AgDay Daily Recap -August 25, 2017

August 25, 2017 02:57 AM
 
AgDay

TODAY ON AGDAY
AUGUST 25, 2017


HEADLINES
A HURRICANE HEADS FOR THE COAST OF TEXAS.  "USDA CROP PROGRESS REPORT SAYS MINNESOTA CORN AND SOYBEAN  CONDITIONS RATE HIGHER THAN THE I STATES. COULD THE STATE PRODUCE A  BUMPER CROP?  IN AGRIBUSINESS....TAX TIPS??? "THE ADVICE I'M GIVING OUR FARMERS IS ALMOST 'DO NOTHING.' AND  REMEMBERING A MAJOR STORM FROM 25 YEARS AGO. AGDAY - PRESENTED BY CHEVY SILVERADO. HIGH-STRENGTH STEEL FOR HIGH-STRENGTH DEPENDABILITY.

HURRICANE HARVEY
GOOD MORNING I'M CLINTON GRIFFITHS. IT'S BEEN 142 MONTHS SINCE A MAJOR HURRICANE STRUCK THE CONTINENTAL  UNITED STATES. THIS MORNING...THE TEXAS GULF COAST IS BRACING FOR A DIRECT STRIKE FROM  HARVEY. THE U.S. NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER SAYS HARVEY IS LIKELY TO INTENSIFY AS  IT MOVES OVER THE WARM WATERS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, AND DELIVER  HEAVY RAIN TO PARTS OF EASTERN TEXAS, LOUISIANA AND MISSISSIPPI. RAIN ACCUMULATIONS OF 10 TO 15 INCHES ARE EXPECTED OVER THE MIDDLE  AND UPPER TEXAS COAST AND SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA THROUGH NEXT  TUESDAY.  SOME PLACES COULD SEE EVEN MORE--UP TO 25 OR 30 INCHES OF RAIN. FRANCISCO SANCHEZ, HARRIS CO. OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: "OUR BIGGEST CONCERN RIGHT NOW IS THAT THIS IS NOT YOUR TYPICAL TYPE OF STORM, AND IT'S NOT GOING  TO BE YOUR TYPICAL TYPE OF FLOOD EVENT. FOR MOST STORMS THE PROBLEM IS WIND AND STORM SURGE.  WHILE THOSE COULD BE PROBLEMS HERE, THE BIGGEST RISK/ISSUE IS THIS GOING TO BE A BIG FLOODING  EVENT."THE LAST MAJOR HURRICANE TO HIT THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES WAS  HURRICANE WILMA, WHICH STRUCK FLORIDA ON OCT. 24, 2005.  PRIOR TO THE CURRENT 142-MONTH STRETCH WITHOUT A MAJOR HURRICANE  STRIKE IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S., THE LONGEST PERIOD WAS THE 96 MONTHS  BETWEEN SEPTEMBER 1860 AND AUGUST 1869. COTTON FARMERS IN TEXAS A RUSHING TO GET AS MUCH OF THE CROP  HARVESTED AS THEY CAN AHEAD OF THE STORM. ONE FARMER TELLING OUR PARTNERS AT AGWEB--THEY ESTIMATE ROUGHLY 50  PERCENT OF THE CROP IN THAT REGION IS LEFT IN THE FIELD AND 90 PERCENT  OF THAT IS READY TO HARVEST. THE THREAT TO COTTON HAS FUTURES RALLYING...SOME CONTRACTS CLIMBING  MORE THAN FIFTY CENTS THURSDAY. HEAVY RAINS ARE LIKELY TO HURT QUALITY LONG TERM. USDA METEOROLOGIST BRAD RIPPEY SAYS IT'S BEEN AN ACTIVE SEASON. "SO WE HAVE HAD A VERY ACTIVE START OR ONLY BEEN THREE YEARS THAT HAVE HAD  SIMILAR ACTIVE STARTS WITH THIS MANY NAMED STORMS BY THE MIDDLE PART OF AUGUST. AND EACH OF  THOSE THREE ENDED UP BEING EXTREMELY ACTIVE YEARS ALL THE WAY THROUGH. "> RIPPEY SAYS ANY TIME THERE'S AN ACTIVE TROPICAL PATTERN IN THE ATLANTIC  OFF THE COAST OF AFRICA, LIKE THIS SEASON, HE'S WATCHING  STEERING  CURRENTS TO SEE IF THEY'LL PUSH TROPICAL STORMS INTO THE GULF.

