AgDay Daily Recap - July 19, 2012

July 19, 2012 05:57 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY
JULY 19, 2012

USDA PRESS BRIEFING:

Good morning I’m Tyne Morgan in for Clinton Griffiths. The relentless drought and its impact on American agriculture now has the attention of the White House. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack briefed the President Wednesday about the drought that's sweeping over much of the nation's corn-growing region and beyond.

FARM BILL UPDATE:

As far as the 2012 Farm Bill, there's still no word when the legislation would be brought to the full House of Representatives. Pro-farmer Washington consultant Jim Wiesemeyer says there any indications that the measure would face a "rocky" floor vote.  Cuts to the Food-Stamp program appear to be the biggest hurdle. Sources tell Wiesemeyer that the bill might not come-up until after the November election.

USDA OHIO VISIT:

USDA under-Secretary Michael Scuse toured drought-impacted farms in Ohio and Indiana on Tuesday and Wednesday. He saw and heard first-hand how this record drought is impacting farmers in much of the Midwest. In Paulding County, Ohio some farmers not have only crop damage, but their operations sustained structural damage from a powerful wind storm two weeks ago. It’s a double whammy for farmer Doug Goyings.

CORN COLLEGE DROUGHT:

Meanwhile in central Illinois, farmers are gathering at the 2012 Farm Journal Corn College. That event helps corn-growers learn some techniques to get the most bushels from their fields. A popular topic is this summers' drought. AgDay’s Clinton Griffiths is on assignment in Heyworth, Illinois.

CROP WATCH:

Even though the heat and lack of rain is hurting crops, some farmers are trying to keep their spirts-up. Mike Hoffman has details in cropwatch.

BEEF TODAY:

In our beef today report - September corn closed just below eight dollars Wednesday, up 15-and-a-half-cents. Livestock groups who are worried about the rising cost of feed say maybe it's time to revisit the renewable fuels standard. RFS2 - as its known - sets the federal mandated level on ethanol production.

LFTB UPDATE:

From fuel to food, the drought could ultimately lead to lean finely textured beef, or LFTB, to return to store shelves. That’s according to researchers at Rabobank.

GPS:

4-H'ers in Tennessee are using GPS technology so that others may enjoy the great outdoors.

They're using the hand-held device to map portions of the Appalachian Trail. In this report from the University of Tennessee, Chuck Denney tells us about the helpful blend of machines and nature. The Appalachian Trail is almost 22 hundred miles long. That’s about the same length as route 66.

WORKING WOMAN:

If you're a working woman putting in at least 35 hours a week at the office, your chance of packing on those unwanted pounds could be higher.

DARK CHOCOLATE:

In a lot of people's dream world, dark chocolate would be considered a health food. Well, Europe is one step closer to achieving this.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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