AgDay Daily Recap -October 7, 2015

October 8, 2015 02:57 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY

October 7, 2015

Opening:
COMING UP TODAY ON AGDAY FARM DAMAGES MOUNT AFTER POUNDING RAINS IN THE
SOUTHEAST.
INDIANA FARMERS SHATTERED A JUNE RAINFALL RECORD-HOW ARE THE CONDITIONS DURING HARVEST?
"IT'S TAKING MORE PATIENCE THIS YEAR BECAUSE OF ALL THE EXTREMES.
IN AGRIBUSINESS...WHAT'S PREVENTING A RALLY IN WHEAT?
THE EXPORT COMPETITION IS HISTORICALLY STRONG, WHETHER IT'S FROM THE BLACK SEA OR EUROPE. WE ARE THE RESIDUAL SUPPLIER OF WHEAT,
AND THE PAY-OFF OF TURNING CROPLAND INTO SOMETHING MUCH TALLER THAN ROW CROPS.
AGDAY-BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE DEPENDABLE, LONG LASTING CHEVY SILVERADO.
Betsy Jibben on flooding in South Carolina:
GOOD MORNING I'M BETSY JIBBEN. CLINTON IS ON ASSIGNMENT. SOUTH CAROLINA RESIDENTS START THE
SLOW AND OFTEN-PAINFUL PROCESS TO REBUILD THEIRLIVES AND PROPERTY AFTER AN EPIC STORM SWAMPS THE PAUL-MET-O STATE.
AND THE ECONOMIC UPHEAVAL WILL BE FELT FOR MONTHS FOR PEOPLE IN THE CITIES AND ON THE
FARMS.
IT'S TOO EARLY AT THIS POINT TO ASSESS THE IMPACTS ON AGRICULTURE IN THE STATE, BUT THEY'RE
EXPECTED TO BE SUBSTANTIAL. RAINFALL TOTALS FROM THE WEEKEND WERE AS HIGH AS TWO FEET.
ROBBIE SPRINGS OPERATES A FARM IN LAKE CITY, SOUTH CAROLINA. HE SENT THIS FOOTAGE TO US.
ROBBIE SAYS THEY HAD RAIN FOR TWO WEEKS NOW, INCLUDING 23 INCHES OVER THE WEEKEND. HE SAYS THEY'VE LOST A LOT OF BEAN FIELDS. 
BEFORE THIS RAIN, THEY HAD A VERY DRY SUMMER. DRYLAND CORN WAS ONLY AVERAGING ABOUT 28
BUSHELS AN ACRE.  THIS WEEK'S "NASS" CROP PROGRESS REPORT FROM SOUTH CAROLINA FOCUSES ON THE STORM AND ITS IMPACT.
CROP REPORTER POWELL SMITH FROM LEXINGTON COUNTY SAYS HIS AREA RECEIVED 18 INCHES OF RAIN
LAST WEEK. IT HAD ANOTHER FIVE INCHES THE PREVIOUS WEEK.
POWELL SAYS MANY ROADS ARE WASHED OUT, BRIDGES ARE COMPROMISED AND SERIOUS DITCH
EROSION HAS OCCURRED I FIELDS, WATERWAYS AND ROADSIDE DITCHES IT'LL TAKE SEVERAL WEEKS TO ACCURATELY ASSESS THE AGRICULTURAL DAMAGE.
FROM ORANGEBURG COUNTY, MARK NETTLES SAYS MOST ROW CROPS THAT WERE NOT ALREADY