DROUGHT MONITOR
SPEAKING OF RAIN, HEAVY RAINS IN THE UPPER MIDWEST HELPING BLUNT LONG  TERM DROUGHT.  THE LATEST DROUGHT MONITOR SHOWING IMPROVEMENTS THIS WEEK  ESPECIALLY IN THE DAKOTA'S, NEBRASKA AND WESTERN IOWA. FORTY-FOUR PERCENT OF IOWA NOW CLASSIFIED AS DROUGHT-FREE.  LAST WEEK IT WAS JUST 29 PERCENT.  NEBRASKA ALSO SEEING IMPROVEMENTS...FOLLOWING RAINFALL TOTALS OF  MORE THAN FIVE INCHES IN EASTERN NEBRASKA. HOWEVER, DROUGHT CONDITIONS INTENSIFIED IN MONTANA.  NINETY-ONE PERCENT OF THE STATE IS NOW IN SOME LEVEL OF DROUGHT. 

CROP TOUR WESTERN LEG
COVERAGE OF THE 2017 FARM JOURNAL MIDWEST CROP TOUR, IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY DUPONT  PIONEER. WITH YOU FROM THE WORD GO. THE 2017 MIDWEST CROP TOUR IS NOW IN THE BOOKS...AS THE AG INDUSTRY  ANXIOUSLY AWAITS THE FINAL NATIONAL YIELD NUMBERS FROM OUR PARTNERS  AT PRO FARMER. WE HAVE THE FULL RESULTS FROM TOUR SCOUTS IN ILLINOIS.  THIS YEAR TEAMS REPORT AN OVERALL AVERAGE CORN YIELD OF 180 BUSHELS  TO THE ACRE.  THAT'S DOWN  COMPARED TO LAST YEAR. AND OFF 7 BUSHELS FROM THE THREE  YEAR AVERAGE. SOYBEANS CAME IN LOWER AS WELL AT 1230...NEARLY 40 PODS LOWER THAN THE  THREE YEAR AVERAGE. IN MONDAY'S CROP PROGRESS REPORT USDA ESTIMATES 82 PERCENT OF THE  STATE'S CORN CONDITION AND 74 PERCENT OF THE SOYBEAN CROP IS RATED  GOOD TO EXCELLENT. BOTH RATINGS ARE HIGHER THAN EACH OF THE THREE 'I'  STATES. BETSY JIBBEN FINDS OUT IF MINNESOTA'S CROP MAY BE THIS YEAR'S 'GARDEN  SPOT.' SOME MINNESOTA FARMERS, HAVE IT PRETTY GOOD THIS YEAR. JUNE WAS GREAT, JULY, WE HAD GOOD POLLINATION, GOOD WEATHER FOR THAT. ABOUT THE RIGHT TEMPERATURE. JULY IN OUR AREA, WE HAD EXCESSIVE RAIN. MINNESOTA LAKE FARMER,  KEN ECKHARDT SAYS FOR HIM, THOSE RAINS DIDN’T COME ALL AT ONCE.SOME CROPS ON WETTER GROUND ARE STARTING TO STRUGGLE A LITTLE BIT. WE NEED HEAT AND WE NEED SUNSHINE. 24AND FARMERS LIKE ECKHARDT WILL TELL YOU- IT’S NOT A  SECRET THE STATE HAS THE POTENTIAL PRODUCE A GOOD CROP. YES, IT’S DOING VERY WELL. I DON’T THINK IT WILL BE A CROP LIKE WE HAD LAST YEAR, BUT IT’S GOING TO BE VERY CLOSE. IT’S GOING TO BE A BUMPER CROP. YES, IT IS. 21 ND SCOUTS ON THE TOUR SAY THEY SEE THAT GOOD CROP TOO WHEN IT COMES TO CORN. "OUR ROUTE HAS BEEN STRONG ON CORN." JUDISCH’S ROUTE TOOK HIM THROUGH MARTIN AND WON-TIN-TON COUNTIES. <COUNTY OR COUNTIES?> HE SAYS THERE WASN’T TOO MUCH VARIABILITY IN CORN..AND EVEN FIELDS WITH ISSUES…"IT’S THE WORST LODGING HE’S EVER SEEN." STILL SAMPLE A NICE YIELD. "WE’VE BEEN RUNNING FROM 181 TO 201 WHICH IS  GOOD FOR MINNESOTA, USDA WAS 183." BUT BEANS ARE DIFFERENT.”NORMALLY THIS PART OF MINNESOTA, WE’LL  SEE AT LEAST A THOUSAND PODS. 11, 12 HUNDRED PODS. OUT OF THE THREE THIS YEAR, 852 HAS BEEN THE HIGH. THAT’S 30 PERCENT LESS THAN WE EXPECT TO SEE." JUDISCH SAYS THAT’S DUE TO LACK OF BEANS ON THE PLANT AND POPULATION. "WE SHOULD HAVE 5 AND 6 BEAN CLUSTERS AND THEN  IN THIS PLANT WE ONLY HAVE 26 ONE THREE BEAN CLUSTER, EVERYTHING ELSE ARE 2 BEAN CLUSTERS> ONE SCOUT SAYING HE’S SEEING DRIFT IN ONE SAMPLE, WHICH BROUGHT THE POD COUNT DOWN. ”THIS IS THE MOST DAMAGED BY THE DICAMBA, THAT’S HARDLY AFFECTED DOWN THERE,”DESPITE A VERY PROMSING CROP, FARMERS LIKE ECKHARDT KNOW A FROST COULD QUICKLY CHANGE IT."THESE ARE MATURING NICELY AS FAR AS MATURITY GOES, WE’RE MOVING ALONG. I THINK IF WE AVOID AN EARLY FROST, WE WILL BE FINE." "OUR CROP IS BEHIND WITH THE COOL WEATHER, 01 AN EARLY FROST WOULD REALLY HURT US, YES IT WOULD."MINNESOTA FARMERS HOPE ONE OF THE ONLY AREAS OF THE MIDWEST WHICH RECEIVED GOOD WEATHER THIS YEAR…WILL CONTINUE TO SEE IT INTO HARVEST.REPORTING IN SOUTCENTRAL  MINNESOTA, I’M BETSY JIBBEN. THANKS BETSY. 

