end.

An increase of nearly 2 million bales in world 2012/13 ending stocks is mainly attributable to sharply higher beginning stocks. Prior year adjustments for China, India, and Australia account for most of the increase in beginning stocks. For China, higher-than-expected 2011/12 imports and lower consumption are raising stocks by 1.3 million bales. For India, changes to the 2010/11 and 2011/12 balance sheets mainly reflect revisions published recently by India's Cotton Advisory Board and raise stocks by 400,000 bales. World 2012/13 ending stocks are now projected at 76.5 million bales, including a revision to the India residual. Projected world stocks include 35.5 million bales for China.

World 2012/13 production is lowered 82,000 bales from last month, as increases for India and the African Franc Zone are more than offset by reductions for Brazil and the United States. World consumption and imports are reduced 600,000 bales, as lower demand by China is partially offset by increases for Pakistan and others; exports are reduced for Australia, India, and the United States. The decrease in China's consumption is consistent with the 2011/12 reduction. China's consumption is expected to fall 2.5 percent from last season due to the government's price support, reserve, and stock policies.

Want to know what I think for tomorrow and going forward?

The markets now covered daily are Soybeans,Corn, and S&P

My numbers usually are sent at least 12 hours (via your email) in advance of the next day open outcry session. Subscribers use them as best suited to their own needs and sometimes that involves the overnight trade.

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HowardTyllas Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas cover markets for less than $10 a day.

HowardTyllas Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas is designed to help you plan your trading strategies for the coming day.

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Howard Tyllas

Put yourself in a position to make money, use the daily numbers service!

Email: dailynumbers@futuresflight.com
http://www.futuresflight.com/

Tel.1-312-823-9189

Disclaimer: No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are tempted. Futures trading involve risk.In no event should the content of this be construed as an express or implied romise, guarantee or implication by or from Howard Tyllas, that you will profit or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. No such promises, guarantees or implications are given. Past results are no indication of future performance.

November Soybeans Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas for 9/7/12

Sep 09, 2012

Sign up: Free Learn a better way to hedge for farmers

Are you tired of listening to the same BULL ****, and services that do not have a plan if the market goes down instead? Hedge means to take risk off the table, and my service has all producers 100% hedged and they do have most of the upside unhedged (if we can rally for whatever reason). Hedge with a Pro and option expert who has been trading grains for 36 years.

Want to know

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This report was sent to subscribers on 9/6/12 3:30 p.m. Chicago time to be used for trading on 9/7/12.

November Soybeans

After the close recap on 9/7/12: My pivot acted as resistance and was 17.52 1/2, .00 1/2 from the actual high, and my support was 17.25 1/4, .01 from the actual low.

All charts and numbers for 9/10/12 have already been sent to subscribers at 7:30 pm.

November Soybeans

17.94 ¾ All Time High
17.89 2012 Contract High
17.69 ¾
-----------17.52 ½ Pivot
17.35 ¼
17.25 ¼
17.16 ½ Use the same numbers as used on 9/6/12
5 day chart... Down from last week same day
Daily chart .... Up
Weekly chart ... Up
Monthly chart ....Up 13.58 is the 200 DMA
ATR 34 Balanced 52%

For 9/7/12: I still say "Last week's low is support near the uptrend line, this week's high resists".

In my daily November soybean numbers on Thursday my pivot acted as resistance and was .01 ¼ from the actual high, my support was .00 ¼ (EXACT in open outcry) from the actual low.

9/7/12:

Grains: Not too much to say that I have not already said, and my thinking we are going to trade sideways in the parameters I outlined have held to be true. Informa comes out today and after today that will have been factored into the last trade price. My focus is on the report, not the guesses what the report will say.

I still say "Unless I see numbers that justify new highs, I want to sell resistances, but will be a willing buyer at significant supports. I want to risk $.06 in corn and $.08 on soybeans using a stop to protect any idea".

9/6/12:

Grains: Soybeans started the week making an all time high, and a day later we have closed lower for the week. Key support is the uptrend line that comes in at $17, and a close below there spells trouble for the bulls. FC Stone came out with numbers after the close and their corn guess is 121.4 BPA with production of 10.607 billion bushels. Soybeans were pegged at 36.7 BPA with production of 2.739 billion bushels.

Corn had its worst close in 3 weeks, and it looks like it is trying to hang around $8 going into the report that the bulls hope will take it higher. My producers continue to hear calls for $10 corn and $20 soybeans from media outlets, brokers, "research firms", and other bulls, and this always troubles me when perspectives are one sided. Even if they get it right and there is less production, which does not guarantee higher prices unless the shortfall is significant. Also, nothing stops the market from going down significantly before the market starts the next leg up, and what bull wants to lose $1 or more and defend their trade idea. In January 1980 I traded gold on the exchange floor in the trading pit when it went to a high of $850, and then it went and traded below $300 an ounce for a few years in the 1990's. It was not until recent years that it came back to $850 before more than doubling that price. What grain bull wants to wait 2 or 3 months in corrective mode before we start to claw back their own money, and maybe need to wait until next year? Not a trader! Maybe an investor, but even investors need a line in the sand, because without some sort of risk protection, you will be only 1 idea away from bankruptcy.

You have until Tuesday to adjust your position before the report on Wednesday, to allow for a limit move either way. Use the time to... SUBSCRIBE NOW!

I called for the highs to be in now, and corn has not made a new high, but soybeans have. I certainly continue that opinion for corn, and I would also say the same for soybeans too even with the record high this week. Unless I see numbers that justify new highs, I want to sell resistances, but will be a willing buyer at significant supports. I want to risk $.06 in corn and $.08 on soybeans using a stop to protect any idea.

9/5/12:

Grains: Grains continue to sell off before the close giving up a big chunk of gains, which is one reason I prefer to take the sell signals for day trades. Soybeans keep making new highs which is a sign rationing might still be taking place; corn has already accomplished that with its sideways pattern. Corn is indeed on hold until more information on production is known, but I view the chart and fundamentals as having more risk to the downside versus more gains to the upside. $8.40 proved to be strong resistance and I would need a new high over $8.49 in order for me to get bullish, I would rather get bullish at a chart support as $7.40 or $6.75.

FC Stone comes out with numbers on Wednesday and Informa on Friday, and hopefully they will push the market to a support or resistance level worth risking $.06 in corn and $.08 in soybeans. Report is on the 12th not on Monday the 10th, so you have a couple of extra days to adjust your position going into that report.

1 producer started his 2013 hedge buying the December 2013 ... (Subscribe now!) I really like the spread and think it is cheap considering what you get.

I continue to prefer taking the sell signals but would day trade without bias and risk $.06 in corn and $.08 in soybeans.

Want to know what I think for tomorrow and going forward?

The markets covered daily are Soybeans, Corn, and S&P's.

HowardTyllas Daily Numbers & Trade Ideas is designed to help you plan your trading strategies for the coming day.

$199.00 USD for each month, renewable monthly

HowardTyllasDaily Numbers & Trade Ideas $ 199.00

 

Howard Tyllas

Put yourself in a position to make money, use the daily numbers service!

Email: dailynumbers@futuresflight.com
http://www.futuresflight.com/

Tel. 1-312-823-9189

Disclaimer: No guarantee of any kind is implied or possible where projections of future conditions are tempted. Futures trading involve risk.In no event should the content of this be construed as an express or implied romise, guarantee or implication by or from Howard Tyllas, that you will profit or that losses can or will be limited in any manner whatsoever. No such promises, guarantees or implications are given. Past results are no indication of future performance.


 

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