AgDay Daily Recap -July 15, 2015

July 15, 2015 02:57 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY
JULY 15, 2015

OPEN HEADLINES:
COMING UP TODAY ON AGDAY - A LEADERSHIP IS COMING FOR ONE OF THE NATION'S BIGGEST AG GROUPS. CALIFORNIA FINDS ANOTHER CASE OF CITRUS GREENING. IMPROVING RANGE CONDITIONS HELPING SHEEP GROWERS IN TEXAS MEET DEMAND. IN AGRINBUSINESS...A LOOK AT SOYBEAN MARKETS…ALL OF A SUDDEN IT'S NOT THE ACRES WE''RE LOOKING AT, IT'S THE CROP ACTUALLY PLANTED AND OUT THERE AND GROWING GREENS WITHOUT THE SOIL. AGDAY-BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE DEPENDABLE, LONG LASTING CHEVY SILVERADO…
STALLMAN DEPARTURE:
GOOD MORNING I'M CLINTON GRIFFITHS. WITH 16 YEARS AT THE HELM OF THE NATION'S LARGEST FARM ORGANIZATION, FARM BUREAU PRESIDENT BOB STALLMAN SAYS IT'S TIME TO HAND-OVER THE REINS...AND THAT'S OUR TOP STORY ON AGDAY.
CORN BELT:
OF COURSE, WE'VE TALKED A LOT ABOUT THE VERY WET CONDITIONS AND SAGGING CROP RATINGS IN THE EASTERN CORN BELT. ILLINOIS, INDIANA AND OHIO ALL SET RAINFALL RECORDS IN JUNE. AND JULY HAS SEEN ITS SHARE OF RAIN AS WELL. IN INDIANA, JUST 46-PERCENT OF THE CORN IS RATED GOOD TO EXCELLENT. IT'S 56-PERCENT IN ILLINOIS BUT IF YOU HEAD WEST THERE'S A BIG SPIKE IN IMPROVEMENT.
WCB CONDITIONS:
IN IOWA 82-PERCENT OF THE CORN CROP IS GOOD TO EXCELLENT. IT'S 85-PERCENT IN MINNESOTA. 73-PERCENT IN NEBRASKA AND 77-PERCENT IN SOUTH DAKOTA…
TEXAS LAMBS:
 FROM PASTURES DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS TO A GROCERY STORE NEAR YOU…JESSICA DOMEL FOLLOWS TEXAS RANCHERS AS THEY ANSWER THE GROWING DEMAND FOR LAMB.
GMO BILL:
 THE HOUSE AG COMMITTEE SPENT TUESDAY DEBATING AND ULTIMATELY PASSING A BILL TARGETING STATE GMO LABELING LAWS. THE SAFE AND AFFORDABLE FOOD LABELING ACT--WAS INTRODUCED BY KANSAS REPRESENTATIVE MIKE POMPEO LAST YEAR. THE BILL BLOCKS STATE AND LOCAL LAWS REQUIRING FOOD COMPANIES DISCLOSE GENETICALLY ENGINEERED INGREDIENTS ON THE LABLE....INSTEAD CREATING FEDERAL STANDARDS FOR VOLUNTARY LABLES...ELIMINATING A MULTIPLE STATE PATCH WORK OF LAWS. ADVOCACY GROUPS SAY CONSUMERS SHOULD HAVE THAT INFORMATION. THOSE AGAINST LABELING CALL IT RED TAPE THAT ULTIMATELY LEADS TO HIGHER PRICES.
CALI GREENING:
THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SAYS IT'S FOUND A SECOND TREE IN CALIFORNIA INFECTED WITH CITRUS GREENING. THE DEADLY BACTERIA WAS DISCOVERED IN A 20 YEAR OLD, RESIDENTIAL KUMQUAT TREE. IT'S THE SECOND DISCOVERY IN THREE YEARS--THE FIRST WAS BACK IN 2012--ABOUT 15 MILES FROM THE NEW LOCATION. AG INSPECTORS, ARE CHECKING OTHER CITRUS TREES IN THE AREA AND PREPARING A QUARANTINE.
CALIFORNIA'S 2 BILLION DOLLAR CITRUS INDUSTRY GROWS ROUGHLY 80 PERCENT OF THE COUNTRY'S FRESH CITRUS. FLORIDA CONTINUES TO STRUGGLE UNDER THE WEIGHT OF THE OUTBREAK. IN USDA'S LATEST PRODUCTION REPORT, THIS YEAR FLORIDA IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE ABOUT HALF THE AMOUNT OF FRUIT IT GREW IN 2007.
TEASE:
UP NEXT WITH THE STRUGGLE TO GET SOME SOYBEANS IN THE GROUND, PRICES ARE SWINGING HIGHER. WE'VE GOT A LOOK AT MARKET DIRECTION IN TODAY'S ANALYSIS.
PROPANE PRICES:
ENERGY ANALYSTS AT IOWA'S DEPARTMENT OF AG SAY PROPANE PRICES ARE THE LOWEST THEY'VE BEEN IN THE PAST 20 YEARS.  SOME PLACES SEEING PRICES AS LOW AS 70 CENTES PER GALLON…BACK IN 2013 PRODUCERS WERE PAYING A RECORD--UPWARDS OF FIVE DOLLARS A GALLON.
CME REPORT:
IN AGRIBUSINESS IT WAS MIXED DAY FOR MARKETS...INCLUDING SOME STRENGTH IN CATTLE CONTRACTS. LETS GET THE DETAILS FROM THE FLOOR OF THE CME.
ANALYSIS INTRO:
SOYBEAN PRICES HAVE ADJUSTED TO THOSE PLANTING HARDSHIPS OVER THE LAST COUPLE OF WEEKS. NOW ABOVE TEN DOLLARS ON CONTRACTS THOUGH MID-2016 IN ANALYSIS THIS MORNING, TYNE MORGAN TAKES A LOOK AT BEAN PRICES AND FUTURE POTENTIAL.
OHIO HOGS:
ONE OF THE FIRST STATES TO REPORT PEDV IN 2014 IS NOW SEEING A SURGE IN ITS SWINE POPULATION. USDA SAYS OHIO REPORTS A 16 PERCENT YEAR OVER YEAR INCREASE IN ITS PIG POPULATION. THE REASON, FARMERS EXPECTED MORE DEATH LOSS FROM THE DISEASE IN 2015 BUT SO FAR OUTBREAKS HAVE BEEN MUCH MORE MILD. AND OHIO ISN'T ALONE. AS OF JUNE, THE U.S HERD HAD GROWN 9 PERCENT TO NEARLY 67 MILLION HEAD. BETWEEN PORK AND POULTRY DISEASES WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR FEED USAGE--ESPECIALLY AFTER LOSING ROUGHLY 47 MILLION BIRDS SINCE DECEMBER.
FEED USAGE:
IF YOU BREAK DOWN FEED USAGE IT'S ONE OF THE ITEMS THAT SOUNDS LIKE THAT COULD BE A BIG IMPACTOR. WHEN WE RAN THE NUMBERS AT MAXIMUM IT WILL BE ABOUT 150 BUSHELS A YEAR ANNUALLY. IT IS PROBABLY UNDER 75 MILLION BUSHELS IN REALITY. SO IT HAS SOME IMPACT BUT ITS MORE PERCEPTIVE THAN THAT FROM A BIGGER PICTURE PERSPECTIVE WE HAD SOME FUNDAMENTAL CHANGE OVER THE CROPS LAST MONTH. THAT WILL SUGGEST THIS REALLY BEARISH SHADOW TO EXISTENCE PROBABLY INST OUT THERE ANYMORE SO ANY DIPS AND DROPS AND PRICE ESPECIALLY IN THE LATE SUMMER FALL AND YOU WILL REALLY NEED TO CLAMP ON AND GET MORE AGGRESSIVE BUYING. WHEN WE LOOK AT THE PORK PICTURES AND YOU TALK ABOUT PERCEPTION IN THE POULTRY IN THIS STORY WE HAD THE SAME AT PED AND THIS YEAR WERE LOOKING AT SOME HOG NUMBERS THIS PRODUCERS QUICKER THAN WE THOUGHT. MUCH LARGER LAST HOGS REPORTED 108% COUNCIL DOWN 6% THIS YEAR WERE GETTING FURTHER AND FURTHER IN THE DROUGHT IN 2012 FARMERS ARE HOLDING BACK THOSE COWS AND HEFFERS THERE BUILDING CATTLE HERD. SO WHEN WE LOOK AT IT FROM THE CUMULATIVE PERSPECTIVE FALL LOWS OR LATE SUMMER LOW PRICES NEED TO BE LOOKED AT MORE LONG TERM AS BUY OPPORTUNITIES FOR END USERS.
ITC HYDROPONIC:
FARMING INVOLVES CAREFUL CARE OF YOUR SOIL. AFTERALL IF YOU DON'T MAINTAIN YOUR SOIL, HOW CAN YOU EXPECT STRONG YIELDS BUT WHAT IF YOU'RE A FARMER AND YOU DON'T EVEN NEED SOIL TO GROW A CROP? IN THIS VIDEO PROVIDED BY CALIFORNIA BOUNTIFUL T-V, WE VISIT SUNDIAL FARM IN VISTA, CALIFORNIA WHERE YOU CAN FIND THE INGREDIENTS FOR SOIL-LESS SALAD.
CLOSE:
THAT'S ALL THE TIME WE HAVE THIS MORNING. WE'RE GLAD YOU TUNED IN.
 

 

Back to news


Comments

 
Spell Check

No comments have been posted to this News Article

Corn College TV Education Series

2014_Team_Shot_with_Logo

Get nearly 8 hours of educational video with Farm Journal's top agronomists. Produced in the field and neatly organized by topic, from spring prep to post-harvest. Order now!

Markets

Market Data provided by QTInfo.com
Brought to you by Beyer
Close