HARVESTED WILL MOST LIKELY BE NEGATIVELY IMPACTED BY THE RAINS. FALL-VEGETABLES ARE ALSO
AT RISK.
AND HUGH GRAY IN ALLENDALE COUNTY SAYS PEANUT AND COTTON HARVEST ARE BEHIND. THE QUALITY OF DUG PEANUTS AND OPENED COTTON COULD TAKE A SIGNIFICANT HIT. 
STATEWIDE ONLY 12-PERCENT OF COTTON HAS BEEN HARVESTED. AND 88-PERCENT HAS OPEN BOLLS WHICH LOUISIANA COTTON FARMERS HAVE BEGUN PICKING THEIR CROP. WHAT THEY ARE FINDING IS DISAPPOINTING ON TWO FRONTS --LOWER YIELDS THAN LAST YEAR AND LOW PRICES.
AN EXTREMELY DRY JULY AND AUGUST HAVE LOWERED YIELDS MORE THAN 20 PERCENT FROM THE TWO
PREVIOUS YEARS.
"OUR STATEWIDE AVERAGE MAY BE WELL BELOW 1000 POUNDS OF LINT, WHICH IS A BIG DISAPPOINTMENT. THAT'S ALSO COMPOUNDED BY THE LOW COTTON PRICES. IT'S NOT GOING TO BE A
GOOD YEAR."
"I KNOW A LOT OF THE LATER PLANTING REALLY DID SUFFER FROM A MOISTURE STANDPOINT, AND WHETHER WE GET THAT HARVESTED OR NOT, I THINK RIGHT NOW, IT'S A TOSS-UP FROM THAT STANDPOINT.">
IN LESS THAN A DECADE, LOUISIANA HAS SEEN ITS COTTON ACREAGE DECREASE FROM A HIGH OF NEARLY 850-THOUSAND ACRES TO THIS YEAR'S CROP OF APPROXIMATELY 120-THOUSAND ACRES. BECAUSE OF
THE REDUCED YIELDS AND DEPRESSED PRICES, FROMME IS NOT SURE IF THE ENTIRE CROP WILL BE
HARVESTED. (THE I80 HARVEST TOUR -SPNOSORED BY ENLIST WEED
CONTROL SYSTEM FROM DOW AGROSCIENCES.COMBINING THE PROVEN CONTROL OF A NEW 2,4-D AND
GLYPHOSATE. TAKE CONTROL OF TOUGH WEEDS LIKE NEVER BEFORE)
Harvest Tour:
OUR NEXT STOP ON THE I-80 HARVEST TOUR IS NORTHERN INDIANA. THE STATE EXPERIENCED A
GROWING SEASON LIKE NONE OTHER. THE STATE BROKE A JUNE RAINFALL RECORD. AND JULY
WASN'T FAR BEHIND.
NOW, HERE AT HARVEST TIME, SOYBEAN CUTTING IS AHEAD OF AVERAGE, BUT CORN IS RUNNING BEHIND.
JUST UNDER A GOLDEN SKY.. 4097 YOU CAN HEAR THE HUM OF JIM TRAYERT'S COMBINE..
THROUGHOUT THIS OCTOBER EVENING.. HARVEST IS HERE.. 
MOM DORIS AND SON JIM ARE IN THE CAB.. TONIGHT, IT'S A TEAM EFFORT TO GET THE CROP OUT
OF THE GROUND.
"JIMMY USUALLY RUNS THE SEMI AND I RUN THE AUGER WAGON. SO, I'VE BEEN DOING THIS A LONG-TIME."