CROP TOUR EASTERN LEG
AS THE THE DROUGHT MONITOR SHOWED US, MOISTURE  CONDITIONS IMPROVED THIS WEEK IN PARTS OF THE WESTERN CORNBELT. BUT  THE MOISTURE MAY HAVE COME TOO LATE TO HELP IOWA'S CORN CROP. TYNE MORGAN HAS DETAILS FROM THE ROAD. CLINTON, WE KNOW PARTS OF IOWA ARE DRY. AND WHILE MOST OF THE STATE COULD REALLY USE A RAIN RIGHT NOW, IN THE EAST PART OF THE STATE, FARMERS ARE SURVIVING THE ROLLERCOASTER OF MOTHER NATURE BETTER THAN THE WEST. THESE BEANS WERE ACTUALLY PLANTED JUNE 3 FOR WEST LIBERTY IOWA FARMER AUSTIN MAAS…WE'RE PODDED REALLY WELL HERE. WE'RE GETTING SOME GOOD POD FILL. SOYBEANS ARE SHOWING STRONG PROMISE THIS YEAR..WE GOT A GOOD POD COUNT HERE. WE'D DEFINITELY LIKE TO SEE A LITTLE MORE RAIN TO FILL THESE TOP PODS OUT. DESPITE DRY CONDITIONS PARKED ACROSS IOWA, THESE FIELDS ARE TURNING OUT GOOD CROPS THIS YEAR. WE'RE SITTING REALLY GOOD. I FEEL WE'RE IN A GARDEN SPOT. HE SAYS RAINS IN JULY REPLENISHED THE SOIL, MEANING THEY'VE BEEN ABLE TO HANDLE THE RECENT DRYNESS BETTER THAN SOME. BUT YOU DON'T HAVE TO TRAVEL FAR TO RUN INTO TROUBLE SPOTS. YOU'RE LOOKING ABOUT 30 TO 35 MILES SOUTHWEST OF HERE IS WHERE SOME PROBLEMS START AND OF COURSE WHEN YOU GET SOUTH OF HERE THERE'S LIGHTER SOIL PROFILES AND THEY'RE HURTING IF IT'S NOT UNDER IRRIGATION MAAS ESCAPED THE WORST OF IT THIS YEAR, BUT EVEN THIS GARDEN SPOT OF IOWA WE'VE GOT GOOD KERNEL LENGTH, GOOD KERNEL DEPTH. DOESN'T LOOK TO PRODUCE RECORD YIELDS THIS YEAR.OOOH. NICE! BUT JUST WEST OF IOWA, CITY… WOW. BEANS ARE BOUNTIFUL…"THAT'S A BUSH MAN" WITH POD COUNTS CATCHING PROFARMER'S BRIAN GRETE BY SURPRISE."IT'S HEAVILY PODDED I MEAN LOOK HOW THICK THE STEM IS THE PODDING. THAT'S INCREDIBLE."BUT INCREDIBLE BEANS WASN'T THE CASE IN EVERY FIELD."REALLY IT'S THE NUMBER OF PODS. DID THEY GET THE MOSIURE AT THE RIGHT TIME. THOSE THAT DID, WE GET GOOD POD COUNTS OUT OF THOSE THAT DIDN'T THE POD COUNTS ARE DISAPPOINTING." AND EVEN WITH LIGHT RAINS ON THURSDAY, THESE FIELDS NEED MORE MOISTURE TO FILL OUT AND FINISH STRONG.IT'S CORN SHOWING SCARS OF DRYNESS…CAN'T EVENSUPPORT THE WEIGHT OF THE ROPE IMPACTING GRAIN LENGTH…THIS FIELD IS TIP BACK HERE, A GOOD 2.5 INCHES OR SO. AND YIELD. MY BIGGEST SURPRISE IS THAT WE HAVEN'T HAD ANY REALLY HIGH YIELDING FIELDS. WHICH MEANS IOWA'S CROP IS GOOD… BUT NOT A BIN BUSTER. I WOULD SAY JUST IN GENERAL IT'S NOT THE CROP THE PRODUCER WANTED WHEN THEY GOT THE SEED IN THE GROUND. LSAT YEARS CROP WAS HUGE BOTH ON CORN AND SOYBEANS, I THINK WE'RE SHORT OF THAT AND USDA TOLD US THAT WITH THEIR AUGUST ESTIMATE. NOW CLINTON, GRETE SAYS THE MATURITY OF THE CROP IS BETTER THAN HE SAW IN OHIO, BUT AN EARLY FORST OR POSSIBLY A NORMAL FROST, COULD FORCE THESE CROPS TO SHUT DOWN EARLY THIS YEAR, IN TURN, IMPACTING FINAL YIELD. REPORTING FROM IOWA, I'M TYNE MOREGAN FOR AGDAY.

