AgDay Daily Recap - May 31, 2011

May 31, 2011 03:06 AM
 

TODAY ON AGDAY:
MAY 31, 2011

ROOK FARM BILL:
GOOD MORNING. THE SENATE AG COMMITTEE IS HOLDING ITS FIRST FIELD HEARING TODAY IN PREPARATION FOR THE WRITING OF THE 2012 FARM BILL. COMMITTEE CHAIR, SENATOR DEBBIE STABENOW, IS HOSTING THE HEARING IN HER HOME STATE OF MICHIGAN. WITH THE BELT TIGHTENING OF THE FEDERAL BUDGET, FARM GROUPS ARE GEARING UP FOR EXPECTED CUTS. AGDAY REGIONAL REPORTER MICHELLE ROOK TELLS US HOW THE GROUPS HOPE TO DEFEND AGAINST EXTREME CUTS IN DISASTER AND RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS. HOUSE AG COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN FRANK LUCAS SAYS HE'S ALSO CONCERNED ABOUT WRITING A FARM BILL WITH SO MANY FRESHMAN MEMBERS ON THE AG COMMITTEE AND IN THE HOUSE. HE SAYS THERE IS DEFINITELY A LEARNING CURVE AND THAT'S WHY HE SLOWED DOWN THE PROCESS FROM THE PREVIOUS SCHEDULE SET BY DEMOCRAT COLLIN PETERSON.

COOL WTO:
IN OTHER NEWS...IT APPEARS THE WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION MAY BE CLOSE IN RULING THAT THE COUNTRY-OF-ORIGIN-LABELING LAW IN THE UNITED STATES VIOLATES WTO TRADE STANDARDS. WWW.FEEDSTUFFS.COM IS REPORTING THAT A PANEL APPOINTED BY WTO HAS ISSUED A PRELIMINARY RULING AGAINST THE U.S. COOL WAS AUTHORIZED AS PART OF THE FARM BILL AND WAS IMPLEMENTED IN 2008. IT REQUIRES RETAILERS TO SHOW ON THE PACKAGE WHERE MEATS, FRESH FRUITS AND NUTS COME FROM. CANADA AND MEXICO FILED A COMPLAINT WITH WTO AGAINST THE UNITED STATES CALLING IT AN ILLEGAL, NON-TARIFF TRADE BARRIER. ACCORDING TO FEEDSTUFFS, THE PRELIMINARY RULING WAS ISSUED ON MAY 20TH. WTO WILL LIKELY ISSUE ITS FINAL RULING THIS FALL.

AGDAY INBOX:
WE'D LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU ABOUT COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING. IS IT GOOD POLICY OR A TRADE BARRIER? SEND YOUR COMMENTS TO THE AGDAY INBOX. YOU CAN EMAIL YOUR COMMENTS TO INBOX@AGDAY.COM , OR JOIN THE CONVERSATION ON FACEBOOK.

DAIRY TODAY:
IN OUR DAIRY TODAY REPORT....THE INDUSTRY CELEBRATES "DAIRY MONTH" EACH JUNE. AND AT LEAST THIS YEAR, THERE ARE THINGS WORTH CELEBRATING - LIKE IMPROVED MILK PRICES. DAIRY MANAGERS ARE STILL TRYING TO PLAY CATCH-UP FROM THE ECONOMICALLY DISASTROUS 2009 AND 2010 BUSINESS YEARS WHEN PRICES PLUMMETED 40%. THOUGH PRICES HAVE IMPROVED, CHALLENGES REMAIN. UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS ECONOMIST MIKE HUTJENS SAYS FUEL AND FEED-PRICE INCREASES WILL IMPACT DAIRY FARM PROFIT MARGINS. ANOTHER CONCERN IS CONSUMER DEMAND. WHILE YOGURT, COTTAGE CHEESE AND LOW-FAT MILK CONSUMPTION IS UP, FLAVORED MILK, WHOLE MILK AND ICE CREAM DROPPED. DAIRY TODAY EDITOR JIM DICKRELL SAYS THE INDUSTRY IS STILL WORRIED ABOUT DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION. BACK TO THE ILLINOIS REPORT...IT SHOWS FLUID MILK CONSUMPTION IN THE U.S. IS ABOUT 200 POUNDS PER CAPITA. IN CHINA, IT'S JUST 23 POUNDS. HUTJENS SAYS THAT MEANS TREMENDOUS POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE SALES.