"PRETTY MUCH COULDN'T ASK FOR BETTER WEATHER FOR HARVEST THIS YEAR. IT FEELS GOOD TO JUST GO. IT LOOKS LIKE WE HAVE A GOOD STRETCH OF WEATHER COMING

THIS HARVEST WEATHER IS A DIFFERENT SIGHT THAN WHAT MANY INDIANA FARMERS EXPERIENCED THIS
GROWING SEASON.. WHEN HEAVY RAIN PELTED MUCH OF THE STATE IN JUNE AND JULY.. AUGUST JUST DRIED UP.
"THIS IS A POCKET THAT ESCAPED THE WORST OF IT. WE DEFINITELY HAD MORE RAIN BUT IT WAS VERY TIMELY FOR US. BUT YOU DIDN'T HAVE TO GO AS FAR NORTH, SOUTH, EAST OR WEST,"

BECAUSE OF THAT, TRAYAERT SAYS HIS YIELD IS SPARED.
"I WOULD SAY ABOVE AVERAGE HERE IN OUR NEIGHBOR AREA. BUT THERE COULD BE EASILY BELOW AVERAGE OR AVERAGE, DEPENDS IF YOU GOT HIT BY THE RAIN OR NOT,"
 
AN HOUR SOUTH...
GEORGE KROM IS ALSO ROLLING ALONG..
"THIS IS PERFECT WEATHER, MAN,"
A SIGH OF RELIEF..
AFTER THE 30 INCHES OF RAIN HE RECEIVED THIS SEASON.
"IT'S TAKING MORE PATIENCE THIS YEAR BECAUSE OF ALL THE EXTREMES."
 "I THINK IT'S AN ANXIETY. WE KNOW IT'S VARIABLE AND WE KNOW THE PRICE OF CROPS ARE DOWN. WE WANT TO SEE WHAT IT'S GOING TO DO. THE ONLY WAY WE'RE GOING TO SEE IT IS BY GETTING IT HARVESTED,"
KROM SAYS EVEN THOUGH IT WAS A STRUGGLE, HE WAS ABLE TO SIDE-DRESS HIS CORN. OTHERS WEREN'T
SO FORTUNATE. AND DESPITE EXTRA EFFORTS, SOME TEST WEIGHTS ARE LOW, EAR LENGTHS ARE LESS, AND THE YIELD MONITOR IS VARIABLE.
"THE CORN WILL END UP IN THE 140S AND 150S HERE. AND THAT'S BELOW AVERAGE BUT STILL NOT A FAILURE,"
 "SOYBEANS I THINK WILL BE BELOW AVERAGE BECAUSE THE ONES WE'VE HARVESTED JUST YIELDED AVERAGE,"
IT'S GOING TO BE HARD TO BRING UP THOSE AVERAGES WHEN YOU HAVE 10-15-20 PERCENT AT A ZERO,"
STILL, KROM SAYS IT'S AN IMPROVEMENT FROM WHAT HE EXPECTED IN JUNE.
"A LITTLE. AS IT QUIT RAINING, THE CROPS HERE GREW OUT OF IT. AND MAYBE CAMOUFLAGES SOME PROBLEMS. BUT IT IMPROVED.MAYBE SHOW THIS SOT AND START NEXT SENTENCE BACK WITH JIM'S NIGHT SETTING SO IT ENDS WELL. AND AS THE SUN SETS ON ANOTHER GROWING SEASON..
