AgDay Daily Recap - June 27, 2011

June 27, 2011 06:05 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY:
JUNE 27, 2011

DESTRUCTIVE WEATHER:
GOOD MORNING. 2011 IS STARTING WITH SOME OF THE MOST EXTREME WEATHER IN HISTORY. NOW THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION CONFIRMS THE FIRST HALF OF THE YEAR IS ONE OF THE MOST DESTRUCTIVE ON RECORD. NOAA SAYS BETWEEN TORNADO'S IN THE MIDWEST, DROUGHT IN THE SOUTH, WILDFIRES IN THE SOUTHWEST AND WEST AND FLOODS IN THE NORTH AND CENTRAL U.S.--THE COST IS PILING UP. IT SAYS THERE HAVE ALREADY BEEN 8 ONE-BILLION DOLLAR-PLUS DISASTERS THIS YEAR. THEY ESTIMATE TOTAL DAMAGES FROM WILD WEATHER AT MORE THAN 32 BILLION DOLLARS. AND AS BAD AS IT IS, IT COULD GET WORSE. THE ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON STARTED JUNE FIRST.

HURRICANE SEASON:
WSI OR WEATHER SERVICES INTERNATIONAL IS FORCASTING 15 NAMED STORMS, 8 HURRICANES AND 4 INTENSE HURRICANES OF CATEGORY 3 OR BETTER. THAT'S HIGHER THAN THE LONG TERM AVERAGE. ALTHOUGH, THE LAST TWO YEARS THE U.S. HAS NOT HAD A HURRICANE MAKE LANDFALL. SCIENTISTS DON'T THINK THAT WILL BE THE CASE AGAIN THIS YEAR...THE LAST TIME THE U.S. WENT THREE YEARS WITHOUT A HURRICANE HITTING LAND WAS IN THE 1860S.

MISSOURI REVISITED:
A HURRICANE HITTING LAND USUALLY LEADS TO FLOODING AND THERE'S BEEN PLENTY OF THAT ACROSS PARTS OF THE COUNTRY. AS WE TOLD YOU LAST WEEK THE MISSOURI RIVER CONTINUES TO REEK HAVOC THROUGH THE NORTHERN AND CENTRAL PLAINS. EARLIER THIS SPRING IN SOUTH EASTERN MISSOURI, THE ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BLEW A HOLE IN THE BIRD'S POINT LEVEE ALONG THE MISSISSIPPI. THAT DECISION FLOODED ABOUT 130,000 FARM ACRES. OUR CAMERA'S JUST GOT BACK FROM THERE WHERE PRODUCERS ARE TRYING TO START OVER.

OKANOLA:
THANKS CINDI. 'BLACK GOLD' --THAT'S THE NICKNAME FOR CANOLA -- A CROP THAT'S GROWING IN FAVOR WITH CONSUMERS AND FARMERS ACROSS THE U.S. AND IN OKLAHOMA IN JUST A FEW SHORT YEARS, CANOLA ACRES ARE BOOMING. FROM OKLAHOMA STATE'S SUNUP TV, LYNDALL STOUT RIDES ALONG WITH CANOLA HARVEST IN THE SOONER STATE.

ANALYSIS:
BOB UTTERBACK

IN THE COUNTRY; COLLEGE OF OZARKS:
IMAGINE GOING TO COLLEGE AND NOT HAVING TO PAY TUITION. THAT'S THE POLICY AT THE COLLEGE OF THE OZARKS NEAR BRANSON, MISSOURI. BUT WHAT YOU DON'T PAY IN DOLLARS, YOU'LL PAY IN HARD WORK. IN FACT, THE COLLEGE IS NICKNAMED "HARD WORK U". ALL FULL-TIME STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO WORK ON CAMPUS AT LEAST 15 HOURS A WEEK. MANY OF THE AVAILABLE JOBS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH THE SCHOOL'S AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT. STUDENTS CAN WORK IN THE DAIRY, A GRIST MILL, OR A KITCHEN THAT MAKES AND SELLS HOME-MADE PRODUCTS. THIS COLLEGE IS A CHARACTER-BUILDER. STEVE GRANT FROM AFFILIATE KY-3 IN SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI TAKES US TO A PLACE WHERE FARM WORK AND CLASS WORK COUNT AT GRADUATION.  HARD WORK U IS OFTEN RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF THE BEST COLLEGE DEALS IN THE COUNTRY. IN ITS 2010 RANKINGS, U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT PLACED THE COLLEGE OF THE OZARKS AS SEVENTH BEST COLLEGE IN THE MIDWEST. AND IT RANKED NUMBER ONE FOR "BEST DEAL" THE COLLEGE OF THE OZARKS BAKES AND SELLS 25,000 FRUIT-CAKES EACH HOLIDAY SEASON. BUT THAT'S NOT ALL. THE SCHOOL ALSO SELLS BAGS OF FLOUR AND BISCUIT MIX, HOMEMADE APPLE BUTTER, JELLIES AND JAMS. I CAN'T WAIT TO SAMPLE SOME OF THIS!

TART CHERRY LOVERS:
CHERRY LOVERS HAVE A REASON TO SMILE THIS YEAR. IN FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY, THE U.S. TART CHERRY CROP IS FORECAST TO BE 40% HIGHER THAN LAST YEAR. IN MICHIGAN THE NATIONS LARGEST PRODUCING STATE, A COOL WET SPRING HAS THE FRUIT DEVELOPING SLOWER THAN NORMAL. BUT BLOOMS ARE WAY UP. THE SAME IS TRUE IN WISCONSIN. WASHINGTON STATE HAD COLD AND WET CONDITIONS EARLIER IN THE YEAR. FROST GOT SOME BLOOMS AND POLLINATION WAS A STRUGGLE. AND IN NEW YORK GROWERS EXPECT RECORD LOW PRODUCTION. OVERALL U.S. PRODUCTION IS SCHEDULED TO COME IN AROUND 266 MILLION POUNDS.

GARLIC:
AND IN CALIFORNIA, A COOL WET SPRING IS HAVING LITTLE TO NO IMPACT ON GARLIC PRODUCTION. THE GOLDEN STATE PRODUCES A MAJORITY OF THE NATION'S FRESH GARLIC. LAST YEAR FARMERS PLANTED MORE THAN 17,000 ACRES OF GARLIC. THAT'S ABOUT 10,000 LESS THAN IT DID TEN YEARS AGO. A THIRD OF THE CROP IS SOLD FRESH TO THE CONSUMER THE REST IS DEHYDRATED AND USED IN PROCESSED PRODUCTS.

CONTACT PAGE:
WE'D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! CONTACT US AT 800-792-4329. OR DROP AN EMAIL TO INBOX@AGDAY.COM. YOU CAN ALSO CHECK US OUT ON SOME OF THAT NEW TECHNOLOGY, AT WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/AGDAY.
 

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