AgDay Daily Recap - August 12, 2011

August 12, 2011 05:22 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY:
AUGUST 12, 2011

USDA REPORT:
GRAIN PRICES CLOSED SHARPLY UP THURSDAY AFTER USDA LOWERED ITS FORECAST FOR THE MAJOR GRAINS. WE HAVE THE NUMBERS AND ANALYSIS FOR YOU. FOR FARMERS STRUGGLING WITH THE WEATHER THIS SEASON, IT PROBABLY COMES AS NO SURPRISE THAT USDA LOWERED ITS FORECAST FOR THIS YEARS MAJOR GRAIN CROPS. BUT THEIR FORECAST IS EVEN LOWER THAN TRADERS HAD ANTICIPATED. IN ITS LATEST REPORT, USDA SAID U.S. FARMERS WILL PRODUCE THE THIRD LARGEST CORN CROP IN HISTORY, BUT IT'LL FALL SIGNIFICANTLY SHORTER THAN THEIR OUTLOOK FROM ONE MONTH AGO. THE NATIONAL AVERAGE CORN YIELD IS FORECAST AT 153 BUSHELS PER ACRE, DOWN NEARLY SIX BUSHELS FROM LAST MONTH'S PROJECTION AND TWO BUSHELS BELOW THE AVERAGE TRADE ESTIMATE. CORN PRODUCTION IS FORECAST AT 12.9 BILLION BUSHELS, 556 MILLION BUSHELS LOWER THAN WHAT USDA PROJECTED IN JULY. USDA PEGS SOYBEAN PRODUCTION AT JUST OVER THREE BILLION BUSHELS. BASED ON AUGUST 1 CONDITIONS, YIELDS ARE EXPECTED TO AVERAGE 41-AND A HALF BUSHELS PER ACRE, DOWN ABOUT TWO BUSHELS FROM THE JULY FORECAST. AGAIN BECAUSE OF WEATHER.

CHIP REAX:
AS WE ANALYZE THE DATA, PRO FARMER EDITOR CHIP FLORY SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER WHAT YOU SHOULD - AND WHAT YOU SHOULD NOT - USE FOR COMPARISON.

DARRELL GOOD:
THANKS CHIP. CONTINUING OUR TEAM COVERAGE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AG ECONOMIST DARREL GOOD SAYS THE SMALLER EXPECTED CORN CROP MAY GET EVEN SMALLER. HE SAYS FOR FARMERS IT COULD MEAN EVEN HIGHER PRICES IN ORDER TO MAKE SURE THERE IS ENOUGH CORN AROUND TO MEET THE DEMAND.

SORGHUM:
IN OTHER FEED GRAINS, USDA SEES A SHARP REDUCTION IN THE SORGHUM YIELD AND PRODUCTION. PROLONGED DROUGHT AND EXCESSIVE HEAT IN THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN PLAINS IMPACTED THE GROWING SEASON. SORGHUM EXPORTS ARE PROJECTED 20 MILLION BUSHELS LOWER.

COTTON:
AND ONE OF THE LARGEST PRODUCTION DECLINES THIS YEAR WAS IN COTTON, AS DROUGHT PLAGUED MUCH OF THE COTTON BELT. ALL COTTON PRODUCTION IS FORECAST AT 16.5 MILLION BALES, DOWN 9% FROM LAST YEAR. BALE WEIGHT AND ACREAGE IS ALSO DOWN. IN TEXAS - THE COTTON LEADER - PRODUCTION DROPPED MORE THAN THREE MILLION BALES.

NO CDL:
FARM GROUPS ARE APPLAUDING THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, AFTER IT ANNOUNCED IT HAS NO PLANS TO IMPLEMENT NEW REGULATIONS THAT WOULD REQUIRE FARMERS TO GET COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSES TO OPERATE THEIR EQUIPMENT ON PUBLIC ROADWAYS. THE FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION HAS BEEN LOOKING AT THE RULES ON A STATE BY STATE BASIS. DOT RELEASED GUIDELINES TO STATES THAT CONTINUE TO ALLOW FARMERS, THEIR EMPLOYEES AND FAMILIES TO GET AN EXEMPTION.

