AgDay Daily Recap - May 25, 2011

May 25, 2011 09:40 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY:
MAY 25, 2011

FLOODING FARM BUREAU ESTIMATE:
HELLO EVERYONE. AFTER LEARNING FIRSTHAND FROM STATE FARM BUREAUS ABOUT RECENT FLOODING IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN, THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU FEDERATION NOW ESTIMATES THAT 3.5 MILLION ACRES OF FARMLAND HAS BEEN IMPACTED BY THE NATURAL DISASTER. ARKANSAS TOPPED THE LIST WITH A MILLION ACRES AFFECTED, A THIRD OF THAT WAS RICE. MISSISSISSIPPI, MISSOURI AND TENNESSEE ALL HAD ABOUT 600,000 ACRES UNDER WATER. ILLINOIS HAD 500,000 ACRES IMPACTED BY FLOOD WATERS. FARM BUREAU CHIEF ECONOMIST BOB YOUNG SAYS THIS FLOOD CAN BE COMPARED TO FLOODS IN 1993 AND '95 IN TERMS OF SCALE OF AFFECTED AREA. YOUNG SAYS IT'S CRITICAL THAT THE GOVERNMENT ACT QUICKLY TO REBUILD THE LEVEES AND ALLOW PRODUCERS TO MAKE PLANS FOR THE FUTURE.

LOUISIANA FARMER:
THE FARM BUREAU SAYS LOUISIANA HAD 280-THOUSAND ACRES OF FARMLAND IMPACTED BY THE FLOODING OF THE MISSISSIPPI. AND AS BAD AS THE FLOODING IS, THE BIGGER PROBLEM IN LOUISIANA IS DROUGHT. AVERY DAVIDSON FROM THE LOUISIANA FARM BUREAU HAS DETAILS. THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU ESTIMATES THAT 40% OF THE NATION'S RICE CROP HAS BEEN AFFECTED. MOST OF THAT COMES FROM THE EASTERN HALF OF ARKANSAS, WHICH SUSTAINED SIGNIFICANT FLOODING NOT ONLY FROM THE MISSISSIPPI BUT ITS TRIBUTARIES. THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU ESTIMATES THAT 40 PERCENT OF THE NATION'S RICE CROP HAS BEEN AFFECTED. MOST OF THAT COMES FROM THE EASTERN HALF OF ARKANSAS, WHICH SUSTAINED SIGNIFICANT FLOODING NOT ONLY FROM THE MISSISSIPPI BUT ITS TRIBUTARIES.

ANALYSIS:
ANDY SHISSLER

TEXAS DENIM 2ND PART:
TO HELP FURTHER SPARK DEMAND FOR COTTON GROWN IN THE SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES, A TEXAS-BASED COTTON CO-OP IS REACHING OUT TO THE FASHION-DESIGN INDUSTRY. THE 'PLAINS COTTON COOPERATIVE" THINKS IT MAKES PERFECT "FASHION SENSE".  IN THIS REPORT FROM TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY, SCOTT IRLBECK SAYS THE STUDENTS ARE GETTING A "FIELD-TO-FINISHED" JEANS EDUCATION.  THE WINNING DESIGNERS RECEIVED A CASH PRIZE AND A TRIP. THEY'LL BE VISITING A PLANT IN GUATEMALA WHERE JEANS ARE CUT AND SEWN FOR PLAINS COTTON COOPERATIVE. THEY'LL ALSO ATTEND A TEXTILE SHOW IN COLOMBIA, SPONSORED BY COTTON COUNCIL INTERNATIONAL. NEXT, WHEN IT COMES TO COOKING PORK, YOU CAN TOSS OUT THE COOK-BOOK. DETAILS IN FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY.

SPORTS DRINKS:
A NEW CLINICAL REPORT SHOWS MANY CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS ARE DRINKING SPORTS AND ENERGY DRINKS WHEN THEY DON'T REALLY NEED THEM. . . AND THAT CAN BE HARMFUL. THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS PUBLISHED A STUDY THAT LOOKS AT THE POPULAR DRINKS AND HOW THEY'RE BEING MIS-USED. ONE OF THE AUTHORS OF THE REPORT SAYS SOME KIDS ARE DRINKING ENERGY DRINKS - WHICH CONTAIN LARGE AMOUNTS OF CAFFEINE - WHEN THEIR GOAL IS SIMPLY TO REHYDRATE AFTER EXERCISE. THIS MEANS THEY'RE INGESTING LARGE AMOUNTS OF CAFFEINE AND OTHER STIMULANTS. SOME CANS OR BOTTLES OF ENERGY DRINKS CAN HAVE MORE THAN 500 MILLIGRAMS OF CAFFEINE, WHICH IS THE EQUIVALENT OF 14 CANS OF SODA, ACCORDING TO THE REPORT. ON THE OTHER HAND, SPORTS DRINKS CONTAIN MINERALS, ELECTROLYTES AND FLAVORING. THEY'RE INTENDED TO REPLACE WATER AND ELECTROLYTES LOST AFTER A HARD WORK-OUT. THE REPORT SAYS THOSE DRINKS CAN BE HELPFUL FOR YOUNG ATHLETES WHO ARE IN PROLONGED, VIGOROUS EXERCISE. BUT IN MANY CASES, KIDS ARE DRINKING THEM JUST LIKE ANY SOFT DRINK. THE DOCTORS SAID STICK WITH GOOD OLD-FASHIONED PLAIN WATER.
 

COOKING PORK:
NEW GUIDELINES MAY HELP PREVENT YOU FROM OVER-COOKING PORK, WHILE STILL KEEPING IT SAFE. DETAILS IN FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY. USDA'S FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE ANNOUNCED TUESDAY THAT YOU DON'T HAVE COOK PORK AS LONG AS YOU WERE LED TO BELIEVE. THE AGENCY SAYS PORK CUTS - LIKE LOIN, CHOPS AND ROASTS - CAN BE CONSUMED SAFELY WHEN COOKED TO AN INTERNAL TEMPERATURE OF 145 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT. PLUS, YOU NEED TO LET THE PORK REST FOR THREE MINUTES AFTER PULLING IT FROM THE GRILL OR STOVE. THE NEW RECOMMENDED TEMPERATURE IS 15 DEGREES LESS THAN WHAT WAS PREVIOUSLY RECOMMENDED. ACCORDING TO THE PORK CHECKOFF, THE MEAT WILL BE A BIT PINKER IN COLOR THAN WHAT MOST COOKS ARE USE TO. USDA SAYS GROUND PORK - LIKE ALL GROUND MEAT - SHOULD STILL BE COOKED TO 160 DEGREES. THE NEW GUIDELINES ARE THE RESULT OF A RESEARCH PROJECT FUNDED BY THE PORK CHECKOFF. IT WAS CONDUCTED BY OHIO STATE SCIENTISTS TO MEASURE CONSUMER EATING PREFERENCES. THEIR RISK ASSESSMENT SHOWED NO DIFFERENCE IN COOKING PORK BETWEEN 145-AND-160 DEGREES. USDA AND THE NATIONAL PORK BOARD RECOMMEND COOKS USE A DIGITAL THERMOMETER TO ENSURE AN ACCURATE FINAL TEMPERATURE.

CONTACT PAGE:
WE'D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! YOU CAN CALL, EMAIL OR STRIKE-UP A CONVERSATION ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE.
 

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