AgDay Daily Recap - June 3, 2011

June 3, 2011 05:31 AM
 

 

 

TODAY ON AGDAY:
JUNE 3, 2011

DAKOTA WEATHER:
IN THE NORTHERN PLAINS, FARMERS AND RANCHERS ARE FACING CHALLENGES FEW HAVE EVER SEEN. PARTS OF THE STATE THAT RARELY SEE HIGH WATER, ARE REELING FROM MASSIVE AMOUNTS OF FLOODWATER. RIGHT NOW, RECORD FLOODING IS OCCURING ALONG THE MISSOURI RIVER IN THE WESTERN AND CENTRAL PARTS OF THE STATE. ON WEDNESDAY, THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS OPENED A FLOODWAY NORTHWEST OF BISMARCK TO RELIEVE PRESSURE. THE CORPS SAYS RESERVOIR RELEASES ON THE MISSOURI HAVE CHANGED SEVERAL TIMES IN JUST THE PAST FEW WEEKS, DUE TO CHANGING DAILY FORECASTS AND INCREASING PRECIPITATION IN WYOMING, MONTANA, NORTH DAKOTA AND SOUTH DAKOTA. AND IN THE NORTHERN PART OF THE STATE, NEAR MINOT, THE MOUSE RIVER IS FAR FROM TIMID. IT'S REACHING WELL BEYOND ITS NORMAL BOUNDARIES. BUT BEYOND THE OVERLAND FLOODING, JUST GENERAL FIELD SATURATION FROM CONSTANT RAINS IS PUTTING PRESSURE ON PRODUCERS. THIS PHOTO SENT TO US FROM CANDY BROOKS IN BOTTINEAU COUNTY IS A COMMON SCENE THROUGH-OUT NORTH DAKOTA. MUCH OF THE STATE'S FARMLAND IS SATURATED. ACCESS ROADS ARE OFTEN TOO SOFT FOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT. CORN IS ABOUT THREE QUARTERS PLANTED. NORMALLY IT'S AROUND 90%. THAT'S THE GOOD NEWS. BUT MOST OTHER MAJOR CROPS - LIKE DURUM WHEAT, CANOLA, SOYBEANS AND SUNFLOWERS - ARE 40, 50, EVEN 60 POINTS BEHIND THE AVERAGE PACE. FOR RANCHERS, THE PROBLEM IS GETTING HERDS TO SAFETY FROM RISING WATER. NICK DREYER FROM AFFILIATE KMOT IN MINOT HAS OUR STORY.

CRP GRAZING:
NORTH DAKOTA LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS JUST GOT APPROVAL TO GRAZE CRP ACRES. THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ASKED THE FARM SERVICE AGENCY TO CONSIDER ALLOWING PRODUCERS PERMISSION. THROUGH-OUT THE STATE, LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS ARE FINDING PASTURES INUNDATED WITH WATER AND WASHED-OUT ROADS PREVENTING OWNERS FROM HAULING CATTLE TO SUMMER PASTURES.  AARON CROWDER WITH THE NORTH DAKOTA FSA OFFICE SAYS THEY HAVE RECEIVED THE GO AHEAD FROM THEIR STATE COMMITTEE, WILDLIFE AND CONSERVATION GROUPS. HE SAYS ANY PRODUCER WHO DOESN'T HAVE ACCESS TO REGUALR GRAZING IS ELIGIBLE BUT THERE IS A 25% PAYMENT REDUCTION ON THE CRP CONTRACT.

SOY RAIL:
AT ONE POINT OR ANOTHER, A LARGE PORTION OF U.S. SOYBEANS ARE SHIPPED BY RAIL. WITH THAT IN MIND, THE SOY TRANSPORTATION COALITION CONDUCTED ITS SECOND ANNUAL RAIL CUSTOMER SATISFACTION INDEX. ACCORDING TO THE STC, THE SURVEY IS ANSWERED BY AGRICULTURAL SHIPPERS OF VARIOUS SIZES AND SCALE OF OPERATIONS. THE ELEVEN QUESTIONS LOOK AT ON TIME PERFORMANCE, CUSTOMER SERVICE AND COSTS. AFTER COMBINING THE RESULTS FROM THE QUESTIONS, UNION PACIFIC RECEIVED THE OVERALL HIGHEST RATING. BNSF SLIPPED TO SECOND PLACE. CANADIAN NATIONAL CAME IN THIRD. ITS OVERALL RATING JUMPED 38% FROM 2010. MIKE STEENHOEK FROM SOY TRANSPORTATION COALITION SAYS WHILE "MANY CONCERNS CONTINUE TO LINGER, AGRICULTURAL SHIPPERS ARE INCREASINGLY PLEASED WITH THE RAIL SERVICE THEY ARE RECEIVING." STC SAYS THE SEVEN RAILROADS ANNUALLY TRANSPORT MORE THAN 24 MILLION TONS OF SOYBEANS, 17 MILLION TONS OF SOYBEAN MEAL, AND 6 MILLION TONS OF SOYBEAN OIL.

