AgDay Daily Recap - May 10, 2011

May 11, 2011 03:44 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY:
MAY 10, 2011

CROP PROGRESS:
USDA'S CROP PROGRESS REPORT SAW PLENTY OF THAT - PROGRESS - IN THE WESTERN CORN BELT LAST WEEK. BUT THE EASTERN CORN BELT IS STILL LAGGING. WE'LL HAVE THOSE NUMBERS IN A MOMENT. BUT FIRST, WE'LL LOOK AT ONE STATE WHERE PLANTING PROGRESS IS HARD TO FIND. WE BEGIN THIS MORNING NEAR MINOT, NORTH DAKOTA, WHERE PRODUCERS UNDERSTAND THAT THE WAITING GAME IS JUST PART OF THE BUSINESS. HERE'S NICK DREYER. THANKS NICK. USDA SAYS JUST 7% OF NORTH DAKOTA'S SPRING WHEAT IS PLANTED. THE AVERAGE IS 51%. IN THE TOP SIX STATES, 22% IS SEEDED. IT'S USUALLY OVER 60%. NOW TO THE CORN CROP WITH 40% PLANTED. WESTERN CORN BELT FARMERS MADE BIG GAINS LAST WEEK. 57% OF THE NEBRASKA CORN CROP IS NOW PLANTED, UP FROM 15% THE PREVIOUS WEEK. IN IOWA, IT'S 69%. THAT'S A GAIN OF 61-POINTS. EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, MIDWEST CORN GROWERS ARE STRUGGLING TO GET-IN THEIR CROP. A THIRD OF ILLINOIS CROP IS PLANTED. IT'S AN IMPROVEMENT FROM THE PREVIOUS WEEK BUT STILL 28 POINTS BEHIND AVERAGE. AND THE FURTHER EAST YOU GO, THE WORSE IT GETS. JUST 4% OF INDIANA CORN AND 2% OF OHIO CORN IS PLANTED. ANOTHER INDICATOR OF THE SLOW PROGRESS IS CROP EMERGENCE. USDA SAYS 7% OF THE CORN CROP HAS EMERGED. THAT'S A TWO POINT GAIN FROM LAST WEEK, BUT 14 POINTS BEHIND AVERAGE. OF THE 13 STATES WHERE THE CORN CROP HAS EMERGED, ONLY NORTH CAROLINA IS AHEAD OF AVERAGE.

PLANTING DELAYS:
WHAT IS THE RISK OF PLANTING CORN IN APRIL VERSUS MAY VERSUS JUNE? AS THE WEEKS CONTINUE TO RUSH BY, YIELD POTENTIAL CONTINUES TO FALL. OUR REPORTING PARTNERS AT www.agweb.com COMPILED THE CORN PLANTING DATES AND YIELD EFFECTS FOR MANY OF THE CORN BELT STATES. OF COURSE, PLANTING DATES IS JUST ONE OF THE MANY YIELD-INFLUENCING FACTORS FOR CORN. BE SURE TO CHECK OUT THE GRIDS ON AGWEB. LET'S CHECK IN NOW WITH MIKE HOFFMAN, MIKE.

MISSISSIPPI FLOOD:
THE MISSISSIPPI CONTINUES ITS CHARGE SOUTHWARD, FORCING RESIDENTS FROM THEIR HOMES. IT'S EXPECTED TO PEAK TODAY IN MEMPHIS. TO HELP PUT THE FLOODING INTO PERSPECTIVE, TAKE A LOOK AT SOME SATELLITE IMAGES PROVIDED TO US FROM NASA. THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN ONE YEAR AGO. IT SHOWS WHAT THE RIVER NORMALLY LOOKS LIKE FROM NEAR CAIRO, ILLINOIS TO JUST SOUTH OF MEMPHIS.  AND NOW TAKE A LOOK AT THIS. IT WAS TAKEN JUST LAST FRIDAY FROM THE EXACT SAME ORBITAL POSITION. YOU CAN CLEARLY SEE HOW FAR THE MISSISSIPPI SPREAD BEYOND ITS NORMAL BANKS. THE WATER VARIES IN COLOR FROM ELECTRIC BLUE TO NAVY. VEGETATION IS GREEN. OF COURSE, EVEN MORE DRAMATIC IMAGES CAN BE SEEN FROM THE AIR JUST ABOVE SOUTHEAST MISSOURI. THIS IS WHAT OUR CAMERAS SAW LAST WEEK AS WE FLEW ABOVE THE FLOODED FARMLAND NEAR CHARLESTOWN, MISSOURI. AND IT'S A SIMILAR SCENE PLAYING-OUT DOWN STREAM IN TENNESSEE, ARKANSAS, MISSOURI AND LOUISIANA.  SOME LOW-LYING TOWNS AND FARMLAND ALONG THE BANKS OF THE BIG RIVER HAVE BEEN INUNDATED. RECORD RIVER LEVELS, SOME DATING AS FAR BACK AS THE 1920S, HAVE ALREADY BEEN BROKEN IN SOME AREAS.

