HRW Wheat Conditions Deteriorate Through Winter

February 4, 2014 03:41 AM
 

 

 

According to state crop reports, the hard red winter wheat crops in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas have deteriorated sharply since going into dormancy. Below is a table that includes crop condition ratings from the respective state statisticians. We pulled the most current data released yesterday afternoon and compare it to the last "official" ratings on November 23, 2013.

Crop condition
Very Poor
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Kansas -
11/25/13
1
3
33
56
7
02/03/14
3
17
45
33
2
 
Okla. -
11/25/13
1
4
18
61
16
02/03/14
4
20
40
31
5
 
Texas -
11/25/13
8
20
40
26
6
02/03/14
14
27
40
17
2

 

Here are some of the key observations in the state monthly summaries:

Kansas: For the month of January 201 4 , dry conditions prevailed across most of Kansas according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. The snowfall during the month did not bring much moisture, as most of the State saw less than half the normal precipitation . Average monthly temperatures were cooler than normal for most of the eastern two thirds of Kansas. The western third of the State saw around normal temperatures, with the warmest being in the far northwest. Farmers in areas with little to no snow cover we re concerned with winterkill on their wheat crop. Some farmers began top dressing their wheat and got an early start to applying anhydrous ammonia. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 19 percent very short, 38 short, 42 adequate, and 1 surplus . Subsoil moisture supplies rated 20 percent very short, 37 short , 43 adequate, and 0 surplus.

Oklahoma: Conditions of small grains and canola declined over the past month. Small grains and canola were rated mostly good to fair. Forty-one percent of the wheat crop was being grazed, six points ahead of the five - year average, and 19 points more than during January 2013. January started out with frigid temperatures. Nowata recorded a low of twelve degrees below zero on the 6 th . During the second week of the month, temperatures increased, most areas of the state were in the 70’s. Grandfield recorded a high of 80 degrees on the 12 th . The warmer temperatures mixed with high winds and low humidity, significantly increased the risk of wildfires. Wildfires were experienced in parts of the state, but were not widespread. In the Northeast district, several acres were burned causing damage to pastureland. Overall the month of January was categorized as high winds and little to no precipitation. According to the most recent drought monitor, the majority of the state was rated abnormally dry to no drought at all, while the Panhandle and the far Southwest district were rated an extreme to exceptional drought. Due to the limited amount of moisture, wheat grazing was inadequate. Some canola and winter wheat have also experienced freeze damage. The Southeast district averaged just over an inch of rainfall for the month, while the Panhandle and West Central districts averaged less than half an inch. All nine districts were still below normal precipitation for the period since September 1st. Small grain condition ratings and pasture conditions were mostly good to fair for January. Topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions were both rated 72 percent short to very short, 28 percent adequate and none surplus.

Texas: Wheat producers in the Cross-Timbers reported wheat going into a semi dormant state due to the cold, dry weather. Producers in the Edwards Plateau were encouraged by the wet cold weather. Wheat in the Coastal Bend had been damaged by migratory birds.Cold temperatures continued as another winter storm hit Texas. Many areas of North East Texas, South East Texas and the Lower Valley saw significant amounts of precipitation. South Central Texas and the Blacklands saw small amounts of ice and sleet. South Texas and the Edwards Plateau received trace amounts of precipitation.


 

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