CROP COMMENTS
MIKE HOFFMAN HAS HIS SURVEY OF CROPS--IN THIS MORNING'S CROP  COMMENTS.GOOD MORNING. GOOD MORNING CLINTON. WE TALKED ABOUT DROUGHT IMPROVEMENT IN IOWA AND NEBRASKA, BUT  ILLINOIS WAS DOWNGRADED SOMEWHAT. THE DROUGHT MONITOR SHOWS SIX PERCENT OF ILLINOIS IS NOW IN D-1 OR  MODERATE DROUGHT. IT WAS JUST ONE PERCENT LAST WEEK. AND THE AREA OF ILLINOIS UNDER ABNORMAL DRYNESS ALSO EXPANDED THIS  WEEK...AS THE SCOUTS ON CROP TOUR CAN ATTEST TO. ILLINOIS HAS BEEN OUT OF DROUGHT MOST OF THE GROWING SEASON. AND NOW SOME HOMETOWN TEMPS.

TEASE
DUPONT PIONEER IS AUCTIONING OFF A TIMPTE® SUPER HOPPER GRAIN TRAILER AND ALL PROCEEDS  WILL BENEFIT THE FFA.CAN CONGRESS GET TOGETHER ON TAX REFORM YET THIS YEAR. WE HAVE A TAX  EXPERT UP NEXT WITH SOME IDEAS ON WHAT TO WATCH AND HOW TO PREPARE. AND WE REVISIT A STORM THAT'S STILL CREATING BAD MEMORIES....25 YEARS  LATER.JOIN MARKET RALLY HOST CHIP FLORY LIVE FROM THE RABO AGRIFINANCE BOOTH AT THIS YEAR'S  FARM PROGRESS SHOW, AUGUST 29TH THROUGH 31ST.