IT JUST MAY BE A FARMER'S OPTIMISM THAT HELPS GET THEM THROUGH CHALLANGES THEY FACE YEAR AFTER YEAR.
IT'S THAT ETERNAL OPTIMISM FARMERS POSSESS, THAT GET THEM THROUGH HARVEST'S CHALLANGES
YEAR AFTER YEAR..
AND LATE FALL NIGHTS UNDER A SKY LIKE THIS HELPS TOO.
"IT'S TAKING MORE PATIENCE THIS YEAR BECAUSE OF ALL THE EXTREMES,"
"BUT WE STILL GOT A CROP. AND WE'LL BE FARMING NEXT YEAR,"
NOW BOTH FARMERS SAY DESPITE ALL OF THE RAIN, PEST PRESSURE IS DOWN. THEY HAVE SEEN SOME
SUDDEN DEATH IN SOME POCKETS OF SOYBEANS. AND THERE ARE ALSO SOME LEAF DISEASES, BUT BOTH FEEL IT WON'T ROB YIELD AT THIS STAGE OF THE GAME.
Crop watch:
FROM SOYBEANS TO SORGHUM, CINDI CLAWSON TAKES A CLOSER LOOK AT HARVEST
UPDATES. GOOD MORNING, CINDI. GOOD MORNING BETSY.
LET'S START OFF CROPWATCH IN PEOTONE, ILLINOIS. DESPITE OVER 12 INCHES OF RAIN IN JUNE, FARMERS IN THAT AREA SAY THEIR SOYBEANS ARE FAIRING QUITE WELL. ONE FARMER SAYS HE EXPECTS HIS BEAN YIELD TO BE AVERAGE TO ABOVE AVERAGE.
USDA SAYS 60 PERCENT OF ILLINOIS' SOYBEAN CROP IS RANKED GOOD TO EXCELLENT.
MOVING SOTUH TO NEWTON, KANSAS, MARK VOTH SAYS THIS IS SOME OF THE TALLEST
SORGHUM HE'S GROWN ALL YEAR.
AFTER A WET SUMMER, HE STARTED HARVEST MIDSEPTEMBER. USDA PEGS 73 PERCENT OF KANSAS SORGHUM IS MATURE.
WELL COMING UP IN JUST A FEW MINUTES WE'LL HAVE A LOOK AT YOUR NATIONAL FORECAST BETSY
PLENTY MORE AHEAD ON AGDAY...WHY HAS IT BEEN SO DIFFICULT TO GET WHEAT PRICES TO RALLY? 
FIND OUT WHY GENERAL MILLS IS PULLING ONE OF ITS MOST POPULAR CEREALS FROM STORE SHELVES. 
AND TALL TIMBER FROM TENNESSEE.... (I'M CHUCK FROM ROW CROPS TO TREES. WE'LL SHOW
YOU HOW QUICKLY A FIELD CAN BECOME A FOREST.
THAT STORY COMING FROM JACKSON TENNESSEE COMING UP ON AGDAY)