DAIRY WORKERS:
IN OUR DAIRY TODAY REPORT, REPRESENTATIVES INTRODUCED A NEW BILL TO THE HOUSE THAT COULD HAVE A MAJOR IMPACT ON FARM LABOR. IF PASSED IT WOULD GIVE DAIRY FARMERS ACCESS TO THE H-2A VISA PROGRAM. THAT PROGRAM ALLOWS FARMERS TO HIRE FOREIGN WORKERS IF DOMESTIC LABOR IS UNAVAILABLE. IT'S AN OPTION BEING USED BY OTHER INDUSTRIES AND OTHER SEGMENTS OF AGRICULTURE.  JUST LAST YEAR, THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ISSUED RULES EXCLUDING THE DAIRY INDUSTRY FROM H-2A WORKER PROGRAM.  THIS NEW BILL-- H-R 17-20 IS BEING INTRODUCED BY PETER WELCH OF VERMONT AND BILL OWENS OF NEW YORK. IT'S A COMPANION BILL TO SIMILAR LEGISLATION NOW HEADED THROUGH THE SENATE.

HEAT AND COWS:
DESPITE THIS SPRING'S SLOW START, NEW RESEARCH SUGGESTS THAT HIGH PRODUCING HOLSTEINS START EXPERIENCING HEAT STRESS A LOT SOONER THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT. THE HEAT PRODUCTION OF COWS PRODUCING 77 POUNDS OF MILK IS NEARLY 50% GREATER THAN A NON-LACTATING ANIMAL, SAYS BOB COLLIER, A UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA DAIRY SPECIALIST. AND WHEN MILK PRODUCTION CLIMBS ABOVE 100 POUNDS A DAY, THE THRESHHOLD TEMPERATURE FOR STRESS IS FURTHER REDUCED. ONCE TEMPERATURES REACH 70 DEGREES, HIGH PRODUCING HOLSTEINS ARE IN DANGER OF HEAT STRESS. RESPIRATION RATES EXCEED ONE BREATH PER SECOND. SUPPLEMENTAL COOLING, IN THE FORM OF FIRST FANS AND THEN INTERMITTEN WATER SPRINKLERS IS RECOMMENDED AS AMBIENT AIR TEMPERATURES RISE. MORE DETAILS CAN BE FOUND IN THE MAY ISSUE OF DAIRY TODAY, NOW AVAILABLE AT WWW.DAIRYTODAY.COM . THE STORY IS ALSO AVAILABLE IN SPANISH BY CLICKING ON BONUS CONTENT.

S&D REPORT:
IN AGRIBUSINESS, USDA WILL RELEASE ITS MAY SUPPLY AND DEMAND REPORT TOMORROW MORNING. OUR PARTNERS AT PRO FARMER NEWSLETTER SAY TRADERS LOOK FOR A SLIGHT INCREASE IN CORN CARRYOVER IN 2011 AND 12 FROM THE CURRENT MARKETING YEAR. FOR SOYBEANS, THE AVERAGE TRADE GUESS PUTS 2011 AND 2012 CARRYOVER NEAR 23 MILLION BUSHELS. TRADERS ALSO EXPECT WHEAT CARRYOVER TO TIGHTEN. THE REPORT COMES OUT WEDNESDAY MORNING AT 7:30 CENTRAL TIME. IN TODAY'S ANALYSIS, AGRIBUSINESS DIRECTOR LINDSAY HILL DISCUSSES THE OLD CROP.