DT CALVES ON FEED:
AND MORE DAIRY CALVES ARE HEADED FOR FEED YARDS THIS YEAR.  THAT'S FROM THE USDA'S LATEST CATTLE ON FEED REPORT. APRIL PLACEMENTS IN BIG DAIRY STATES ARE UP. IN ARIZONA PLACEMENTS ARE NEARLY 60% HIGHER FOR THE YEAR. HIGHER FEEDER PRICES AND DRY WEATHER IN THE SOUTHERN PLAINS ARE BEING PINNED FOR THE INCREASE. OVERALL, CATTLE AND CALVES ON FEED IN FEEDLOTS OVER ONE THOUSAND HEAD IS UP ABOUT 7.5% FROM LAST YEAR. FEEDER CATTLE NUMBERS ARE UP NEARLY 10%. WEATHER AND PRICES ARE ALSO PULLING BOVINE FROM MEXICO--FEEDER CATTLE IMPORTS ARE UP 26%.  AND DON'T FORGET, FOR THE VERY LATEST NEWS AFFECTING THE DAIRY INDUSTRY, INCLUDING PRODUCTION AND POLICY ISSUES, CHECK OUT WWW.DAIRYTODAY.COM .

ANALYSIS:
GARY WILHELMI

TORNADO SCIENCE HOFFMAN:
THE SPRING STORM SEASON HAS BEEN DEVASTATING TO MANY FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES. BEHIND THE DESTRUCTION, THERE IS SCIENCE AND EFFORTS TO PROTECT PEOPLE AND THEIR HOMES. METEOROLOGIST MIKE HOFFMAN SHOWS US HOW ENGINEERS ARE TRYING TO MAKE YOU SAFER.
THANKS MIKE. COMING UP WE'RE HEADED TO THE GOLDEN STATE FOR A TASTE OF A GOLDEN FRUIT. A NEW APRICOT VARIETY NEXT ON THE IN THE COUNTRY. AND LATER, SPLITTING BLUEBERRIES COST GROWERS MILLIONS OF DOLLARS EVERY YEAR. FIND OUT THE LASTEST RESEARCH BEHIND THE PROBLEM AND WHAT POTENTIAL FIXES ARE FINDING THEIR WAY TO GROWERS.

IN THE COUNTRY; CANDY COT:
IT WAS 1792 WHEN THE FIRST CALIFORNIA APRICOTS WERE HARVESTED...PLANTED YEARS EARLIER BY SPANISH EXPLORERS.  TODAY, THE STATE GROWS ABOUT 17,000 ACRES OF APRICOTS, ALMOST ALL OF THIS COUNTRY'S CROP. TRACY SELLERS OF CALIFORNIA COUNTRY TV TAKES US TO ONE FARM WHERE A GENETICIST AND HIS FARMING FRIEND ARE GROWING NATURE'S CANDY. UP NEXT THERE'S NEW RESEARCH FOR GROWERS LOOKING TO PICK THE PERFECT BLUE BERRY. FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY, AFTER THE BREAK.

SPLITTING BLUEBERRIES:
IN FOOD AND YOUR FAMILY BLUE BERRIES ARE A GREAT SOURCE OF NUTRIENTS AND ANTIOXIDANTS. BUT FOR GROWERS--THE FRUIT CAN BE FINICKY. IN A YEAR BLUEBERRY SPLITTING CAN CAUSE LOSSES OF 300 TO 500 DOLLARS AN ACRE. THAT'S WHY USDA RESEARCHERS ARE WORKING TO UNDERSTAND THE PROBLEM.

CONTACT PAGE:
AS I SAID EARLIER, WE'D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! CONTACT US AT 800-792-4329. OR DROP AN EMAIL TO INBOX@AGDAY.COM . YOU CAN ALSO BECOME A FAN ON FACEBOOK, AT WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/AGDAY .
 

 

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