(WINFIELD IS YOUR TRUSTED AGRONOMIC AND BUSINESS PARTNER WITH THE EXPERTISE, PRODUCTS
AND INSIGHTS TO HELP YOU MAKE THE RIGHT DECISIONS, FROM PLANNING TO HARVEST, IN TODAY'S
COMPLEX AGRIBUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)

DECEMBER WHEAT IN KANSAS CITY, MINNEAPOLIS, AND CHICAGO SAW SOME GAINS IN THE MARKET TUESDAY.
BUT IT'S BEEN A STRUGGLE. CLINTON GRIFFITHS TAKES A CLOSER LOOK AT THE
LACK OF A RALLY IN THE WHEAT MARKET.
AgriBusiness Desk:
(OUR GUEST HERE AT THE AGRIBUSINESS DESK, BRIAN BASTING, ADVANCED TRADING. BRIAN, LET'S TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE WHEAT MARKET. THE GLOBAL SITUATION SEEMS TO TELL US THAT THERE'S TOO MUCH WHEAT OUT THERE. AS WE GET READY TO KIND OF PLANT SOME OF THESE FALL CROPS AND MAYBE THINK ABOUT SPRING NEXT YEAR AND PLANTING WHEAT, HOW DO YOU MAKE THE DECISION IN TO PUT THAT IN THE GROUND.>>
EVERY GROWERS SITUATION IS DIFFERENT, CLINTON. RIGHT NOW, I WOULD EMPHASIZE AS YOU MENTION THAT THE EXPORT COMPETITION IS HISTORICALLY STRONG, WHETHER IT'S FROM THE BLACK SEA OR EUROPE. WE ARE THE RESIDUAL SUPPLIER OF WHEAT, SO...>> WHAT DO YOU MEAN THERE--RESIDUAL SUPPLIER?>> WE ARE THE LAST RESORT THAT A BUYER IS GOING TO COME TO. THEY ARE GOING TO GO TO THE BLACK SEA, THEY ARE GOING TO GO TO EUROPE, THEY ARE GOING TO GO TO ARGENTINA, AUSTRALIA, BEFORE THEY COME TO THE U.S. WE ARE THE PLACE OF LAST RESORT RIGHT NOW.>> IS IT THE DOLLAR? OR THE PRICE OF OUR CURRENCY THAT AFFECTS THAT OR IS IT JUST LOCATION?>> JUST LOCATION, PRIMARILY LOCATION AND THEN THE LARGE SUPPLY IN THOSE COMPETING NATIONS IS JUST OVERWHELMING THE MARKET RIGHT NOW.>> SO NOT A LOT OF HOPE FOR OUR PRICES TO MOVE HIGHER?>> WELL, THINGS CAN CHANGE. EVERY YEAR IS DIFFERENT. I THINK A GOAL WANTS TO MAINTAIN FLEXIBILITY, BUT LOOK FOR OPPORTUNITIES TO GET PUT OPTIONS IN PLACE, TOO PROTECT. IF YOU ARE GOING TO GROW 16 WHEAT--LOOK FOR OPPORTUNITIES TO GET THAT FLOOR IN PLACE, BELIEVE YOUR UPSIDE OAT.>> AS WE PREPARE FOR '16, WHAT ARE WE SEEING OUT THERE AS FAR AS ANTICIPATION OF PUTTING THESE ACRES IN AND PEOPLE STICKING WITH WHEAT?>> PROBABLY S LITTLE AS A MONTH AGO, CLINTON, IN THE MIDWEST WE WERE LOOKING FOR A BIG DROP IN SOFT RED ACRES, BUT NOW NOT SO MUCH, PROBABLY A MODEST DROP IN PLACES LIKE ILLINOIS, INDIANA, OHIO VERSUS A YEAR AGO. SOME OF THE NORTHERN AREAS MAYBE MICHIGAN ARE GOING TO PLANT NEARLY AS MUCH WHEAT, MAYBE A BIT MORE THAN LAST YEAR, SO IT'S A BIT OF REGIONAL TREND THERE. BUT I DO THINK WE ARE GOING TO PLANT MORE SOFT WHEAT THAN WE THOUGHT EARLIER THIS SUMMER. IN THE WEST, I THINK WE ARE GOING TO PLANT NEAR AS MUCH AS WE DID A YEAR AGO.>> OK, WE TALKED QUITE A BIT ABOUT FEED WHEAT AND IT BEING AN OPTION OUT THERE FOR FEEDERS. IS THAT HELPING OUR MARKET OR JUST AT LEAST PROVIDING A USE FOR IT? >> IT PROVIDES A USE FOR IT. OUR GRAIN STOCK'S REPORT THIS WEEK, CLINTON, SHOWED THAT WE HAD RESPECTABLE WHEAT FEEDING THIS SUMMER, NOT AS STRONG AS IT WAS A COUPLE YEARS AGO, FOR EXAMPLE, WHEN CORN WAS $ 6, $ 7 A BUSHEL, BUT AT LEAST THERE'S SOME DECENT FEED OUT THERE. >> AT LEAST SOMETHING TO HANG OUR HAT ON A LITTLE BIT. ALL RIGHT, BRIAN, THANKS APPRECIATE THAT. WE WILL BE RIGHT BACK WITH MORE AGDAY, RIGHT AFTER THESE
MESSAGES.)

