HRW Wheat Conditions Deteriorate Through February

March 3, 2014 09:47 AM
 

 

 

According to state crop reports, the condition of the winter wheat crops in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas declined through February Below is a table that includes crop condition ratings from the respective state statisticians.

Crop condition
Very Poor
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Kansas -
03/02/14
4
18
44
32
2
02/03/14
3
17
45
33
2
 
Okla. -
03/02/14
6
25
38
28
3
02/03/14
4
20
40
31
5
 
Texas -
03/02/14
16
30
39
14
1
02/03/14
14
27
40
17
2

Here are some of the key observations in the state monthly summaries:

Kansas: For the month of February 2014, cold, snowy weather at the beginning of the month resulted in over a foot in some northeast areas, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Monthly precipitation totals were within a half inch of normal across much of the state. Aver age temperatures were colder than normal, with most areas averaging six to ten degrees colder than normal. As the snow melted, wheat fields started to green up and show signs of growth. Some concerns continue regarding the potential for winterkill due to the extremely cold temperatures. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 17 percent very short, 38 short, 4 4 adequate, and 1 surplus . Subsoil moisture supplies rated 2 1 percent very short, 40 short , 39 adequate, and 0 surplus.

Oklahoma: The month began with cold temperatures and several bouts of snow. Oklahoma welcomed the snow with hopes that the added precipitation would help to alleviate drought conditions. After the first few weeks of February, there was still no improvement. Producers in Roger Mills County were in desperate need of precipitation to bring small grain crops to harvest. During the latter part of the month, high winds and worsening drought conditions contributed the extreme fire danger and the overall damage to crops and topsoil moisture. Toward the middle of the month, temperatures increased slightly. Most areas of the state were in the 40’s to 50’s while the Panhandle reached a high of 70 degrees on the 24th. Wildfires occurred in parts of the state, but were not widespread. According to the most recent drought monitor, the majority of the state was rated severe drought to abnormally dry, while the Panhandle and the far Southwest districts were rated in extreme to exceptional drought. Some canola was lost to winter kill. The Southeast district averaged just over an inch of rainfall for the month, while the Northeast district averaged less than half an inch. All nine districts were still below normal precipitation for the period since September 1st. Small grain condition ratings and pasture conditions were mostly fair to poor for the month of February. Topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions were rated 87 percent and 83 percent short to very short, respectively. Thirteen percent of topsoil moisture and 17 percent of subsoil moisture were rated adequate and none were rated surplus. Conditions of small grains and canola continued to decline over the past month and were rated mostly fair to poor. Forty- two percent of the wheat crop was being grazed, six points ahead of the five-year average, and 16 points more than during February 2013.

Texas: A mixed bag of weather was reported across Texas this week. Most areas saw a return to warmer temperatures with highs in the 80’s midweek. However, the High Plains recorded freezing temperatures with snow and sleet at week’s end with precipitation totals ranging from 0.25 inches to 2 inches. East Texas received up to 2 inches of precipitation with the remainder of the state receiving a trace up to an inch of moisture. Winter wheat conditions improved in the Northern High Plains and the Edwards Plateau where precipitation was received. Irrigation aided the progress of oats in South Texas.


 

Back to news


Comments

 
Spell Check

No comments have been posted to this News Article

Corn College TV Education Series

2014_Team_Shot_with_Logo

Get nearly 8 hours of educational video with Farm Journal's top agronomists. Produced in the field and neatly organized by topic, from spring prep to post-harvest. Order now!

Markets

Market Data provided by QTInfo.com
Brought to you by Beyer
Close