Additional Crop Comments From Small Grains Summary

September 30, 2011 04:08 AM
 

Following are highlights from the Small Grains Summary:

Crop Comments


Oats: The 2011 production is estimated at a record low 54.0 million bushels, 
down 6 percent from the August forecast and down 33 percent from 2010. Yield 
is estimated at 57.5 bushels per acre, down 4.1 bushels from August and down 
6.8 bushels from the previous year. Area planted to oats is estimated at a 
record low 2.50 million acres, down 4 percent from the previous estimate and 
down 20 percent from 2010. In total, record lows for planted acres were set 
in 24 States. Harvested area is estimated at a record low 940 thousand acres, 
up slightly from August but 26 percent below last year. Record lows for 
harvested area occurred in 19 States.

Favorable growing conditions in the Southeast promoted significant yield 
increases compared with 2010, with Alabama and North Carolina yields tying 
record highs. Extreme drought conditions in Texas led to a large decline in 
yield from last year. Elsewhere, delayed planting caused by above average 
spring precipitation and combined with excessive heat during pollination in 
July led to a large drop in average yields in Minnesota and South Dakota.

During early spring, planting of the oat crop was behind the normal pace. By 
April 24, growers had planted 41 percent of the acreage, 18 points behind 
normal. During April, emergence also was behind the normal pace. By April 24, 
emergence was 31 percent complete, 5 points behind the 5-year average. As of 
May 29, planting was 89 percent complete, 10 points behind the average. 
Seventy-four percent of the crop was emerged by May 29, nineteen points 
behind the normal pace. Through June, crop development remained behind normal 
in most major oat-producing States. As of June 26, fifty-two percent of the 
oat acreage was headed, 19 points behind the 5-year average. However, Texas 
was on pace with the 5-year average.

By July 31, thirty percent of the oat acreage was harvested, 14 points behind 
the normal pace. However, harvest in Iowa, Nebraska, and Texas was ahead of 
the 5-year average. Although harvest was 94 percent complete in the nine 
major producing States by September 4, only 64 percent of the crop was 
harvested in North Dakota, 24 points behind the average.

Barley: Production is estimated at 155 million bushels, down 8 percent from 
the August forecast and 14 percent below 2010, and the lowest since 1936. 
Average yield per acre, at 69.2 bushels, is down 3.9 bushels from the 
previous year. Producers seeded 2.56 million acres in 2011, down 11 percent 
from last year. This is the lowest planted acreage on record. Harvested area, 
at 2.24 million acres, is down 9 percent from 2010, and the lowest level 
since 1881.

Seeded area in North Dakota establishes a record low for the State, while 
harvested area is the lowest since 1901. In addition, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Oregon, South Dakota, and Utah producers set new record lows for seeded 
acreage, while producers in New York seeded a record-tying low. Record lows 
for harvested area were set in Michigan and Wisconsin. A record high yield 
was set in North Carolina, while producers in Arizona reported a record-tying 
yield.

Barley seeding was underway across much of the major producing regions by 
April 17, when 11 percent of the Nation's crop was in the ground, 
8 percentage points behind last year and 5 percentage points behind the 
5-year average. Rain, snow, and unusually cool spring temperatures delayed 
the start of fieldwork in North Dakota by nearly 3 weeks when compared to 
normal. Emergence was evident in most States by May 1, but cool temperatures 
limited crop growth. With producers in North Dakota battling soggy fields 
well into June, Nationwide seeding progress remained well behind normal 
throughout the month. Warmer temperatures in portions of the barley-producing 
region promoted rapid crop emergence during the first half of June, with 
heading evident in Idaho, Minnesota, and Washington by July 3. The latter 
half of July brought warmer temperatures to much of the Northern Tier, 
promoting an increase in crop development and maturity. As August began, 
producers in Idaho, Minnesota, and North Dakota were harvesting this year's 
crop; however, progress in four of the five major estimating States was 
20 percentage points or more behind the 5-year average. Harvest advanced 
quickly throughout the month as producers in Idaho, Minnesota, Montana, and 
North Dakota ramped up fieldwork to help gain ground on what was a slower 
than normal crop year. By September 4, seventy-one percent of the Nation's 
barley crop was harvested, 10 percentage points behind normal. A warm, dry 
weather pattern dominated much of the West during September, allowing harvest 
progress to advance ahead of both last year and the average by September 25, 
when 97 percent of the crop was out of the field.