AGRIBUSINESS
PAUL NEIFER IS OUR GUEST HERE THAT AGRIBUSINESS DESK TODAY A PRINCIPAL  WITH CLIFTON LARSON ALLEN AND A TAX EXPERT. OF COURSE TAX IS ALWAYS AN  IMPORTANT TOPIC AND WHENEVER YOU'RE RUNNING A BUSINESS LET'S TALK  ABOUT WHAT WE SHOULD BE DOING RIGHT NOW THIS TIME OF YEAR AND THROW  IN SOME OF THE POSSIBLE REFORMS THAT WE MAY BE EXPERIENCING. THIS  YEAR. YOU KNOW WE KNOW RIGHT NOW THERE'S THERE'S A BIG SIX IN D.C. THERE'S A  COUPLE FROM THE HOUSE COUPLE FROM THE SENATE A COUPLE FROM  PRESIDENT TRUMP THAT ARE TRYING TO MELD ALL THESE COMPETING TAX  REFORM IDEAS TOGETHER. AND LIKELY WE'RE GOING TO HAVE SOMETHING. IT'S  GOING TO BE SEPTEMBER OCTOBER THIS YEAR COULD GO ALL THE WAY TO THE  END OF THE YEAR IF IT DOESN'T HAPPEN BY THE END OF THIS YEAR IT'S  PROBABLY NOT GOING TO HAPPEN BECAUSE THERE'S A MIDTERM ELECTION  NEXT YEAR. AND SO TO SOME DEGREE THE ANSWER WE'RE GIVING OUR  FARMERS WHAT THEY SHOULD DO NOW IS ALMOST NOTHING. YOU KNOW IT'S IT'S  A CASE OF UNTIL WE REALLY KNOW EXACTLY WHAT CONGRESS IS GOING TO DO  IT'S HARD TO MAKE THOSE BIG DECISIONS THAT'S WHY HOPEFULLY WE GET  SOMETHING HERE FAIRLY SOON WHAT WE CAN TELL OUR FARMERS WE KNOW  THAT SECTION 179 IS STILL THERE AT THE $510,000 LEVEL. OK. WE KNOW THAT  BONUS DEPRECIATION IS THERE. SO IF THEY'RE BUILDING A NEW BUILDING OF  ANY TYPE ANY FARM PROPERTY AUTOMATICALLY QUALIFIES FOR A 50 PERCENT  DEDUCTION IN THE YEAR THAT THEY BUILD IT. SO. SO THAT'S ALWAYS NICE. SO  THOSE THINGS ARE THERE ALL OF OUR OTHER SORT OF ARROWS IN OUR TAX  QUIVER SO TO SPEAK. THEY'RE ALL STILL AVAILABLE. FARMERS CAN DEFER THEIR  CASH SALE AND IN NEXT YEAR. SO THAT ALLOWS THEM IF THEY WANT TO REPORT  THE INCOME THIS YEAR THEY CAN OR THEY CAN REPORT IT NEXT YEAR.  NORMALLY THEY WOULD REPORT IT NEXT YEAR. SO I THINK TAX POLICY IS SORT  OF LIKE MAKING SAUSAGE. YOU KNOW WHEN WE GET THE FINAL PRODUCT WE'RE MAYBE OK WITH IT. BUT AS  FAR AS HOW IT'S MADE IT'S JUST A MISMATCH OF BACK AND FORTH AMONG ALL  THOSE PARTIES. BUT I THINK THE KEY FOR FARMERS IS BE TALKING TO THEIR  ADVISORS COME UP WITH SOME PLANS THAT IF THIS PART OF TAX REFORM  HAPPENS THEN WE WANT TO GO THIS WAY IF THIS PART OF TAX REFORM  HAPPENS THEN WE WANT TO GO THE OTHER WAY. ALL RIGHT SO THOSE ARE SOME THINGS THAT WE KIND OF BE THINKING AHEAD  HERE AND BE PREPARED BECAUSE MORE THAN LIKELY IT'S GOING TO HAPPEN AT  THE WORST POSSIBLE TIME. YEAH WE CAN GO BACK THREE YEARS AGO IT HAPPENED ON BASICALLY THE  LAST DAY OF THE YEAR AND SIGNED JANUARY 2ND OF THE FOLLOWING YEAR. SO  IT COULD IT COULD CONCEIVABLY GO ALL THE WAY TILL THE END OF THE YEAR. ALL RIGHT SOMETHING TO WATCH. ALL RIGHT APPRECIATE IT. THANK YOU.