INVASIVE PLANTS:
WE'VE TALKED A LOT ON THIS PROGRAM ABOUT WEED PRESSURE IN FIELDS, SUCH AS PALMER AMARANTH. BUT BEYOND THE FIELDS, THERE'S ANOTHER PRESSURE AS WELL - - INVASIVE PLANTS THAT CHOKE WOODED AREAS. IN THIS REPORT FROM IOWA DNR, JOE WILKINSON LOOKS AT EFFORTS TO REDUCE THE SPREAD. JOE SAYS IT'S MORE THAN JUST REMOVING AN UN-WANTED PLANT. HE SAYS IF YOU WADE-IN AND PULL OUT A PATCH OF GARLIC MUSTARD AT THE WRONG TIME OF THE YEAR, YOU'LL JUST RE-SEED THE ENTIRE AREA THAT YOU THOUGHT YOU JUST CLEARED.

LIVESTOCK ANTIBIOTICS:
A GROUP OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH ADVOCATES FILED SUIT AGAINST THE FDA IN AN EFFORT TO BAN THE USE OF TWO ANTIBIOTICS IN ANIMAL FEED. THEY'RE FOCUSING ON PENICILLIN AND TETRACYCLINE.  THEY SAY THEY'RE NOT TRYING TO STOP THE DOSING OF SICK ANIMALS ONLY "LOW-LEVEL" FEEDING OF THE ANTIBIOTICS FOR GROWTH AND SICKNESS PREVENTION. THE GROUP SAYS THE FDA "KNOWS" OVER FEEDING COULD LEAD TO THE RISE OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANT BACTERIA IN PEOPLE.

CHINA CORN:
AND THE GOVERNMENT RUN, CHINA NATIONAL GRAIN AND OILS INFORMATION CENTER IS PREDICTING RECORD CORN PRODUCTION FOR THAT COUNTRY. IT EXPECTS 181.5 MILLION METRIC TONS OF THE GRAIN IN 2011. THAT'S UP NEARLY 2.5%. THAT'S MORE THAN 9 MILLION TONS HIGHER THAN THE USDA'S ESTIMATE. IF IT HOLDS TRUE, CHINESE CORN IMPORTS WOULD LIKELY REMAIN LOW THROUGH 2012.

ANALYSIS:
GARY WILHELMI

IN THE COUNTRY; MISS 4-HERS:
4-H'ERS FROM AROUND THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI HEADED TO THE STATE CAPITOL RECENTLY TO SAY "THANK YOU" TO THE LAWMAKERS WHO HELP FUND 4-H PROGRAMS. THE TEENAGERS WANT LEGISLATORS TO KNOW THAT THE EXTENSION SERVICE IS AN IMPORTANT PART OF THEIR LIVES AS IT OVERSEES THE PROGRAM IN THEIR COUNTIES. IN THIS REPORT FROM MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY, LEIGHTON SPANN SAYS THE KIDS ARE ALSO LEARNING ABOUT "NETWORKING" WITH MOVERS AND SHAKERS AROUND THE STATE. THANKS LEIGHTON. FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY IS NEXT.

FOOD PYRAMID:
GOODBYE PYRAMID, HELLO PLATE. DETAILS IN FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY.  AS WE TOLD YOU YESTERDAY, USDA UN-VEILED A NEW "STRUCTURE" FOR HEALTHY EATING. GONE IS THE PYRAMID THAT WE'VE ALL SEEN. IT'S BEEN REPLACED WITH "MY PLATE." THE AGENCY SAYS THE NEW DIAGRAM SIMPLIFIES NUTRITION AND HEALTHY EATING. THE FOOD PYRAMID HAS BEEN USED IN VARIOUS FORMS SINCE 1992. USDA SAID IT WAS TOO COMPLEX. "MY PLATE" IS A CIRCLE, SHOWING FRUIT, VEGETABLES, PROTEIN AND GRAIN. ATTACHED TO THE UPPER RIGHT-HAND-SIDE OF THE PLATE IS A SMALLER CIRCLE TO REPRESENT THE NEED FOR DAIRY. CONSUMERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO FILL HALF OF THEIR PLATE WITH LOWER-CALORIES FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, A QUARTER OF THEIR PLATE WITH A LEAN SOURCE OF PROTEIN AND THE REMAINDER WITH A COMPLEX CARBOHYDRATE. IT ALSO RECOMMENDS SWITCHING TO FAT-FREE OR LOW-FAT MILK AND INCREASING THE WHOLE GRAINS.  FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO WWW.CHOOSEMYPLATE.GOV .

CA TOMATO PROCESSING:
COOL TEMPERATURES HAVE SLOWED DEVELOPMENT OF CALIFORNIA'S PROCESSING TOMATO CROP. THE CALIFORNIA FARM BUREAU SAYS CANNERIES THAT MAKE THE TOMATOES INTO TOMATO SAUCE, KETCHUP AND OTHER PRODUCTS HAVE CONTRACTED FOR 258,000 ACRES. THAT'S ABOUT 11,000 FEWER ACRES THAN LAST YEAR. RAIN CAUSED PLANTING DELAYS, BUT IN SPITE OF THE WEATHER CHALLENGES ANALYSTS SAY THE PLANTS REMAIN IN GOOD CONDITION.

CONTACT PAGE:
WE'D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! CONTACT US AT 800-792-4329. OR DROP AN EMAIL TO INBOX@AGDAY.COM . YOU CAN ALSO CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK.

 

 

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