(TO TALK WITH BRIAN ONE-ON-ONE, CALL ADVANCE
TRADING AT 800-664-2314 OR HEAD ONLINE TO ADVANCETRADING.
COM)


(GROWING CORN AND SOYBEANS IS ABOUT MORE THAN
JUST YOUR YIELD. IT'S WHAT YOU WERE MEANT TO DO.
VISIT ACRES OF POSSIBILITY.COM TO DISCOVER THE
POTENTIAL OF MYCOGEN SEEDS)

National Weather:
WELCOME BACK TO AGDAY WITH METEOROLOGIST CINDI CLAWSON. CINDI, IT LOOKS AS IF SOME POCKETS
IN THE SOUTHEAST WILL RECEIVE A MUCH NEEDED DRYDOWN.
YEAH, NO KIDDING. THAT BLANK AREA IN THE SOUTHEAST IS WONDERFUL NEWS TO A LOT OF FOLKS
DOWN THERE. LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT THE MAPS. YOU KNOW IT'S GOING TO TAKE A LONG TIME. FOR THE
SOUTHEAST TO RECOVER FROM ALL OF THE RAIN BUT AT LEAST IT'S NOT HAVING ANY MORE ADDITIONAL RAIN IN THE NEXT FEW DAYS WILL BE A BLESSING. NOW THE MAIN FEATURE WE ARE SEEING ACROSS THE UNITED STATES IS A FUNNELS SYSTEM THAT'S GOING TO BE MOVING THROUGH THE UPPER MIDWEST. WE STILL HAVE AN UPPER LOW THAT'S AFFECTING PARTS OF THE FOUR CORNERS REGION INTO THE WESTERN PARTS OF TEXAS AS WELL. PUTTING THE MAP INTO MOTION, YOU CAN SEE SOME OF THE RAIN IN THE SOUTHWEST, ALSO IN THE NORTHWEST. WE WILL SEE SOME SHOWERS THERE. BUT WE SEE THIS LOW ENTERING THE NORTHERN PLAINS. THAT WILL PUSH OFF TO THE EAST AND PICKING UP SOME STEAM AS IT'S PUSHING TO THE EAST. SO AS WE GET INTO WEDNESDAY NIGHT INTO THURSDAY MORNING, THAT LOW WAS GOING TO SINK A LITTLE BIT FARTHER INTO THE SOUTHEAST. GREAT LAKES ESPECIALLY THE WESTERN GREAT LAKES WILL BE SEEING SOME SHOWERS, MAYBE SOME RUMBLES OF THUNDER THERE. AS WE CONTINUE THROUGH THURSDAY, WE WILL SEE THE COLD FRONT SWEEP THROUGH THE CORN BELT. WE WILL SEE THAT PICKING UP MORE MOISTURE AS IT DOES. SO LOOK FOR PARTS OF THE CENTRAL CORN BELT TO SEE SOME SHOWERS AGAIN AND SOME THUNDERSTORMS THERE. THAT LOW WILL CONTINUE TO PUSH ON OFF AS WE GET INTO THURSDAY NIGHT AND INTO FRIDAY NIGHT AS WELL. HERE'S A LOOK AT THE PAST 24 HOURS. THAT'S GREAT NEWS. THE FACT WE'RE NOT ADDING TO THAT IS GOING TO BE GREAT NEWS AS WELL. IT'S BEEN RAINY IN SPOTS AND HEAVY RAIN IN SPOTS. THAT'S ESPECIALLY IN PARTS OF NEW MEXICO. THE NEXT 24 HOURS IS GOING TO SHOW THAT WE CONTINUE TO SEE THE RAIN THERE FROM THE UPPER LEVEL LOW TO THE SOUTH. THEN THE NEXT RAIN MAKER IS HERE IN THE GREAT LAKES WITH THAT LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM. HERE'S A LOOK AT TEMPERATURES. IT'S REALLY NOT BAD FOR ANYONE AS WE HEAD OUT THERE TODAY. A LITTLE BIT ON THE WARM SIDE AND SOUTHERN TEXAS BUT FAIRLY COMFORTABLE FOR MOST OF THE COUNTRY. BUT WATCH WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THAT COLD FRONT GETS FURTHER TO THE SOUTHEAST, WE'RE GOING TO INTRODUCE SOME COOLER TEMPERATURES TO THE NORTH-CENTRAL UNITED STATES. MOST OF US IN THE 50S THROUGH 60S AND 70S FOR OVERNIGHT LOWS. AS WE GET INTO HIGHS TOMORROW, WE WILL SLIGHTLY SEE SOME COOLER AIR COMING IN BEHIND THAT FRONT.
OTHERWISE, LOOKING AT 70S AND 80S FOR A LOT OF THE SOUTHERN PART OF THE COUNTRY. AS WE TAKE A QUICK LOOK AT THE JET STREAM, YOU'LL PICK OUT THAT UPPER LEVEL LOW IN THE SOUTHWEST AND NOT MUCH HAPPENING IN THE NORTHEAST BUT WE WILL SEE SOME TROUGH THAT'S GOING TO BE SLIDING ACROSS THE AREA. THAT'S WHERE THE FRONTAL SYSTEM IS.
THEN WE WILL SEE ANOTHER TROUGH WITH THAT COOLER AIR AS WE GET INTO THIS TIME NEXT WEEK TO
THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES. THAT'S A LOOK AT YOUR NATIONAL FORECAST NOW LET'S CHECK OUT .
Regional forecast:
SOME LOCAL CITIES.PALERMO, CALIFORNIA, HAS PLENTY OF SUNSHINE WITH YOU TODAY WITH A HIGH OF
84 DEGREES. CROOKSTON, MINNESOTA, SHOWERS MANY A RUMBLE OF THUNDER THERE. THE HIGH
TEMPERATURE IS 62 DEGREES. AND LAWRENCEBURG,
TENNESSEE IS SUNNY AND NICE BUT A HIGH OF 83.