AEM SALES REPORT:
AFTER A FAST START, TRACTOR AND COMBINE SALES ARE SLOWING DOWN. ACCORDING TO THE ASSOCIATION OF EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS, SALES THROUGH JULY NOW LAG WHAT THEY WERE LAST YEAR. IN THE AEM MONTHLY FLASH REPORT, SALES OF ALL TRACTORS IN THE U.S. WERE DOWN 7 PERCENT IN JULY. SO FAR IN 2011 TRACTOR SALES TOTAL JUST OVER 100,800, OFF ROUGHLY 400 UNITS COMPARED TO LAST YEAR. LARGER TRACTOR SALES BOTH TWO WHEEL AND FOUR WHEEL DRIVE, CONTINUE TO LEAD THE INDUSTRY. FOR THE YEAR, 4 WHEEL DRIVE TRACTORS ARE UP ABOUT 7%--COMBINE SALES HOWEVER, ARE DOWN ABOUT 1%.

ANALYSIS:
GARY WILHELMI

IN THE COUNTRY; TURF GRASS:
SOMETHING IN THE AIR IS POINTING TOWARDS FALL--THAT MEANS BACK TO SCHOOL AND OF COURSE FOOTBALL SEASON. BUT HAVE YOU EVER THOUGHT ABOUT THE TOUGH TURF MAKING UP YOUR FAVORITE TEAM'S GRID-IRON. TURN'S OUT THERE'S A LOT MORE TO GROWING IT THAN YOU MAY REALIZE. LYNDALL STOUT WITH OKLAHOMA STATE'S SUNUP TV TAKES A TRIP INTO THE OFTEN FORGOTTEN WORLD OF SOD FARMING.  THANKS LYNDALL. SOME TIMES IT PAYS TO WATCH GRASS GROW.  UP NEXT...THE START OF SCHOOL MEANS DORM FOOD...AND IT’S BECOMING BIG BUSINESS. DETAILS NEXT IN FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY.

COLLEGE FOOD:
NEARLY HALF OF COLLEGE STUDENTS SAY THE DINING HALL PLAYED A ROLL IN THEIR DECISION TO ATTEND THE SCHOOL. THAT'S FROM RESEARCH GROUP TECHNOMIC IN TODAY'S FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY.  THE COMPANY SAYS WITH 16 MILLION COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WHEEL-DING MORE THAN 300-BILLION DOLLARS AT THEIR DISCRESSION--FOOD SERVICE AT THE HIGHER ED LEVEL IS BIG BUSINESS.  ACCORDING TO THE STUDY OVER-ALL MORE THAN 60% OF STUDENTS EAT ON CAMPUS AT LEAST WEEKLY. YET ONLY TWO-THIRDS SAY THEY'RE SATISFIED WITH THE HEALTHY CHOICES BEING OFFERED. JUST OVER 20% OF STUDENTS SAY THEY LIMIT THEIR CONSUMPTION OF MEAT WHILE ABOUT HALF OF STUDENTS WANT THOSE DINING FACILITIES TO STAY OPEN LATER.

BUMBLE BEES DISAPPEAR:
AND HONEY BEES AREN'T THE ONLY POLINATORS. THEIR COUSINS THE BUMBLE BEES ARE ALSO HAVING POPULATION PROBLEMS. NOW THE USDA IS TRYING TO FIND OUT WHY? BOTH BEES ARE IMPORTANT POLLLINATORS OF PLANTS. BUMBLE BEES HAVE TRADITIONALLY BEEN USED IN GREEN HOUSES TO POLLINATE TOMOATOS AND PEPPERS. BUT COLONIES OF THESE BEES BEGAN TO SUFFER DISEASE PROBLEMS BACK IN THE LATE 90'S AND MANY COMPANIES STOPPED RAISING THEM. NOW RESEARCHERS ARE LOOKING FOR NEW SPECIES TO WORK IN GREEN HOUSES. THE CHALLENGE IS FINDING ONE'S THAT CAN DO THE JOB IN THEIR NATIVE RANGE. BEES IN THE WEST ARE DIFFERENT THAN BEES TO THE EAST. SCIENTISTS WANT TO MAKE SURE GREEN HOUSE BEES REMAIN IN A NATIVE ENVIRONMENT...SO AS NOT TO SPREAD DISEASE.
 

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