WEATHER
WELCOME BACK TO AG DAY HERE WITH METEOROLOGIST MIKE HOFFMAN AND MIKE AS WE LOOK AT THE  DROUGHT MONITOR HERE THERE'S A COUPLE OF SPOTS WHERE WE SAW IMPROVEMENT BUT OVERALL THE  NORTHERN PLAINS STILL PRETTY DRY LONG TERM. YEAH IT REALLY IS ESPECIALLY LONG TERM AND BACK INTO  EASTERN PORTIONS OF MONTANA. BUT WHEN YOU JUST TAKE A LOOK AT THE LOWER 48 AS A WHOLE THERE  THAT'S VERY LITTLE DROUGHT FOR A TYPICAL YEAR YOU CAN STILL SEE THOSE AREAS IN IOWA AND LIKE WE  SAID THE NORTHERN PLAINS AND EASTERN MONTANA. WHEN YOU LOOK AT THE EASTERN CORN BELT THE  SOUTHEAST THE SOUTHERN PLAINS. LITTLE IF ANY DROUGHT ANYWHERE ACROSS THAT AREA GOING BACK FOR  WEEKS AND PROGRESSING EASTWARD YOU CAN SEE WE HAVE SEEN SOME IMPROVEMENT LIKE WE  TALKED ABOUT IN NEBRASKA AND EVEN SOUTH DAKOTA BUT WE'VE SEEN BIG TIME IMPROVEMENT.  MUCH OF OKLAHOMA NORTHERN TEXAS THOSE AREAS HAVE CONTINUED TO IMPROVE AS WE MOVE  THROUGH THE LAST THREE TO FOUR WEEKS. AND THAT IS WHERE WE ARE RIGHT NOW. AGAIN JUST NOT A  MAJOR AREA. BUT OBVIOUSLY IF YOU LIVE IN ONE OF THOSE AREAS IT'S NOT PLEASANT. ALL RIGHT.  HURRICANE HARVEY COMING ONSHORE NOW. OUR COMPUTER MODEL HAS COME FARTHER NORTH THAN IT  WAS YESTERDAY BUT IT'S STILL FARTHER SOUTH THAN THE NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER. BUT THE NATIONAL  HURRICANE FORECAST HAS COME MUCH FARTHER SOUTHEAST SO WE'RE GOING TO SEE I THINK IT'S GOING  TO BE SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS THAT GETS THE BULK OF THE RAIN OUT OF THIS SYSTEM AND HERE'S THE  WHOLE PROBLEM AS THIS COMES INLAND IT LOOKS LIKE THERE'S JUST NO STEERING CURRENTS WHICH  MEANS WHEREVER IT COMES IN IT'S GOING TO GO IN A COUPLE OF COUNTIES AND INSTALL AND THAT COULD  BE TERRIBLE BECAUSE SOME AREAS COULD JUST GET A COUPLE OF FEET OF RAIN OR MORE. SOMETHING  WE'LL HAVE TO WATCH. ALSO A PRETTY GOOD AREA OF LOW PRESSURE MOVING ACROSS FLORIDA. OTHER  THAN THAT NOT A WHOLE LOT GOING ON. WE DO HAVE THIS SLOW MOVING SYSTEM IN THE NORTHERN  PLAINS PRODUCING SOME AREAS OF SHOWERS AND STORMS. OTHERWISE BIG DOME OF HIGH PRESSURE  OR GREAT LAKES IN THE NORTHEAST KEEPING THINGS ON THE COOL SIDE. SO LET'S CHECK THE  PRECIPITATION ESTIMATE. PAST 24 HOURS YOU CAN SEE SOME DECENT AMOUNTS IN PARTS OF NEW  MEXICO TOO. AND AS WE BRING HARVEY IN OUR COMPUTER MODEL IS SHOWING OVER A FOOT OF RAIN  AND OBVIOUSLY THAT COULD DOUBLE THAT OVER A 48 HOUR OR FOUR OR FIVE DAY PERIOD LET'S SAY  SOUTHERN FLORIDA ALSO GETTING A WHOLE BUNCH OF MOISTURE. HIGH TEMPERATURES TODAY ONLY 60S  ACROSS THE GREAT LAKES IN THE NORTHEAST 60S AND 70S. LET'S SAY THE REAL HOT HUMID STUFF HAS  ALL THE WAY DOWN TO THE GULF COAST LOWS TONIGHT IN THE 40S AND 50S IN THE GREAT LAKES AND  THE NORTHEAST. HIGHS TOMORROW MORE OF THE SAME. LOTS OF 60S AND 70S SHOWING UP IN THAT  AREA. THAT'S ALL BECAUSE OF THAT TROUGH THAT'S MOVING THROUGH THE NORTHEAST. SEE HOW THINGS  RELAX A LITTLE BIT BUT WE STILL HAVE THIS TROUGHING THIS OVER THE GREAT LAKES AND THE NORTHEAST  AND THE RIDGE OUT WEST. THINGS MAY START TO CHANGE A LITTLE BIT AS WE HEAD INTO LATER NEXT  WEEK TOWARD THE LABOR DAY WEEKEND. THAT'S A LOOK ACROSS THE COUNTRY NOW. TAKE A LOOK AT  SOME LOCAL FORECASTS FIRST OF ALL SHERIDAN IN WYOMING A MIXTURE OF CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.  THUNDER SHOWERS POSSIBLE IN SPOTS HIGH OF 87. ROCKDALE TEXAS CLOUDY AND HUMID AND  AFTERNOON RAIN AND WIND SETTING IN HIGH OF 89 IN SPRINGFIELD OHIO LOTS OF SUNSHINE. HIGH  AROUND 73. 