ANALYSIS:
MIKE FLOREZ

IN THE COUNTRY; SPRING TURKEY:
FOR SPORTSMEN WHO ARE HOPING TO BAG A TURKEY THIS SPRING, THE HUNTING WINDOW IS QUICKLY CLOSING. IN IOWA, FOR INSTANCE, THE LAST DAY OF THE SEASON IS THIS COMING SUNDAY. WAITING UNTIL THE LAST OF THE SEASON CAN HAVE ITS BENEFITS. THE FOLIAGE SPROUTING FROM TREES HELPS HIDE HUNTERS. IN THIS REPORT FROM THE IOWA DNR, JOE WILKINSON HAS SOME TIPS ON TAGGING A TOM. JOE SAYS HUNTERS TOOK TEN-THOUSAND TOMS LAST SPRING. FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY IS NEXT.

WISCONSIN CHEESE:
IN FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY WISCONSIN MAINTAINED ITS POSITION AS THE NATION'S TOP CHEESE PRODUCING STATE LAST YEAR, WHILE INCREASING ITS OUTPUT OF SPECIALTY CHEESES. WISCONSIN CHEESE MAKERS ARE KNOWN FOR OFFERING A WIDE VARIETY OF HIGH QUALITY SPECIALTY CHEESES. THE STATE'S AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT REPORTED LAST WEEK THAT SPECIALTY CHEESES ACCOUNTED FOR 21 PERCENT OF WISCONSIN'S TOTAL CHEESE PRODUCTION. IN 2010, THE STATE PRODUCED 522 MILLION POUNDS OF SPECIALTY CHEESES--UP 48 MILLION POUNDS OVER THE PREVIOUS YEAR. BLUE, FETA, HISPANIC TYPES, SPECIALTY MOZZARELLA VARIETIES, PARMESAN WHEEL, AND SPECIALTY PROVOLONE CHEESES WERE THE STATE'S MOST WIDELY PRODUCED SPECIALTY PRODUCTS.

CHOCOLATE MILK:
KEEPING WITH OUR DAIRY THEME, MILK IS UNDERFIRE IN AMERICAN SCHOOLS...NO NOT REGULAR MILK..CHOCOLATE MILK. MANY SCHOOLS ACROSS THE COUNTRY ARE PROHIBITING OR EVEN BANNING THE DRINK.  THE REASON...HIGHER SUGAR CONTENT. CURRENTLY ABOUT 70% OF MILK CONSUMED IN SCHOOLS IS FLAVORED..MOSTLY CHOCOLATE. WHILE SOME BELIEVE ELIMINATING THE SWEETENED AND FLAVORED MILK WILL HELP COMBAT THE OBESITY EPIDEMIC FACING OUR CHILDREN...OTHERS SAY KIDS ARE MISSING OUT ON MUCH NEEDED NUTRIENTS. PREVIOUS STUDIES SHOW WITHOUT THE FLAVOR CONSUMPTION DROPS ABOUT 35%.

CHOCOLATE BRAIN:
MAYBE SCHOOLS SHOULD SWAP THE CHOCOLATE MILK FOR PLAIN CHOCOLATE. A NEW STUDY OUT FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF RED-ING SHOWS THAT EATING CHOCOLATE IMPROVES EYE AND BRAIN FUNCTION.  PUBLISHED IN THE JOURNAL PHYSIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR, THE SCIENTISTS FOUND THAT AFTER EATING DARK CHOCOLATE, THE TEST SUBJECTS HAD BETTER VISUAL REACTION TIMES AND SPACIAL MEMORY.  THE STUDY TESTED THE AFFECTS OF DARK CHOCOLATE VERSUS WHITE CHOCOLATE.


CONTACT PAGE:
WE'D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! CONTACT US AT 800-792-4329. OR DROP AN EMAIL TO INBOX@AGDAY.COM . YOU CAN ALSO CHECK US OUT ON SOME OF THAT NEW TECHNOLOGY, AT WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/AGDAY .
 

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