UP NEXT BEFORE YOU HAVE BREAKFAST, YOU MAY
WANT TO HEAR ABOUT A RECALL OF A VERY POPULAR
CEREAL. 
AND LANDOWNERS IN TENNESSEE ARE SEEING A BIG
PAY-OFF BY TAKING SOME LAND OUT OF CROP
PRODUCTION AND PUTTING IT INTO A LONG-TERM
INVESTMENT.
 
(AGDAY -BROUGHT TO YOU BY BASF. GROW SMART
WITH BASF AND GET THE MOST ACRE AFTER ACRE
SEASON AFTER SEASON)

JOHN DEERE'S EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING WON'T BE
INTERUPTED BY A LABOR DISPUTE.
THE COMPANY SAYS IT'S WORKED OUT A DEAL WITH
THE UNION REPRESENTING 10,000 OF ITS WORKERS.
THIS COMES AFTER A DISPUTE SURFACED REGARDING
CONTRACTS WITH FARM AND CONSTRUCTION WORKERS
IN BOTH IOWA AND ILLINOIS.
THE 6-YEAR DEAL, STRUCK BETWEEN JOHN DEERE AND
UNITED AUTO WORKERS, COVERS EMPLOYEES AND
FACILITIES IN THREE STATES. THE EXACT TERMS OF
THE AGREEMENTS AREN'T BEING RELEASED.
NEGOTIATIONS BEGAN IN AUGUST.

GENERAL MILLS RECALLING ONE OF ITS MOST POPULAR
CEREALS AND THE REASON IS CENTERED AROUND
WHEAT.
THE COMPANY VOLUNATARILY RECALLING SEVERAL
DAYS OF JULY PRODUCTION ON CHEERIOS AND HONEY
NUT CHEERIOS MADE IN LODE-EYE CALIFORNIA.
WHEAT FLOUR WAS INTRODUCED INTO THE GLUTENFREE
OAT SYSTEM AT THE FACILITY. AS A RESULT-THE
PRODUCT MAY CONTAIN AN ALLERGIN IN PRODUCTS
LABELED AS GLUTEN-FREE.
PRODUCTS CONTAINIG WHEAT CAN CAUSE ILLNESS OR
SEVERE REACTIONS FOR THOSE WITH WHEAT
ALLERGIES OR GLUTEN INTOLERANCES.
GENERAL MILLS IS TRANSITIONING FIVE VARIETIES OF
CHEERIOS INTO GLUTEN FREE ITEMS.

JUST AHEAD FIND OUT WHY SOME LANDOWNERS ARE
TURNING AWAY FROM ROW-CROPS AND PUTTING THEIR
LAND INTO TREES.
IN THE COUNTRY IS NEXT.

AGDAY-BROUGHT TO YOU BY YAMAHA, MAKERS OF
VIKING SIDE BY SIDES. YAMAHA-REAL WORLD TOUGH)

**********************************************************
(IN THE COUNTRY BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE ALL NEW
KUBOTA SSV SERIES SKID STEERS. YOU ASKED FOR A
QUALITY SKID STEER AND WE DELIVERED. VISIT YOUR
LOCAL KUBOTA DEALER TO TEST DRIVE ONE TODAY)

In the country:
MORE THAN HALF OF TENNESSEE IS COVERED IN TREES. MANY LANDOWNERS DECIDED TO ADD TO THE
TREE POPULATION BY CONVERTING CROP LAND INTO AFOREST. CHUCK DENNEY FROM U-T'S INSTITUTE OF
AGRICULTURE SHOWS US HOW OLD FARMLAND CAN NOW GROW SOMETHING MUCH TALLER THAN ROW
CROPS.