  Winter wheat: The 2011 winter wheat production totaled 1.49 billion bushels, 
down slightly from the August forecast but 1 percent above the previous year. 
The United States yield is 46.2 bushels per acre, down 0.1 bushel from August 
and down 0.6 bushel from 2010. Area harvested for grain is estimated at 
32.3 million acres, up slightly from August and up 2 percent from the 
previous year.

Planted and harvested acres were down from 2010 in most of the major Hard Red 
Winter (HRW) growing States. Persistently hot, dry conditions in this growing 
area, particularly in Texas and Oklahoma, resulted in acreage and yield 
reductions from the previous year in most States. Nationally, HRW production 
totaled 780 million bushels, down 23 percent from 2010.

After seeing a reduction in 2010 area due to wet weather during planting, 
planted and harvested acres increased from a year ago across most of the Soft 
Red Winter (SRW) growing area. Due to excellent weather conditions through 
much of the season, production was up significantly from the previous year, 
with production in many of the SRW States up more than 100 percent from 2010. 
Record high yields were experienced in Alabama, Louisiana, Michigan, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. 
Overall, SRW production totaled 458 million bushels, up 93 percent from 2010.

White winter production totaled 256 million bushels, up 12 percent from the 
previous year. Planted and harvested acreage in the Pacific Northwest (Idaho, 
Oregon, and Washington) was above 2010's level. Record high yields were 
experienced in Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.

Other spring wheat: Production for 2011 is estimated at 462 million bushels, 
down 11 percent from the August forecast and down 25 percent from 2010. 
Harvested area totaled 12.1 million acres, down 2 percent from August and 
down 10 percent from last year. The United States yield is 38.3 bushels per 
acre, down 4.2 bushels from August and 7.8 bushels lower than last year. 
Yields are below the previous year's level in all States except Idaho, 
Oregon, and Washington, where record high yields were achieved in all three 
States. 

Due to wet spring conditions, planting got off to a slow start in most of the 
major spring wheat-producing States. As of April 24, six percent of the crop 
had been planted, 19 points behind the 5-year average. The excessively wet 
conditions lingered into early summer and eventually reduced the total acres 
available for planting in North Dakota and Montana. By May 29, only 
68 percent of the Nation's crop had been planted, 27 points behind the normal 
pace. Crop maturation continued behind normal throughout the growing season 
for most States. As a result, harvest progress lagged behind the 5-year 
average. By September 4, sixty-eight percent of the crop had been harvested, 
13 points behind the 5-year average. However, warm, dry weather in early 
September promoted a rapid harvest pace, and by September 11, 
ninety-eight percent of the crop had been harvested, only1 percent behind the 
5-year average.


Durum wheat: Production for 2011 is estimated at 51.9 million bushels, down 
9 percent from the August forecast and down 51 percent from 2010. Grain area 
harvested is 1.32 million acres, down 2 percent from August and down 
48 percent from the previous year. The United States yield is 39.3 bushels 
per acre, down 3.1 bushels from August and down 2.8 bushels from 2010 but 
still the third highest yield on record, trailing only 2009 and 2010. 

Flooding and excessively wet conditions during spring and early summer 
reduced area available for planting in Montana and North Dakota and hampered 
crop development throughout the growing season. In North Dakota, planted and 
harvested acres are record lows. As of September 25, harvest progress in 
Montana and North Dakota was behind normal. Most notably, Montana was 
10 points behind the 5-year average.

Rye: Production for 2011 is estimated at 6.33 million bushels, down 
15 percent from last year and the second lowest production on record. 
Harvested area totaled a record low 242,000 acres, down 23,000 acres from 
2010. The United States yield, at 26.1 bushels per acre, is down 1.9 bushels 
from the previous year. Drought conditions in the Southern Great Plains and 
floods in the Northern Great Plains throughout the growing season led to 
yield decreases from a year earlier.


 

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