HRW Wheat Conditions Improve After Widespread Rains

March 26, 2012 01:16 PM
 

According to state crop reports, the hard red winter wheat crops in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas responded favorably to last week's rains. State crop condition reports show the crop gaining ground -- with crops rated "excellent" up in each state.

Next week, USDA will release their first national crop condition and progress reports for the year.

Crop condition
Very Poor
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Kansas -
03/26/12
2
6
33
48
11
03/19/12
3
8
35
46
8
 
Okla. - 03/26/12
1
5
19
56
19
03/19/12
1
6
23
56
14
 
Texas - 03/26/12
11
19
31
28
11
03/19/12
16
22
28
24
10

Here are some of the key observations in the state monthly summaries:

Kansas: Last week, Kansas producers throughout the State received ample amounts of precipitation coupled with unseasonably warm temperatures. All but 5 of the 52 stations reported rain totals of an inch or more with Columbus leading the State at 5.82 inches, followed by Pittsburg at 5.55 inches, and Parsons at 4.55 inches. Average temperatures last week were still warm for March and ranged from 3 to 15 degrees above normal as highs were predominantly in the 70’s with the western districts reporting high temperatures mostly in the low 80’s. Only 10 stations reported low temperatures at or below freezing, while most of the State saw low temperatures in the mid-30’s to mid-40’s. Kansas farmers averaged 1.9 days suitable for fieldwork last week with the eastern districts averaging less than one day. With the widespread rains, topsoil moisture improved to 6 percent very short, 10 percent short, 60 percent adequate, and 24 percent surplus. A year ago, topsoil moisture was rated as 17 percent very short, 21 percent short, 53 percent adequate and 9 percent surplus. Topsoil moisture supplies greatly improved for the western districts as the Southwest District reported 52 percent adequate to surplus. This is the first week since the beginning of August 2010 that topsoil moisture has been over 50 percent adequate to surplus in Southwest Kansas. Subsoil moisture supplies improved to 8 percent very short, 23 percent short, 60 percent adequate, and 9 percent surplus. Fieldwork was slowed by the wet weather, but some farmers were able to top-dress wheat, spray for weeds and disease, and prepare for spring planting. With the precipitation and warm weather the condition of the wheat crop improved to 2 percent very poor, 6 percent poor, 33 percent fair, 48 percent good, and 11 percent excellent. Last year at this time the wheat condition was considerably worse at 13 percent very poor, 22 percent poor, 34 percent fair, 27 percent good and 4 percent excellent. The crop is progressing rapidly as thirty-six percent of wheat has jointed across Kansas, more than two weeks ahead of 11 percent for both last year and the 5-year average. Wheat in the South Central District jumped from 24 percent jointed on March 18 to 70 percent jointed on Sunday to lead the State. Wind damage to Kansas wheat was rated at 10 percent light, 5 percent moderate, and 1 percent severe. Insect infestation increased to 7 percent light and 2 percent moderate, while disease infestation increased to 9 percent light and 1 percent moderate.

Oklahoma: A slow moving storm system brought needed rain across much of the state, improving drought conditions. The Drought Monitor dated March 20th, showed 45 percent of the state was no longer in a drought condition, compared to 38 percent the prior week. The majority of the Panhandle remained in an extreme to exceptional drought, and areas of the western part of the state remained in a moderate to severe drought. The highest amount of precipitation was recorded at Pryor’s Mesonet station in the Northeast, at 7.61 inches, and the lowest amount, 0.33 inches, was received at the Kenton station in the Panhandle. Flooding was reported in parts of central and eastern Oklahoma. Both Oklahoma City and Tulsa recorded new daily rainfall records on March 19th, when 3.02 and 2.81 inches of rain were received for the areas. High temperatures for each Mesonet district were at or above 80 degrees, with the state high of 87 degrees reported at Kenton in the Panhandle. The rains slowed field work last week with little progress made in seedbed preparation for spring crops. Small grain crops responded favorably to the recent moisture. The recent rains also brought relief to ranchers as pasture conditions improved and warm season forage growth excelled. Topsoil moisture conditions improved significantly from last week’s rain, with 87 percent rated adequate to surplus. Subsoil moisture showed improvement with 56 percent rated adequate to surplus, up from 41 percent from last week. There were only 2.4 days suitable for field work. Small Grains: Small grain crops and canola benefitted from the recent rains, improving progress and conditions for all crops. Wheat jointing was 73 percent complete by Sunday, up 20 points from last week and 23 points ahead of the five-year average, heading had begun in a few areas.

Texas: Rain fell across most of the state last week. Many parts of the Panhandle and the Trans-Pecos received much-needed moisture. Rainfall totals mostly ranged from 0.01 to 5 inches for the week. Wheat and oats benefited from recent moisture, though irrigation was still active in some areas. Overall, small grain condition improved. Some producers were scouting fields for insects and fungal diseases. Problems with rust, powdery mildew, and armyworms in winter wheat were reported.


 

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