DAVID MERCKER LIKES TO JOKE THAT "JACK AND THE BEANSTALK" WAS HIS FAVORITE CHILDHOOD FABLE.
TODAY THE UT EXTENSION FORESTER HAS HIS OWN VERSION OF A BEANSTALK -THIS 120 ACRE STAND OF TREES AT THE WEST TENNESSEE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER IN JACKSON. -(DR. DAVID MERCKER)
"WE PLANTED 51,000 TREES HERE, 14 DIFFERENT SPECIES -SPECIES THAT WERE ADAPTABLE TO BOTTOMLAND FORESTS."
PERHAPS MOST REMARKABLE ABOUT THIS SITE IS ITS HISTORY. THIS WAS AN EXPERIMENTAL ROW CROP FIELD FOR HALF A CENTURY. HOWEVER, IT FLOODED FREQUENTLY, AND IN 2004, THE DECISION WAS MADE TO CONVERT THE LAND INTO A FOREST, THICK WITH MANY VARIETIES OF TREES.
CERTAIN SPECIES WERE SELECTED BECAUSE THEY CAN TOLERATE THE "WE'VE ESTABLISHED A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT OAKS, EIGHT DIFFERENT SPECIES OF OAKS. WE'VE GOT BALD CYPRESS. WE HAVE SOME LOBLOLLY PINE, AND A VARIETY OF TREES TOO THAT ARE BENEFICIAL FOR WILDLIFE. BUT WE WANTED A DIVERSITY."
(CHUCK DENNEY)
"TREES ARE A RENEWABLE CROP. 52 PERCENT OF THE LAND HERE IS COVERED BY FORESTS, AND HALF A MILLION TENNESSEANS HAVE GOOD TIMBER ON THEIR PROPERTY. HOWEVER LANDOWNERS HAVE TO MANAGE THAT FOREST LAND FOR IT TO MAINTAIN ITS VALUE."
EXPERTS WITH UT AGRESEARCH SAY GROWING THESE TREES SEQUESTERS CARBON DIOXIDE, AND BUILDS ORGANIC MATTER IN THE SOIL,
WHILE RELEASING OXYGEN FOR US TO BREATHE. AS RESEARCHERS STUDY THE GROWTH OF THIS STAND, THEY LEARN INFORMATION THEY CAN PASS ON TO LANDOWNERS.
DR. BOB HAYES)
"AS OTHER PEOPLE BEGIN TO EVALUATE THEIR LAND RESOURCE, PARTICULARLY IN BOTTOMLAND SITUATIONS, THEN THEY CAN SEE WHAT WE'VE DONE HERE. IF THEY HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT IT, THEY CAN COME IN AND SEE WHICH SPECIES ARE ADAPTIVE. WE KNOW SOME THAT WE WOULD RECOMMEND AND SOME WE WOULDN'T RECOMMEND."

THERE ARE PLANS TO THIN THIS FOREST AND HARVEST SOME OF THE TIMBER HERE IN FIVE YEARS.
MEANTIME THE TREES GROW TALL -AND WHAT WAS ONCE AN AGRICULTURAL FIELD IS PRODUCING A NEW TYPE OF CROP IN MODERN TIMES -A NATURAL RESOURCE ALLOWED TO MAKE A COMEBACK.
THIS IS CHUCK DENNEY REPORTING.

TENNESSEE'S MOST ABUNDANT TREE SPECIES IS THE RED MAPLE.
Closing:
THAT'S ALL THE TIME WE HAVE THIS MORNING. WE'RE GLAD YOU TUNED IN.

FOR CLINTON GRIFFITHS AND CINDI CLAWSON I'M BETSY
JIBBEN. HAVE A GOOD DAY.


(HIGH STRENGTH STEEL FOR HIGH STRENGTH
DEPENDABILITY, THE CHEVY SILVERADO IS THE
OFFICIAL NEWS GATHERING VEHICLE OF AGDAY
TELEVISION)
***************************************************************

I'M BETSY JIBBEN. THURSDAY ON AGDAY -SEE HOW
MCDONALDS SWITCH TO ALL DAY BREAKFAST COULD
BENEFIT DAIRY PRODUCERS. AND FIND OUT WHY BEEF
MAY SOON PROVIDE HEALTH BENEFITS OFTEN
ASSOCIATED WITH FISH.
WATCH US WEEKDAYS ON AGDAY.

 

 

Back to news


Comments

 
Spell Check

No comments have been posted to this News Article

Corn College TV Education Series

2014_Team_Shot_with_Logo

Get nearly 8 hours of educational video with Farm Journal's top agronomists. Produced in the field and neatly organized by topic, from spring prep to post-harvest. Order now!

Markets

Market Data provided by QTInfo.com
Brought to you by Beyer
Close