TEASE
YOU PLANTED THE SEEDS, BUT IS IT GOING TO MAKE ANY GRAIN. WE'LL DO STAND COUNTS WITH MISSY BAUER NEXT ON FARM JOURNAL COLLEGE  TV. PLUS AS TEXAS PREPARES FOR A MASSIVE STORM, WE REMEMBER A  MONSTROUS STORM THAT STILL STIRS VIOLENT MEMORIES MORE THAN TWO  DECADES LATER.

FARM JOURNAL COLLEGE TV
FARM JOURNAL COLLEGE TV FIELD AGRONOMIST MISSY BAUER JOINS US TO  EXPLAIN HOW TO KNOW IF YOU'RE HITTING MARK AHEAD OF HARVEST. WELCOME BACK TO THE FARM JOURNAL COLLEGE FIELD AGRONOMIST MISSY  BAUER LOOKS LIKE SHE'S BUSY. MISSY WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO HERE. WELL WHAT WE'RE TRYING TO DO HERE IS SOME OF OUR PREHARVEST  SCOUTING. SO ONE OF THE BIG THINGS WE WANT TO DO IS GET AN IDEA OF  WHERE IS OUR EAR COUNT ACTUALLY END UP HERE. BEFORE HARVEST NOT THAT  WE CHANGE ANYTHING FOR THIS YEAR BUT IT'S REALLY TO HELP ME MAKE  BETTER DECISIONS FOR NEXT YEAR. OK SO YOU'RE JUST TRYING TO GET A HANDLE ON WHAT'S OUT HERE. HOW DID  WE DO. I NOTICE YOU'RE COUNTING EARS. YOU'RE JUST TRYING TO FIGURE OUT  YIELDS RIGHT. WELL PART OF WHAT I'M AFTER IS HOW MANY PLANTS PER ACRE DO I HAVE  COMPARED TO EAR'S PER ACRE. OK SO WHAT'S MY LOSS BETWEEN PLANT  COUNT AND YOUR COUNT EVERY THOUSAND EARS PER ACRE IS WORTH FIVE TO  SEVEN BUSHEL. ALL RIGHT. SO IN THIS CASE HERE YOU KNOW I'VE LOST AN  ENTIRE EAR HERE WHERE THERE'S NO EAR BUT THERE'S A PLANT. SURE. SO IN MY THOUSANDS OF AN ACRE I HAVE MARKED OUT HERE I JUST LOST FIVE  TO SEVEN BUSHEL WITH THIS PLANT ACTING'S WAY. WHEN YOU COMPARE TO  ACROSSED HERE'S ANOTHER REAL SMALL EAR HERE BECAUSE IT'S A DOUBLE  DROP WITH TWO PLANTS SPACE TO CLOSE TOGETHER AN ISSUE HERE WITH THE  PLANTS ITSELF. YEAH. AND YOU WOULD COUNT LET'S SAY WE HAVE EARS THAT LOOK LIKE THIS. YOU COULD WOULD COUNT BOTH OF THESE RIGHT. YEAH I GUESS WHAT YOU  THINK ABOUT YOU KNOW WHAT DO WE REALLY MEAN BY EAR COUNT. SURE. BOTH  OF THESE ARE OUR EARS THAT ARE GOING TO GET HARVESTED BUT WHEN YOU  LOOK AT THE INDIVIDUAL PLANT YIELD HERE THIS EAR IS MUCH LARGER THAN  WHAT I HAVE HERE BECAUSE I ME THE SAME AMOUNT TO PRODUCE ON A PLANT  THIS YEAR IT DID THIS YEAR. SO I REALLY WANT TO REDUCE THE SMALL LOOKING  EARS YOU CAN SEE ANOTHER EXAMPLE HERE. IT'S A VERY SMALL EAR WHEN YOU  START TO COMPARE IT TO THE EARS THAT ARE AROUND IT. SURE. SO YEAH I'M  GOING TO GET IT HARVESTED BUT PROBABLY NOT A FULL EAR SO MY EAR COUNT  I'D PROBABLY GIVE THIS ABOUT A HALF AN EAR. SO WHEN YOU ARE LOOKING AT  YOUR COUNTS YOU CAN KIND OF START JUDGING SOME THINGS WE TRY TO  ENCOURAGE GROWERS THAT WHEN YOU'RE DOING YOUR EAR COUNTS WHERE  SHOULD YOU END UP IF YOU'RE IN A CORN BEAN ROTATION. WE THINK THAT YOUR PLANT COUNT COMPARED TO YOUR EAR COUNT SHOULD  ON AVERAGE BE ABOUT WITHIN 1200 OF ONE ANOTHER AND ANY MORE LOSS  THAN THAT WE THINK THAT'S TOO MUCH. IF YOU'RE IN CORN AND CORN OR  DEALING WITH A LOT OF HEAVY RESIDUE THEN WE'D SAY 2000 YEARS PER ACRE  SHOULD BE YOUR LIMIT. NO MORE LOSS THAN THAT OTHERWISE WE THINK WE'RE  JUST LEAVING TOO MANY DOLLARS ON THE TABLE.

TEASE
WHEN WE COME BACK, REFLECTING ON A STORM THAT STILL LIVES ON...IN THE  MINDS OF THE SURVIVORS.

IN THE COUNTRY
IN THE COUNTRY - BROUGHT TO YOU BY KUBOTA'S M5 SERIES - BRINGING NEW  LEVELS OF COMFORT TO HARD WORK.  LEARN MORE AT KUBOTA.COM, OR VISIT  YOUR LOCAL KUBOTA DEALER TODAY.  AS TEXAS PREPARES TO FACE THE ONSLAUGHT OF A STORM NAMED HARVEY...WE  ALSO WANT TO RECOGNIZE THE ANNIVERSARY OF A MAJOR HURRICANE THAT HIT  A QUARTER CENTURY AGO IN SOUTH FLORIDA. IT WAS 25 YEARS AGO WHEN HURRICANE ANDREW SLAMMED INTO SOUTHERN  FLORIDA, NEARLY WIPING THE CITY OF HOMESTEAD FROM THE MAP WITH ITS 175  MILE AN HOUR WINDS. ANDREW WAS ONE OF THE FEW CATEGORY FIVE  HURRICANES EVER TO HIT THE U-S. MORE THAN 65-THOUSAND HOMES WERE DESTROYED. SIXTY FIVE PEOPLE DIED.  AND DAMAGE ESTIMATES WERE AS HIGH AS 26 BILLION DOLLARS. UNTIL KATRINA  ANDREW WAS THE COSTLIEST NATURAL DISASTER IN THE U-S. THOUSANDS OF ACRES OF MANGROVES SNAPPED LIKE TOOTHPICKS. ONE OF  THE AG RESEARCH FACILITIES OWNED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA TOOK A  DIRECT HIT FROM THAT 1992 STORM. IT'S WHERE TROPICAL FRUIT STUDIES ARE CONDUCTED. THE UNIVERSITY SAYS  WINDS TOPPLED ENTIRE GROVES OF MANGOS, AVOCADOS, AND PAPAYAS. IT TOOK YEARS FOR  THE GROVES TO BE RE-ESTABLISHED. RESEARCHERS SAY AS A RESULT OF THE  STORM, THEY SHIFTED THEIR FOCUS ON HOW DIFFERENT FRUIT CROPS REACT  AND RECOVER TO HURRICANE-FORCE WINDS. UNBELIEVABLE STORY - 25 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK.

TEASE
THAT'S ALL THE TIME WE HAVE THIS MORNING. WE'RE GLAD YOU TUNED IN.  FOR TYNE, BETSY AND MIKE I'M CLINTON GRIFFITHS. HAVE A GREAT DAY. AGDAY IS POWERED BY RAM TRUCKS - AMERICA'S LONGEST LASTING PICKUPS.

Back to news


Comments

 
Spell Check

No comments have been posted to this News Article

Corn College TV Education Series

2014_Team_Shot_with_Logo

Get nearly 8 hours of educational video with Farm Journal's top agronomists. Produced in the field and neatly organized by topic, from spring prep to post-harvest. Order now!

Markets

Market Data provided by QTInfo.com
Brought to you by Beyer
Close